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About Tux Machines

Monday, 22 Jul 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Hits Feature Freeze Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 7:06am
Story gnome 3 followup Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 7:03am
Story Linux Mint 17.1 to Feature a Much Better Update Manager Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:58am
Story ownCloud to organize Developer Conference in Berlin Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:52am
Story Did Brendan Eich Contribute to Firefox's Decline? Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:44am
Story China Developing Its Own OS To Take On Apple, Microsoft, and Google Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:35am
Story Specialization and the Linux Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 25/08/2014 - 6:28am
Story Linus Torvalds is my hero, says 13 year old Zachary DuPont Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 11:25pm
Story on the Dark Ages of Free Software: a “Free Service Definition”? Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 4:15pm
Story The Ubuntu Touch Image #203 Is Quite Fast And Stable Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 7:42am

U.S. PTO smashes JPEG patent

Filed under
Misc

Another attempt to tie down a standard with a patent has gone down in flames. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has rejected a patent that Forgent Networks was asserting against the Joint Photographic Experts Group, better known as JPEG, images standard.

Mark Shuttleworth Interview, Part I: on Dapper, and Ubuntu in the Enterprise

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

Recently, Ubuntu founder and Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth spoke with The 451 Group at length about Dapper, Ubuntu, and the trends and development of the open source and free software movements as they relate to enterprise information technology. In this multi-part series, The 451 Group will present Shuttleworth’s comments along with insight and commentary from 451 Group analysts who cover the worlds of open source and enterprise software.

Games Review - Triplex Invaders : Maniadrive : Lost Labyrinth

Filed under
Gaming

Sometimes you just need to take a break and play some games. To that end we've got the return of the weekly gaming review at PCBurn! Three different Linux titles, all free software, have made the cut.

First impressions of Picasa - Google's first rate Graphics suite for Linux

Filed under
Google

Today, Google did something which would gladden the hearts of thousands of GNU/Linux users - well atleast those who are not as rigid in outlook about GPL any way. That is they finally released a version ofPicasa for Linux. I downloaded the deb file from the Google's Picasa site since I run Ubuntu as my main GNU/Linux distribution. And the installation went quite smoothly.

Red Hat Plugs Multiple Linux Kernel Flaws

Filed under
Security

Linux software provider Red Hat issued a security advisory for a number of its products, addressing a series of kernel vulnerabilities in the operating system software.

Quick Look at Ubuntu 6.06 LTS Release Candidate

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

The highly successful Ubuntu development team released a release candidate of their upcoming version 6.06 desktop operating system. We haven't tested Ubuntu quite a while and thought it'd be interesting to see how things have changed. We also thought it'd might be of interest to others to see how this release was shaping up.

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Commonly used commands in SSH

Filed under
HowTos

ls -l === This Will List All Files/Directories In Your Current Directory
ls -al === Lists All Files & Information
ls –alR === Lists All Files & Information In All SubDirectories
cd === Changes Directory
clear === Clears The Screen

Build It Yourself: A Linux Network Appliance

Filed under
Misc

Practically Networked invites to join our new series on how to build your own Linux-based network appliance. If you're a small business owner with a shared Internet connection and some networked PCs, this is just what you need to secure your LAN with a powerful, flexible device that outperforms comparable commercial devices for a fraction of the cost, or even no cost at all.

Enterprise Unix Roundup: Fuel Injection for HP-UX

Filed under
OS

IBM will tripling the middleware offerings (including WebSphere, Rational, Tivoli, and Lotus) available for HP-UX so that they span the systems vendor's entire portfolio. In other news Linux servers grew 17 percent and now account for 12.2 percent of all server revenue. Linux is found to be much faster than Apple's OS X for statistical computing.

GL to the power of X

It's always fun when the future sneaks up on you, and in the last few months that's exactly what's happened in the land of X. Hackers at Novell crawled into a deep, dark basement and spent months hacking away in secret before emerging in January, eyes blinking from the light, with a still experimental but surprisingly usable OpenGL-based X server called Xgl.

Starting Processes in Fedora, SuSe, Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

At some point we all need to get into our Linux system, and ensure that key processes are started correctly at boot-up. This very brief guide will show you how to find and start your system processes also called services by using the cron process as an example.

Henry's Tech Advice #3 - Python Functions

My name is Henry the Adequate, and I am a superhero. Felinn asks “In python, how do you call functions? Also, is there an ni function?

More Adventures in Kernel Security

Filed under
Linux

As promised, I took my own advice and started playing around with some of the improved kernel modules that I wrote about in a previous article. My kernel module of choice for this exercise was grsecurity. After searching around for a Linux distribution that was built on the most recent kernel, I settled on the latest Rubix distribution.

Backing Up and Restoring Using the cpio Command in Linux and Unix

Filed under
Linux
Gentoo
Slack
SUSE
Ubuntu

The cpio command is one of the most commonly used Linux back up tools. Unlike tar , in which the files to back up are typed in as part of the command, cpio reads the files to work with from the standard input (in other words, the screen).

SA open source game developers' quest for glory

Filed under
OSS

A group of South African game developers will meet in Johannesburg tomorrow to hammer out plans for the development of an open source adventure role-playing game that they hope will reinvigorate South Africa's game development industry.

Should Oracle fear open source?

Filed under
Misc

Oracle continues to dominate the database software market but challenges lie ahead from open source, analysts say. The biggest threat to Oracle's dominance of the market could be open source competitors such as MySQL, analysts said.

PIcasa on Linux, so far

Filed under
Software

What the hell, scoops are over-rated anyway. News is news. In this case, news that Google has released Picasa, its photo editing and organizing software, on Linux. That's before they release it on Apple (if they ever do). I believe this is a first.

MySQL Seen as a Buyout Target

Filed under
OSS

As the world of software consolidates and open-source programs become more popular, some observers think MySQL is the company most likely to be acquired by a software giant.

Report: Open Source a Judgment Standard

Filed under
OSS

Open Source is changing the way that Gartner Group measures the application development market. The big loser as a result may well be proprietary Java application development tools.

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More in Tux Machines

First Release Candidate of Linux 5.3

  • Linux 5.3-rc1
    It's been two weeks, and the merge window is over, and Linux 5.3-rc1
    is tagged and pushed out.
    
    This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the
    biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was
    exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12,
    4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up
    there.
    
    The merge window also started out pretty painfully, with me hitting a
    couple of bugs in the first couple of days. That's never a good sign,
    since I don't tend to do anything particularly odd, and if I hit bugs
    it means code wasn't tested well enough. In one case it was due to me
    using a simplified configuration that hadn't been tested, and caused
    an odd issue to show up - it happens. But in the other case, it really
    was code that was too recent and too rough and hadn't baked enough.
    The first got fixed, the second just got reverted.
    
    Anyway, despite the rocky start, and the big size, things mostly
    smoothed out towards the end of the merge window. And there's a lot to
    like in 5.3. Too much to do the shortlog with individual commits, of
    course, so appended is the usual "mergelog" of people I merged from
    and a one-liner very high-level "what got merged". For more detail,
    you should go check the git tree.
    
    As always: the people credited below are just the people I pull from,
    there's about 1600 individual developers (for 12500+ non-merge
    commits) in this merge window.
    
    Go test,
    
                Linus
    
  • Linux 5.3-rc1 Debuts As "A Pretty Big Release"

    Just as expected, Linus Torvalds this afternoon issued the first release candidate of the forthcoming Linux 5.3 kernel. It's just not us that have been quite eager for Linux 5.3 and its changes. Torvalds acknowledged in the 5.3-rc1 announcement that this kernel is indeed a big one: "This is a pretty big release, judging by the commit count. Not the biggest ever (that honor still goes to 4.9-rc1, which was exceptionally big), and we've had a couple of comparable ones (4.12, 4.15 and 4.19 were also big merge windows), but it's definitely up there."

  • The New Features & Improvements Of The Linux 5.3 Kernel

    The Linux 5.3 kernel merge window is expected to close today so here is our usual recap of all the changes that made it into the mainline tree over the past two weeks. There is a lot of changes to be excited about from Radeon RX 5700 Navi support to various CPU improvements and ongoing performance work to supporting newer Apple MacBook laptops and Intel Speed Select Technology enablement.

today's howtos and programming bits

  • How to fix Ubuntu live USB not booting
  • How to Create a User Account Without useradd Command in Linux?
  • Container use cases explained in depth
  • Containerization and orchestration concepts explained
  • Set_env.py

    A good practice when writing complicated software is to put in lots of debugging code. This might be extra logging, or special modes that tweak the behavior to be more understandable, or switches to turn off some aspect of your test suite so you can focus on the part you care about at the moment. But how do you control that debugging code? Where are the on/off switches? You don’t want to clutter your real UI with controls. A convenient option is environment variables: you can access them simply in the code, your shell has ways to turn them on and off at a variety of scopes, and they are invisible to your users. Though if they are invisible to your users, they are also invisible to you! How do you remember what exotic options you’ve coded into your program, and how do you easily see what is set, and change what is set?

  • RPushbullet 0.3.2

    A new release 0.3.2 of the RPushbullet package is now on CRAN. RPushbullet is interfacing the neat Pushbullet service for inter-device messaging, communication, and more. It lets you easily send alerts like the one to the left to your browser, phone, tablet, … – or all at once. This is the first new release in almost 2 1/2 years, and it once again benefits greatly from contributed pull requests by Colin (twice !) and Chan-Yub – see below for details.

  • A Makefile for your Go project (2019)

    My most loathed feature of Go was the mandatory use of GOPATH: I do not want to put my own code next to its dependencies. I was not alone and people devised tools or crafted their own Makefile to avoid organizing their code around GOPATH.

  • Writing sustainable Python scripts

    Python is a great language to write a standalone script. Getting to the result can be a matter of a dozen to a few hundred lines of code and, moments later, you can forget about it and focus on your next task. Six months later, a co-worker asks you why the script fails and you don’t have a clue: no documentation, hard-coded parameters, nothing logged during the execution and no sensible tests to figure out what may go wrong. Turning a “quick-and-dirty” Python script into a sustainable version, which will be easy to use, understand and support by your co-workers and your future self, only takes some moderate effort. 

  • Notes to self when using genRSS.py

The Status of Fractional Scaling (HiDPI) Between Windows & Linux

There’s a special type of displays commonly called “HiDPI“, which means that the number of pixels in the screen is doubled (vertically and horizontally), making everything drawn on the screen look sharper and better. One of the most common examples of HiDPI are Apple’s Retina displays, which do come with their desktops and laptops. However, one issue with HiDPI is that the default screen resolutions are too small to be displayed on them, so we need what’s called as “scaling”; Which is simply also doubling the drawn pixels from the OS side so that they can match that of the display. Otherwise, displaying a 400×400 program window on a 3840×2160 display will give a very horrible user experience, so the OS will need to scale that window (and everything) by a factor of 2x, to make it 800×800, which would make it better. Fractional scaling is the process of doing the previous work, but by using fractional scaling numbers (E.g 1.25, 1.4, 1.75.. etc), so that they can be customized better according to the user’s setup and needs. Now where’s the issue, you may ask? Windows operating system has been supporting such kind of displays natively for a very long time, but Linux distributions do lack a lot of things in this field. There are many drawbacks, issues and other things to consider. This article will take you in a tour about that. Read more Also: Vulkan 1.1.116 Published With Subgroup Size Control Extension

Android Leftovers