Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 22 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Matt Asay: Is there money in them thar open source hills?

Filed under
OSS

Will people pay seven figures-plus for open source? Of course. Just ask SugarCRM, Red Hat, JBoss, or MySQL. Open source does not equal poverty; open source equals massive opportunity. Five years from now, no one will bother selling proprietary bits anymore.

Linux Options Omitted From Vista Survey

Filed under
Microsoft

It's either the Microsoft way or the highway for computer users according to a survey about the economic impact the Vista operating system could have in Europe.

Novell to launch quick-response Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Novell plans an October launch for its Suse Linux Enterprise Real-Time product, an operating system geared for Wall Street traders and others who watch every microsecond of the clock.

ATI 8.29.6 Display Drivers

Filed under
Software

Once again, it is the time of the month when new ATI display drivers are presented and it's now the task of Phoronix to evaluate this latest package. Over the past several months, we have seen a horde of improvements. Today with the release of the 8.29.6 fglrx drivers there have not been many changes that affect the end-user, but still there are some items worth mentioning.

Point, click, root: System exploitation with open tools

Filed under
Software

IT managers face a problem determining what products and policies are best to properly secure their network. The problem with many security products is that it is hard to validate their claims. Penetration testing is a process for testing the security of networks by imitating an attacker. Conducting a successful penetration test involves a great deal of knowledge and a wide variety of software, including some of the following open source tools.

Open Source, Linux, marketing and public perception

Filed under
OSS

Anyone could have guessed that my undergrad thesis work is centered on Open Source; more accurately, we deal with devising strategies for Linux and Open Source adoption and penetration growth in the SMB sector of Guayaquil, Ecuador. Most of the conclusions are not Earth-shattering revelations, but things we already know. But there’s one particular thing you and me know for certain… yet we’re doing practically nothing about it!

Howto switch from Linux to Windows - a users experience

Filed under
Linux

What if the first OS you’ve ever used wasn’t MS Dos or Win95 but some kind of Unix-based free system like BSD or Linux? This is a text about a guy who has always used Linux and learned working with it when he was a young man when he had to use it at work. Imagine Linux is the standard OS and Microsoft is a small company offering so called MS Windows XP.

Flexibility key to new Mambo release

Filed under
Software

Popular open source content management system (CMS) Mambo today released version 4.6. This is the first major release in almost two years. So, what's new in version 4.6?

Proftpd Server Installation and Configuration

Filed under
HowTos

ProFTPD is a ftp server written for use on Unix and Unix-a-like operating systems, there is no support for native use under Microsoft Windows.

Mandriva aims for the enterprise

Filed under
Interviews
MDV

Q&A: Following the launch of Corporate Server 4.0, ZDNet UK spoke to Mandriva chief executive François Bancilhon about how Mandriva plans to win over the enterprise

How To Capture High Resolution Screen Shots In Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever needed to capture a screen shot of something in Linux and 72dpi was not high enough resolution. I recently found myself in this situation trying to capture some images of the great screen savers that come with most Linux distributions. The way you do this is easier than it first appears.

DIY document management system with Simple Groupware

Filed under
HowTos

For most people, document management systems are overkill for keeping track of their documents. Usually, you don't need software that allows you to define elaborate document workflows or detailed version tracking. What you might need is a simple system that you can use to access and edit your documents on multiple machines, and then sync them with a file repository on a remote server. Simple Groupware allows you to do just that, and it has a couple more clever tricks as well.

Securing Your Server With A Host-based Intrusion Detection System

Filed under
Linux
Security
HowTos

This article shows how to install and run OSSEC HIDS, an Open Source Host-based Intrusion Detection System. It performs log analysis, integrity checking, rootkit detection, time-based alerting and active response. It helps you detect attacks, software misuse, policy violations and other forms of inappropriate activities.

NSW govt signals desktop Linux needs

Filed under
Linux

The NSW state government yesterday went to market for its desktop, notebook and small server needs for at least the next three years, designating the ability to purchase Linux-based systems as "highly desirable".

Torvalds talks like a pirate

Filed under
Misc

Linux creator Linus Torvalds today signalled his enjoyment of the annual "Talk Like a Pirate Day" festivities, using the nautical lexicon to launch an update to the kernel at the heart of his open source operating system.

Is Xgl Really Worth It?

Filed under
Software

Perhaps I am missing something here, but why in the world is anyone worried about whether or not Xgl is outdoing the efforts of Microsoft's Vista? Seriously, we already know that Vista has problems of its own, and this is not even counting the fact that Xgl outperforms Vista's Aero hands down without the need for extra video card upgrades (without some tweaking, that is).

Linux: 2.6.18 Kernel Released

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds announced the release of the 2.6.18 Linux kernel, following the previous stable kernel release by three months. He exclaimed, "she's good to go, hoist anchor!", the second year in a row that a kernel release has coincided with 'Talk Like A Pirate Day.'

Avast!

Filed under
MDV

Aye, ’tis plain sailin’ fer 2007 an’ no mistake. Cap’n ‘Fearsome’ Barth an’ his horde o’ hard-drinkin’, wench-baitin’ below decks swabbers ‘ave removed the last o’ th’ mice, rats, termites &c from their stations chewing at the timbers o’ th’ good ship Mandriva, an’ we be ready to send ‘er out to the cruel ocean waves right soon like. Arrrrr.

Kernel Debugging Techniques

Filed under
HowTos

Often the pivotal factor in achieving development timetables comes down to one's efficiency in finding and fixing bugs. Debugging inside the Linux kernel can be quite challenging. No matter how you approach it, kernel debugging will always be complex. This chapter examines some of the complexities and presents ideas and methods to improve your debugging skills inside the kernel and device drivers.

Open source software takes on giants

Filed under
OSS

Free and open source software is fast taking on licenced software giants worldover, and in India too, it is catching the fancy of IT industry.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Python Programming Leftovers

  • Cogito, Ergo Sumana: Futureproofing Your Python Tools

    The people who maintain Python and key Python platforms want to help you protect the code you write and depend on. [...] Publishing that package is a great way of making it so other people can run and deploy it, even within other parts of your organization. But -- who actually has the keys to the castle? Who can upload a new version, or delete a version that has a problem? You should probably make sure multiple people have either "owner" or "maintainer" privileges on the project on PyPI. And you should review your project security history display, which lists sensitive events (such as "file removed from release version 1.0.1") in your PyPI user account and your PyPI project. We just added this display, so you can look at things that have happened in your user account or project, and check for signs someone's stolen your credentials.

  • py3status v3.20 – EuroPython 2019 edition

    Shame on me to post this so long after it happened… Still, that’s a funny story to tell and a lot of thank you to give so let’s go!

  • Finding Python Developers for Your Startup

    Recently I stumble across a situation while I was helping out for one of the events for JuniorDev SG. There was not a lot of Python developers and some of my other developer's friend. Said that they hardly encounter any developer friends who are using Python for their work. It begins during a conversation, where one of the attendees for a JuniorDev SG event. Approached me to search for Python developers to work for their startup based in Singapore.

Geary 3.34 Debuts with Deeper GNOME Contacts Integration, Other Changes

The Geary email client has issued a brand new release, and in this post I tell you a bit about it. Geary 3.34.0 — you may recall that Geary switched to following GNOME numbering last year — is the latest update to this web-mail friendly mail tool, and there’s healthy dose of improvement on offer, as noted in the release notes. Among them is deeper integration with GNOME Contacts. Geary’s in-app contacts pop-over now supports adding and editing contacts stored in the GNOME Contacts app, and is able to auto-complete email addresses based on data from contacts too. Serial typo-makers like me will appreciate the spell checker now covering the mail composer’s subject line; while the addition of support for Outlook-specific email attachments (TNEF) will please those who regularly run in to issues on that front. Other changes in Geary 3.34.0 include “a substantial number” of server compatibility improvements, background syncing tweaks, and other bug fixes. Read more

today's howtos

Best free Linux firewalls of 2019: go beyond Iptables for desktops and servers

Linux distros will often come with at least a basic firewall bundled with it. Often this won't be active by default so will need to be activated. Additionally this will likely be the standard Iptables supplied, even though less experienced users may struggle with it. UFW - Uncomplicated Firewall is also bundled with some distros, and aims to make the process simpler. However, there are distros and applications out there that can cater for the more advanced user and the less experienced one, making it easier to setup and configure a firewall that works for your needs. Some, like ClearOS build it directly into the operating system as part of its security focus, but most other options would be applications that aim to block rogue IPs, monitor ports, and prevent otherwise prevent bad packets from interfering with your machine. For most home users there are few actual settings that need to be customized, so simple apps can be popular, but for those looking to manage their machine as a server, additional controls and advanced command options will tend to be the more welcome. Read more