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About Tux Machines

Monday, 16 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNU Tools Cauldron 2014 videos posted online Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 7:24am
Story Pisi Linux 1.1 KDE Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 7:18am
Story ReactOS Finally Supports Reading NTFS Volumes Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 7:17am
Story Sweet Spot: A visual look at the delicious history of Android Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 6:59am
Story openSUSE 13.2 and Fedora 21 Beta Released Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 6:59am
Story Nexus 9 Review: A Powerful Tablet…for Android Die-Hards Only Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 6:55am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 9:44pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 9:36pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 9:35pm
Story An open source tool to share data from Europe’s libraries and museums Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 9:28pm

The Future of Hardware Compatibility Lists in Linux

Filed under
Linux

A while back, I made a comment with regard to how great it would be to have a single, collective HCL (hardware compatibility list) for all of the popular Linux distributions. At the time, I felt very strongly that if we had a one single collective database of hardware that was known to work with the latest distributions, life would be a lot easier.

Kingston HyperX 2GB PC2-8000

Filed under
Hardware

You want fast memory? Kingston has fast memory! Though not usually touted as the company to offer killer gaming memory, the HyperX PC2-8000 kit proves to be one of the fastest kits we've tested!

Book Review: How to do everything with PHP and MySQL

Filed under
Reviews

If you're planning to take a stab at being an open source programmer then there are harder ways to do it than to start with PHP, MySQl and Apache. This book, How to do everything with PHP & MySQL pulls together both skills into one book which, frankly, makes sense.

Linux v. Microsoft: Third World Showdown

Filed under
OS

Those of you who have followed Silicon Hutong for a while will know that I have long been a Linux-skeptic, believing firmly that despite its obvious advantages on servers, Linux would never be in a position to displace Windows on the desktop.

Well, I was wrong.

Enable password aging on Linux systems

Filed under
HowTos

Password aging is a mechanism that allows the system to enforce a certain lifetime for passwords. While this may be moderately inconvenient for users, it ensures that passwords are changed occasionally, which is a good security practice. Most Linux distributions do not enable password aging by default, but it's very easy to enable.

Jeff Waugh on Ubuntu: Community Building for Human Beings

Filed under
Ubuntu

At the 2006 Open Source Convention, Jeff Waugh, who works on Ubuntu business and community development as an employee of Canonical, describes the process by which Ubuntu's team went about creating a community with shared values and vision.

New computer OS runs on your Web browser

Filed under
Misc

When it comes to personal computer operating systems or an ''OS,'' you can count them on one hand. There's the Windows OS that you find on more personal computers than any other. Then there's Apple Computer's Macintosh OS called OS X. The third big name in operating systems is Linux. I recently found a new remote OS. This is not an OS that resides on your computer. No, the OS resides on a remote server. The entire OS runs within an ordinary Web browser.

Making wireless work in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

One of the greatest new features for laptop users in Ubuntu is network-manager. With this shiny new application it is finally easy to connect your Ubuntu system to any wireless network. Where previously you had to jump through hoops to do WPA or 802.1x authentication, network manager makes this completely transparent.

GNU/Linux vs. Mac: Why Apple will not dominate?

Filed under
OS

At this point there are really only three major contenders on the desktop market; Windows, GNU/Linux and Mac OS X. It is a known fact that Windows still holds the vast majority of the market and Mac OS X is tied to computers made only by one manufacturer.

Desktop memory usage

Filed under
Software

This was actually supposed to be a follow-up to my tests of startup performance of various desktop environments, primarily KDE of course. I decided I should publish at least a shorter variant with all the numbers and some conclusions. You can do your own analyses of the numbers if you will.

How to set up a VoIP service with Xorcom Rapid, Asterisk PBX and *starShop-OSS

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

In this howto I will show you step-by-step how to successfully set up a long distance calls service in your Cybercafé, using open source software. The main element is *starShop-OSS, an open source application designed to monitor and bill, in real time, calls made via Asterisk PBX. This service is commonly called callshop or taxiphone.

XenEnterprise 3.0 Works Well Within Limits

Filed under
Reviews

XenSource offers its first product, which is the best Xen virtualization solution eWEEK Labs has tested, although it's not yet ready to take on VMware.

The ever growing Monster

Filed under
Just talk

A simple oversight may cause some wondering WTF? I’ve been spending most of my time getting my Debian installation up and running with what I need. After a week or so I am really happy with it. Then the other day, I was trying to install something and I had run out of disk space! 23 gigs used already? for Linux?

What you should (and shouldn't) expect from 64-bit Linux

Filed under
Linux

So you just bought and assembled a brand-new AMD64 workstation. The only decision that remains is whether to install a 64-bit Linux distribution, or stick with comfortable, tried-and-true IA-32. If you are seeking an easy answer to that question, I can't help you. Running 64-bit Linux has its pros and cons. Unfortunately, a lot of the cons are out of your hands -- but they're not really Linux's fault, either.

Open source stacks move into critical operations

Filed under
Interviews

The open source stack is moving to the core of data centers -- to a place where it's responsible for handling critical parts of business operations. Support for these applications is paramount for IT departments and absolutely essential to the enterprises that use them, according to a report from The 451 Group, based in New York.

Something Out of Nothing - Ubuntu Dapper Drake (6.06 LTS) on a Packard Bell iMedia 1307

Filed under
Ubuntu

I don’t think I’ve ever seen a set of desktop computers in a more wretched state than those I saw this morning. It was going to be something of a miracle if they started up; however they did. Still, the result was not particularly pleasing. I decided to install and see if Linux could bring something as wretched as this back to life.

Which way, open-sourcers?

Filed under
OSS

Earlier this year, I wrote that the General Public License version 3 (GPLv3) would bring the open-source and free-software communities to a critical juncture. While some scoffed, the decision of the Free Software Foundation (FSF) to discount the concerns of commercial open-sourcers with the latest draft of GPLv3 threatens to split the community and slow the growth of free/libre/open-source software (FLOSS).

Educational Institutions Adopt Red Hat Linux

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat announced the growing adoption of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Network solutions by several higher education institutions, including Wake Forest University, the University of Washington and Vanderbilt University.

Secure your Wi-Fi traffic using FOSS utilities

Filed under
HowTos

A recent Slashdot item on Wi-Fi security was a timely reminder of the weaknesses of default Wi-Fi encryption protocols, and the dangers of using unencrypted, public Wi-Fi connections. Fortunately, you can use FOSS utilities to securely tunnel your Wi-Fi connection sessions and protect your Web and email traffic.

EU warns Microsoft against tying security upgrades in Vista system

Filed under
Microsoft

European Commission on Tuesday warned US- computer giant Microsoft against bundling security upgrades into its new Windows Vista operating system.

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Linux commands to display your hardware information

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