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Monday, 23 Sep 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux 3.19-rc2 Is A Tiny Release Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 9:44am
Story What will 2015 bring for the open source cloud? Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 9:35am
Story Five Great Applications For Systems Admins Roy Schestowitz 29/12/2014 - 9:26am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 10:55pm
Story Sdparm & ddpt Linux Disk Utilities Updated Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 10:19pm
Story Crouton for Chromebooks: Run Ubuntu in a browser tab Rianne Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 9:50pm
Story Popcorn Time Makes Watching Movies Safer with Integrated VPN Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 11:24am
Story 4MRecover 11.0 Beta OS Can Help Users Recover Lost Files Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 11:19am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 9:15am
Story Will New Google Android Live TV Outfox Apple? Roy Schestowitz 28/12/2014 - 8:55am

Looking into the FSF's BadVista campaign

Filed under
Microsoft

BadVista is the latest in a series of activist campaigns launched by the Free Software Foundation (FSF)in the last eight months. It follows the highly successful Defective By Design campaign against so-called Digital Rights Management (DRM) technologies, and an unnamed effort to encourage the activist media to make free software part of their agenda.

Hans Reiser Selling Company

Filed under
Reiser
Interviews

Hans Reiser, the prominent Bay Area Linux programmer charged with murdering his wife, says he's seeking to sell off his open-source file system company, Namesys, to help pay mounting legal costs.

ATI AYiR 2006

Filed under
Software

Earlier this month our NVIDIA AYiR (A Year in Review) 2006 article was published. Now it is ATI Technologies turn as we see how they have revolutionized their much-debated Linux fglrx display drivers. We also benchmarked all twelve of their drivers from this year and see what the ATI/AMD camp has in store for next year. Without further ado, we present the ATI AYiR 2006!

Creating Partitions in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Partitions are physical or logical portions of a disk; a filesystem is the logical arrangement of data on a physical or logical partition so that your computer system can access and store data there.

Librarians stake their future on open source

Filed under
OSS

A group of librarians at the Georgia Public Library Service has developed an open source, enterprise-class library management system that may revolutionize the way large-scale libraries are run.

Snowballz: Snowball Throwing RTS

Filed under
Gaming

If you're in a local that's missing out on snow this year, give Snowballz a try. Drive your penguin horde against the opponents and freeze them with snowballs.

More Here.

Linux powers controllable Christmas lights for charity

Filed under
Linux

Alek Komarnitsky's controllable Christmas lights started out as a hoax, but now Komarnitsky is using Linux to power the controllable Christmas lights for real. Since Komarnitsky is based in Lafayette, Colo., just an hour or so away from my home in Denver, I decided to drive up and see the lights for myself. I toured Komarnitsky's home and looked over his controllable Christmas light setup, and talked to him about the history of the project.

Assessing the scalability of open source

Filed under
OSS

Small businesses with small budgets can save a lot of money by deploying open-source software — at least in theory. Also in theory, large companies stand to save even more because they need so many more copies of each software program. But is open source really scalable enough to grow with your company? Let's look at some of the pros and cons.

Has the Desktop Linux Bubble Burst?

Filed under
Linux

In 2002, both KDE and GNOME released their last major revisions; KDE released KDE 3.0 on 3rd April, while GNOME followed shortly after with GNOME 2.0 on 27th June. For the Linux desktop, therefore, 2002 was an important year. Since then, we have continiously been fed point releases which added bits of functionaility and speed improvements, but no major revision has yet seen the light of day. What's going on?

Women flock to Linux talkfest

Filed under
Linux

Female registrations have hit an all time high for Linux.conf.au (LCA) to be held in Sydney next year. More than 50 women have signed up to the traditionally male dominated event, which represents approximately 10% of the overall number of registrations.

KVM Virtualization solution to be tightly integrated with Linux kernel 2.6.20

Filed under
Linux

There is good news on the horizon... which is that Linus Torvalds has merged the KVM code - which is the Kernel Virtual Machine Module in the kernel source tree leading to Linux Kernel 2.6.20. This opens up a lot of avenues as far as Linux is concerned.

Kurt Pfeifle (pipitas): klik service gaining new features (adding some more user friendliness)

Filed under
Software

probono klik's has added a few cool hacks to the klik server. One is that all package recipes which are auto-created from the Debian repositories and klik's "server side apt" do now display version numbers. So if you browse the klik recipe repository, you'll now see how much net load you'll get in a minute.

Jono Bacon: Exaile

Filed under
Software

A mail to the LUGRadio email address pointed to a media player called Exaile. It is a GTK based media player using GStreamer, written in Python, and aims to be the same kind of kitchen-sink media player that Amarok is to the KDE desktop. So, I gave it a whirl, and I am pretty impressed.

Activism and Promotion

Filed under
OSS

Something that is really counterproductive in many Open Source communities are people who are so rabidly fanatical about one line of thinking that they try to pressure everyone into their line of thinking.

Book review: How Linux Works

Filed under
Reviews

Ok, so you are a Linux user or a power user. The question then is what does it take to become a valid, omnipotent, root-enabled superuser? One potential answer is read the book How Linux Works, by Brian Ward and published by No Starch Press, by the last word of the last chapter you may or may not have been transformed, a wizard waiting to be born.

Jeremy Allison Has Resigned from Novell to Protest MS Patent Deal

Filed under
SUSE

The legendary Jeremy Allison (of Samba fame) has resigned from Novell in protest over the Microsoft-Novell patent agreement, which he calls "a mistake" which will be "damaging to Novell's success in the future."

digiKam Lets You Take Your Tags With You

Filed under
Software

I'm a digiKam user and overall I've been happy with it, but I've always wanted tagging to be applied to the picture itself and not just the digiKam database. So when I saw that digiKam 0.9 was recently released I hurried over to check out the new features.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Fix Firefox Backspace to Take You to the Previous Page

  • Installing Popular Applications On Your Ubuntu Desktop With Automatix2
  • Blogging from GNOME with Drivel : Ubuntu
  • Mount and Unmout ISO images without burning them
  • Rescuing a system with massively broken filesystem permissions
  • Install ImageMagick 5.5.7 on Debian
  • Backing up your system with free software
  • Linux-Windows Single Sign-On

How To Compile A Kernel - The Debian (Sarge) Way

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on Debian Sarge systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.

Network Bandwidth Monitoring Tools

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu
HowTos

This is list of Network Bandwidth Monitoring Tools for Ubuntu Users includes bmon bwbar,bwm,bwm-ng,iftop,iperf,ipfm speedometer, cbm, ibmonitor, pktstat, mactrack, MRTG, Cacti. This tutorial also contains how to install and configure each tool with examples and screenshots.This is very useful for all Linux users and admins.

Read Full article here

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More in Tux Machines

Introduction to the Linux chgrp and newgrp commands

In a recent article, I introduced the chown command, which is used for modifying ownership of files on systems. Recall that ownership is the combination of the user and group assigned to an object. The chgrp and newgrp commands provide additional help for managing files that need to maintain group ownership. It is important to understand how to manage users, groups, and permissions. It is also good to know a few alternative ways to work around problems you might encounter since not all environments are set up the same way. Read more

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Linux-Powered BeagleBoard AI Comes With Debian Out-of-the-box

Linux-powered BeabgleBoard AI Single Board Computer (SBC) has been launched by the BeagleBoard foundation at a $125 price tag. The new SBC runs Debian GNU/Linux out of the box. The organization says that the new SBC fills the gap between small Raspberry Pi-like computers and more powerful desktop machines. The BeagleBoard AI was shown way back in February 2019 and now it has finally been launched. In my experience, Beagleboard computers are really awesome devices. We have even included the original Beagleboard, the Beagleboard Black and the X15 on our list of “Best Raspberry-Pi Alternatives.” Read more

Redcore Linux 1908 LXQt

Redcore is a Gentoo-based project which strives to make it easy to install the distribution and immediately have access to a pre-configured desktop environment. Redcore is available in two editions, KDE Plasma and LXQt, and offers builds for 64-bit (x86_64) machines exclusively. The latest version of Redcore Linux has shifted from using Gentoo's Stable branch as its upstream source to Gentoo Testing. Software now flows from Gentoo Testing, into Redcore's Testing repository, and then into Redcore Stable where most Redcore users will access it. The Redcore ISO files are relatively large with both editions being 3.4GB downloads. Given the similarities in size, I decided to try the LXQt edition. Booting from the Redcore media brings up a graphical login screen with a mostly-white background. We can sign into the live desktop using the username and password "redcore". The default wallpaper is mostly white with abstract lines. The combination makes for a bright screen populated with harsh lines that I personally found unpleasant and I soon switch to another background. There are two icons on the LXQt desktop. One opens the Calamares installer and the other is labelled "Ask for help". Clicking the latter icon causes LXQt to pop-up an error saying the selected icon is an invalid desktop entry file. Clicking the installer icon brings up a prompt asking if we would like to open or execute the installer's desktop file. Along the bottom of the screen we find a panel containing the application menu, task switcher and system tray. Read more