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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 21 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OpenELEC 4.0 Beta 7 Linux Distro Is Based on XBMC 13.0 RC "Gotham" Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2014 - 2:47pm
Story Debian drops the SPARC architecture Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2014 - 2:36pm
Blog entry Tux Machines This Month Roy Schestowitz 29/04/2014 - 2:34pm
Story Debian adopts a code of conduct Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2014 - 2:28pm
Story Ubuntu for Android to Be Retired Soon Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2014 - 2:15pm
Story 9 productivity hacks of a tech leader Roy Schestowitz 29/04/2014 - 2:08pm
Story Getting Things GNOME: Summer is coming! Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2014 - 2:06pm
Story Wind River Linux gains EAL4 security and upgraded CGL version Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2014 - 1:59pm
Story Updated Debian 7: 7.5 released Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2014 - 8:24am
Story X.Org Server 1.16 ABI Breakage Causes Concern Rianne Schestowitz 29/04/2014 - 8:15am

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A New Breed of Puppy: Grafpup Linux 1.0.2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Grafpup is a tiny distro based on Puppy Linux focused moreso on graphic applications. It comes in a 75 mb download, similarly to Puppy, but it has taken out some of the general purpose, games, and multimedia applications and added more graphic apps. We test drove the newest version, Grafpup Linux 1.0.2, announced just today. Aimed at the professional graphic artist, most applications were quite useful even to a layperson like myself. When a distro comes in 75 mb, is chocked full of useful utilities and apps, and still includes gimp - you know they are doing something right.

CLI Magic: MultiTail follows files in style

Filed under
HowTos

Troubleshooting often involves having to watch logfiles in real time. That means using tail or a similar utility to see new messages that are added to a logfile by Apache, MySQL, X.org, or whatever program you're trying to deal with at the time. While tail is usually readily available on *nix systems, I prefer to use MultiTail whenever possible. It has some features that you won't find in tail, such as filtering and a color display, and MultiTail allows you to follow the output from a command as easily as following a logfile.

Reduce the Risk - hire programmers from open source

Filed under
OSS

In the wake of open source, traditional hiring practices seem like an unnecessarily risky way to hire new employees, especially for small teams where each hire can make it or break it. Why bet the composition of your collective on abstract indicators, hearsay, and a biased bio?

Bloke runs 100 operating systems at once

Filed under
Linux

A GEEZER on a Linux forum is claiming that he has managed to get more than 100 operating systems to run at the same time on one machine.

Network Monitoring with Ethereal

Filed under
Software

If you're familiar with network analysis tools but still haven't taken Ethereal for a spin, here's a quick look at what it can do.

How shells call other programs

Filed under
HowTos

An article about How Linux or UNIX Understand which program to run got picked up by a few dozen RSS feeds recently. It's not a bad article.

It's actually slightly incorrect though.

Test drive: Kororaa

Filed under
Reviews

Ever wanted to try Gentoo, but you didn't want to spend hours compiling to get a working installation? Kororaa may be the answer. It's a great tool to get a working Gentoo installation, rather than a distinct distro in its own right. It takes some of the complexity out of installing Gentoo, but still provides the advantages of Gentoo's Portage system and extensive package availability.

Open Source convention concludes

Filed under
OSS

The Education Forum drew healthy and vigorous debate at the three-day LinuxAsia 2006 convention, the region's premier Open Source conference and expo, which concluded here on Friday.

First Look at VectorLinux SOHO 5.1.1 Deluxe

Filed under
Reviews

When you think of Linux, what distribution comes immediately to mind? The answer will most likely be different depending on whom you ask, and for different reasons. For me, it's Slackware Linux. The reason is that it's not only the oldest surviving Linux distribution on the planet, but it's also one of the best desktop distributions going... in my book at least. With that being said, I introduce to you VectorLinux.

VMware to test new high-end product

Filed under
Software

VMware will begin broadly testing a new version of its premium ESX Server product next week, a move that comes shortly after the EMC subsidiary began offering its basic server software package for free. Product delivery, however, could occur several months later than planned.

Also: Virtualization on Low-End Hardware

Open Source is the future as Firefox storms ahead

Filed under
OSS

Even as the hype and hoopla surrounding the release of Internet Explorer 7.0 continues to circulate online, it is Firefox, which is quietly doing a great job and is in fact generating more interest that anything that is on the anvil from Redmond at the moment.

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Alien Arena 2006: Gold Edition released!

Filed under
Gaming

COR Entertainment officially announces the release of Alien Arena 2006: Gold Edition, the free online multiplayer FPS game at http://red.planetarena.org.

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Video of Novell Technology Preview

Filed under
SUSE

Here's a coupla short clips showing off Novell's new XGL desktop.

First One.

Second One.

On a Global SCALE

Filed under
Linux

I'll tell you one thing about the Southern California Linux Expo: there is certainly no shortage of enthusiasm amongst the attendees. During Aaron Seigo's talk this morning on the progress of the KDE 4 desktop, specifically the Plasma prject he is working with, I nearly fainted from lack of food.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Stadia Scepticism, Epic, Linux Gaming Report and More

  • Stadia is about the future of YouTube, not gaming

    Yesterday, Google announced plans for a new game-streaming service called Stadia. Besides the logo, the controller, and a single game — Doom Eternal — the announcement left us with more questions than answers. Primary in my mind has been the query of why Google needs to be in the gaming business at all. Isn’t it enough to dominate web search, ads, and browsers, smartphone operating systems, and maps? What part of our lives does Google not want to know about? And then it dawned on me that we might be looking at it from the wrong perspective: what if Stadia isn’t a case of Google aggressively entering a new business sphere, but rather a defensive one to protect its existing kingdom?

  • Google Stadia's Grand Vision for Gaming Clashes With America's Shitty Internet

    Slow speeds, usage caps, and overage fees could mar the long-awaited arrival of game streams.

  • Slow Broadband, Usage Caps Could Mar Google Stadia's Game Streaming Ambitions
    I can remember being at E3 in 2000 and being pitched on the idea of a sort of "dumb terminal" for gaming. As in, you wouldn't need a computer or game console in your home, since all of the actual game processing would be accomplished in the cloud then streamed to your TV via broadband. Most of these early pitches never materialized. Initially because cloud computing simply wasn't fully baked yet, but also thanks to America' shoddy broadband. Cloud-based game streaming is something the industry has continued to push for, though nobody has yet to truly crack the market. Onlive probably tried the hardest, though again a lack of real cloud horsepower and sketchy residential broadband prevented the service from truly taking off. Undaunted, Google took to the stage at the Game Developers Conference to unveil Stadia, a looming game streaming platform that will let gamers play top-shelf games on any hardware with a Chrome browser. Google insists that the service, when it launches this summer, will be able to drive games at up to 4K resolution and 60 frames per second seamlessly between multiple devices with no need for game consoles, high-end PCs, loading times, or installs. The whole presentation is available here:
  • Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney on PC store moderation: ‘We’re not in the porn business’

    Last year, Valve announced a hands-off approach to Steam that would allow anything onto the platform “except for things that we decide are illegal, or straight up trolling.” In addition to the Rape Day controversy, that policy has pushed Valve to take hardline stances on content revolving around child exploitation, school shootings, and most recently around tributes memorializing the New Zealand shooter. Sweeney, it seems, does not see the value it trying to protect content that pushes up against that amorphous line.

  • Linux Gaming Report and Purism Librem 15 | Choose Linux 5
    Jason goes deeper down the rabbit hole by exploring the state of Steam gaming on 9 different Linux distributions. Find out how Fedora compares to Pop!_OS. Plus, first impressions of Purism’s brand new Librem 15 v4 laptop.
  • Objects in Space released for Linux on Steam, needs you to disable Steam Play
    While the Linux version has been up on GOG for a little while, Steam was left a bit behind. Now the Linux version on Steam has been officially announced and released but there's an issue with Steam Play.
  • First-person roguelike 'Barony' released the Myths & Outcasts DLC recently, also now on GOG
    Barony is a game I hadn't honestly touched in a very long time, which all changed with the Myths & Outcasts DLC that released last month giving new ways to play. It's also now on GOG, so that's great.
  • Chasm, the adventure platformer from Bit Kid just had a big update giving more variety
    Chasm, the crowdfunded adventure platformer continues to see great post-release support with the latest big free update out now. While it's not a personal favourite of mine (I much prefer Dead Cells honestly), it's still a reasonably good game overall. In fact, it's far better than a lot of action/adventure platformers and it does look great.
  • Counter-Strike: Global Offensive now has much better queue times for Danger Zone
    Following on from the tweak to Danger Zone to focus more on duos, Valve are still tweaking their Battle Royale mode in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive as well as the game as a whole. Firstly, for Danger Zone you should now see much better queue times for matchmaking. Before this patch, I could easily see queue times around 3 to 5 minutes (often the latter) even with a lot of people online which is not ideal and frankly that makes me (and no doubt others) get bored and look to play something else. Since this patch has dropped, I've played a good 30-40 matches and not a single one has hit even 2 minutes queue time (under 1 minute mostly now!) which is a pretty huge improvement.

Nuvola: Linux Desktop Music Player for Streaming Services

Take a look at features and installation of Nuvola Music Player, a music player for Linux desktop that plays streaming music services. Read more

LibreOffice 6.2.2 Office Suite Released with More Than 50 Fixes, Download Now

While LibreOffice 6.1 is still the recommended version for those who want a more stable and well-tested LibreOffice office suite, LibreOffice 6.2.2 is here for technology enthusiasts and early adopters who want to get a taste of the latest new features and innovations in the free and open-source office suite used by millions of computer users worldwide. "LibreOffice 6.2.2 represents the bleeding edge in term of features for open source office suites, and as such is not optimized for enterprise-class deployments, where features are less important than robustness. Users wanting a more mature version can download LibreOffice 6.1.5, which includes some months of back-ported fixes.," said Italo Vignoli. Read more

New PocketBeagle pocket sized Linux computer $29.95

If you are searching for an affordable and small yet powerful Linux computer, you may be interested in the new PocketBeagle Linux computer which offers just that for $29.95. The tiny computer is now available to purchase directly from the Adafruit online store and offers a powerful 1GHz AM3358 powered Linux single board computer with a tiny form factor and open source architecture. Read more