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About Tux Machines

Friday, 26 Apr 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tor, trust and the NSA Rianne Schestowitz 20/07/2014 - 3:08am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:49pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:49pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:48pm
Story [Pictures] Samsung Z (SM-Z910F) Tizen in Gold Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:27pm
Story Chromecast Now Lets Users Move Android Content to Their TVs Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:10pm
Story Faults in Linux 2.6 Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 9:07pm
Story KDecoration2 – The road ahead Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 8:57pm
Story Kerala Legislature moves to open source software; LibreOffice Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 8:09pm
Story Could we See a Linux Tablet Brought to Life with Ubuntu Touch? Roy Schestowitz 19/07/2014 - 7:47pm

The (Almost) Perfect Setup - Debian Sarge (3.1) On A Strato Dedicated-Server

Filed under
HowTos

Based and abuttet to the HowTo - The Perfect Setup Debian Sarge (3.1) - of Falko Timme I wrote this HowTo for STRATO-Server, because Strato has some specifics in it´s Debian Sarge (3.1) - Image.

Konqcast at KDE://radio

Filed under
KDE

At the recent KDE Four Core meeting Aaron Seigo interviewed a number of the developers. You can hear them now on the new KDE://radio site.

Gaming on Linux - Endgame:Singularity

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

With it's retro interface and fast paced gameplay Endgame Singularity offers up a seriously interesting take on "hacker" simulation gaming. Instead of playing a human intruding on systems you take on the role of an A.I. that has just gained sentience. Your goal is to stay alive by avoiding detection while furthering your research to escape from a hostile earth.

Tested: Suse Linux Enterprise Server 10

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

We tested SLES 10 by installing it on a twin Xeon server system fitted with 3.6GHz processors and 4GB or RAM. The Suse setup tool detected our server's LSI SCSI controller and the pre-existing installation of Windows.

Smart Package Manager study cases: inconclusive!

Filed under
Software

Smart PM is advocated by a lot of people for using it instead of APT, YUM, YaST2, or whatever else. I tried it once and it worked well. However, I was not impressed that much. Besides, where's the proof it actually performs better?

IOSN releases free open standards book

Filed under
OSS

Many governments and organisations are moving towards open standards and frameworks. To assist users in understanding open standards the International Open Source Network (IOSN) has released FOSS: Open Standards, the latest in its series of "e-Primer" books.

SCO will appeal the gutting of its lawsuit against IBM

Filed under
Legal

Utah's SCO Group is appealing a federal magistrate's gutting of its $5 billion lawsuit against IBM, hoping to salvage the tens of millions of dollars it has spent litigating the case over the past three years.

Which linux distro..?

Filed under
Linux

I’ve been using linux for at least four years now, and I’ve tried out most of the top distributions available. This guide is for noobs to decide which distribution of linux to use.

Shuttleworth discusses the future of open source

Filed under
OSS

Despite being on record as disliking public speaking, Mark Shuttleworth was in Dublin last month to give the keynote speech at this year's ApacheCon Europe. His theme was the future direction of open source software (OSS), and the issues developers should focus on to ensure the OSS movement’s continued success.

Book Review: A Practical Guide to Red Hat Linux

Filed under
Reviews

I'm overwhelmed. This is the book I wanted when I started learning about Unix. OK, Linux didn't exist then, but if it had existed, and if I were sticking my toes in it, this would have been THE book.

Enterprise Unix Roundup: Lotus Notes, Firefix 2, Win98, Sun

We fondly remember Sam Palmisano's promise more than two years ago to have all IBM employees running Linux on their desktops the end of 2005. We weren't surprised that the actual rollout was quietly swept under the carpet and did not occur.

What makes open-source developers tick?

Filed under
OSS

A doctoral thesis submitted to the University of Zurich in Switzerland has focused on the question of what makes developers of open-source software tick. The answer is not much of a surprise:

A first look at SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

The newest SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop, version 10, is so close to being done that you can almost taste it. Novell released the gold master last week to its partners, and the server version, SLES (SUSE Linux Enterprise Server), based on the same code, is also almost ready for release. This is an early review of the new version of SLED 10 (SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop).

Smart Package Manager: a better mousetrap

Filed under
Software

The Smart Package Manager hopes to beat the native package management applications for distributions like Red Hat, SUSE, and Debian at their own game. Still in beta, it has support for most major GNU/Linux package and repository formats. Smart introduces many innovative and useful ideas, but its killer feature is the algorithms it uses to select packages and versions.

KOffice Version 1.5.2 Released

Filed under
Software

The KOffice team is pleased to announce KOffice version 1.5.2. This is mainly a bugfix release but also contains numerous translation updates. Especially KWord, KSpread and Kexi have received critical bug fixes.

VMware Server Is Cooked And Ready For Tasting

Filed under
Software

VMware has made its server product generally available from Wednesday. The product, previously the paid-for GSX Server, has been free to download in beta form for months but is now cooked according to VMware.

Lotus Haters Gang Up On Notes for Linux

Filed under
Software

After Lotus announced the release of the Lotus Notes 7.0.1 stand-alone client for Linux, IBM Lotus Chief Ed Brill conceded that the reaction was mixed... Which was a modest bit of understatement.

Real-life Gundam robot runs on Linux

Filed under
Linux

Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (ASIT) has just unleashed the latest in a long line of bipedal robots to come out of the R&D labs of this country.

Two Linux PCs Power 12-Station Internet Café

Filed under
Linux

HP, Blueloop and Omni partnered to deliver a 12-station Internet café running off two standard HP desktop computers at an international GroupWise conference held in Telford, UK.

Using DesktopBSD

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

Like PC-BSD, DesktopBSD provides many features that will allow a complete Unix novice to start using the operating system immediately. Those already familiar with FreeBSD and the KDE desktop will recognize the tools underlying the GUI conveniences.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS: Huawei and "GNU's Not Unix."

  • Huawei Could Rebuild Trust in Their Products Through Open Source

    Open source code for Huawei equipment would allow nations, companies, and individuals alike to verify that the code is free of malware, and that it contains no obvious security problems.

    Reproducible builds allow everyone to be reassured that the code running on the network devices matches the open source code that is reviewed by the public. This removes another layer of distrust.

    And if you want to protect against the advent of Chinese “malicious updates” you can use multi-party key signature schemes for firmware updates, to ensure that updates are approved by the government/company before they are rolled out.

  • The WIRED Guide to Open Source Software

    The open source software movement grew out of the related, but separate, "free software" movement. In 1983, Richard Stallman, at the time a programmer at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, said he would create a free alternative to the Unix operating system, then owned by AT&T; Stallman dubbed his alternative GNU, a recursive acronym for "GNU's Not Unix."

    For Stallman, the idea of "free" software was about more than giving software away. It was about ensuring that users were free to use software as they saw fit, free to study its source code, free to modify it for their own purposes, and free to share it with others. Stallman released his code under a license known as the GNU Public License, or GPL, which guarantees users those four software freedoms. The GPL is a "viral" license, meaning that anyone who creates software based on code licensed under the GPL must also release that derivative code under a GPL license.

GNOME 3.34 Desktop Environment Development Kicks Off with First Snapshot

GNOME 3.34 will be the next major release of the popular free and open-source desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems, expected to hit the streets later this year on September 11th. During its entire development cycle, GNOME 3.34 will be developed under the GNOME 3.33.x umbrella. Work on the GNOME 3.34 desktop environment begun a few weeks ago, after the launch of the GNOME 3.32 "Taipei" desktop environment, which is already the default desktop environment of the recently released Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo) operating system and other GNU/Linux distributions. Read more

The mysterious history of the MIT License

I say "seemingly straightforward" because the MIT License is one of the most popular licenses used by open source software. The MIT License, Apache License, and BSD license are the main permissive licenses, a term that contrasts with reciprocal licenses like the GPL, which require source code to be made available when software is redistributed. Given its popularity, you'd think the license's inception would be well-documented. I found various clues that added up to a date in the late 1980s but nothing definitive. However, Keith Packard and Jim Gettys jumped on the thread to offer first-hand accounts of the license's creation. In addition to providing early examples of the license, their help also gave me the context to better understand how the license evolved over time. Read more

BSD: A Look at NomadBSD and Audiocasts About BSDs and ZFS

  • NomadBSD, a BSD for the Road
    As regular It’s FOSS readers should know, I like diving into the world of BSDs. Recently, I came across an interesting BSD that is designed to live on a thumb drive. Let’s take a look at NomadBSD. [...] This German BSD comes with an OpenBox-based desktop with the Plank application dock. NomadBSD makes use of the DSB project. DSB stands for “Desktop Suite (for) (Free)BSD” and consists of a collection of programs designed to create a simple and working environment without needing a ton of dependencies to use one tool. DSB is created by Marcel Kaiser one of the lead devs of NomadBSD. Just like the original BSD projects, you can contact the NomadBSD developers via a mailing list.
  • Fun with funlinkat() | BSD Now 295
    Introducing funlinkat(), an OpenBSD Router with AT&T U-Verse, using NetBSD on a raspberry pi, ZFS encryption is still under development, Rump kernel servers and clients tutorial, Snort on OpenBSD 6.4, and more.
  • Snapshot Sanity | TechSNAP 402
    We continue our take on ZFS as Jim and Wes dive in to snapshots, replication, and the magic on copy on write. Plus some handy tools to manage your snapshots, rsync war stories, and more!