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Friday, 21 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Gas prices on verge of setting a record

Filed under
Misc

The average U.S. retail price for regular-grade gasoline rose 5.7 cents to $2.056 a gallon in the week ended today, less than a cent below the all-time record reached in May, the Energy Department said.

Gasoline prices across the U.S. have climbed since mid- February as refiners passed along higher costs for crude oil, which makes up about half the motor fuel's price. Oil futures in New York have climbed 26 percent this year to $54.95 a barrel today, the highest since October.

Nvidia core G80 emerges

Filed under
Hardware

NVIDIA'S NEXT generation graphic remains a well protected secret. We still managed to get some information about it, despite that. We confirmed that G70 is the real thing and we learned that Nvidia has one more chip down the road codenamed the G80.

MSN TV hacker jailed

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

A Louisiana man has been sent to prison for six months for sending a malicious e-mail to Microsoft MSN TV customers.

The e-mails the convicted man sent out contained an attachment that the mails claimed would re-set their TV’s display colours when opened. Instead, the attachment contained script that re-programmed customers’ TV boxes to dial 911 instead of a local phone number to access Microsoft’s servers.

'Best blogs on the web' honoured

Filed under
Web

The best of the web's blogs - online diaries or websites where people publish their thoughts - have been recognised in the annual Bloggies. The winners from 30 categories were announced at the SXSW Interactive Festival in Texas, US. Boing Boing won the coveted overall best blog prize.

Geekfathers: CyberCrime Mobs Revealed

Filed under
Legal

Crime is now organized on the Internet. Operating in the anonymity of cyberspace, Web mobs with names like Shadowcrew and stealthdivision are building networks that help crackers and phishers, money launderers and fences skim off some of the billions that travel through the Web every day.

Internet Access Tax May Not Be Dead

Filed under
Web

Thought you were free from paying new taxes on your Internet access, at least for the next four years? The Internet Tax Non-Discrimination Act was supposed to put a moratorium on new Net taxes. That, however, hasn't stopped some in Washington from suggesting that old taxes might be applied in new ways.

KDE 3.4 Out?

Filed under
News

Well, no, not officially, but distro developers are beginning to leak them. They appeared in this morning's gentoo portage (masked) and PLD mirrors.

Scheduled to be officially released Wednesday, March 16, the natives are getting restless. Myself? Definitely. I'm debating whether to start the download now or wait. I'm also debating whether to use ebuilds or tarballs. Decisions, decisions, decisions...

New game of tagging may be "it"

Filed under
Web

One of the more tantalizing, if not confounding, innovations in how people share information on the Web has to do with a new process called tagging.

Promulgated by a site called del.icio.us, tagging has to do with on-the-fly categorization of Web links. It's like a do-it-yourself Dewey Decimal System for the Web, except that it really isn't a system at all. At least, not yet.

Securing Slackware

Filed under
Linux
Using the exec-shield Kernel Patch on Slackware 10.1

by Kurt Fitzner

The Holy Grail of most any hacker trying to get access to a system is the remote buffer overflow attack. Well, actually, it's finding a Windows PC not protected by a firewall, but the remote buffer overflow attack is a (somewhat) close second. This article will discus one way to help protect against this type of attack on a Slackware Linux system with the installation of a special system called exec-shield.

Interview, interview, they've all got it in to view

Filed under
KDE

On LugRadio Jono Bacon, Stuart Langridge, Ade Bradshaw, and Matt Revell talk about Linux and whatever else comes along, including:

Aaron Seigo, KDE developer, talks about what KDE's up to and dispels some myths about the desktop environment.

Link.

10 Reasons to Switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

From the new "First and Only Magazine for the New Linux User" comes 10 Reasons to Switch to Linux.

  • It Doesn't Crash

  • Viruses Are Few and Far Between
  • Virtually Hardware-Independent
  • Freedom of Choice
  • Standards

Souped-up cellphones like tiny PCs

Filed under
Sci/Tech

A road warrior, Chad Stevens used to shuttle from airport to construction site to hotel, waiting until evening to catch up on the 200 e-mails accumulated each day on his laptop.

These days Stevens, who owns a travel-services business, leaves his laptop at home and uses his palmOne Treo to check e-mail, calendar appointments, driving directions and updates from his Web site — whether he's at a job site, at a stoplight or on his living-room couch.

Pimp my Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox straight 'out of the zip' is ok, but there's a lot you can change, modify and improve. From performance to looks to usability, Firefox tuning gives you the power to make a browser specific to your needs and taste.

CompUSA fingered by feds over rebates

Filed under
Legal

EVER WONDER about those Big Box rebate offers on computer kit being too good to be true? Still waiting for your rebate cheque to arrive? The US government is starting to move against companies that aren't paying up on time. On Friday, March 11, the United States Federal Trade Commission (here) settled charges against CompUSA and the offices of peripherals manufacturer QPS. Inc for "allegedly failing to pay, in a timely manner, thousands of rebates for products sold under the CompUSA and QPS brands."

Beer is fattening, say fat beer-swilling readers

Filed under
Misc

In reference to the article claiming beer isn't fattening, theregister received many letters disputing the findings. We laughed, we cried, ...it contains something for everyone. Link.

US DHS buys more name analysis tools

Filed under
Security

The Homeland Security Department's Customs and Border Protection agency, an arm of the Border and Transportation Security Directorate, has signed a sole-source contract with Language Analysis Systems Inc. of Herndon, Va., for additional software to help analyze names of people.

The software is particularly useful in winnowing the names of terrorists out of lists of passengers or other data sources.

Bringing $100 laptops to developing world

Filed under
Hardware

In rural Cambodian villages with no electricity, nighttime darkness is pierced by the glow from laptop computers that children bring home from school.

The kids belong to three schools that Nicholas Negroponte of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has equipped with inexpensive notebook computers.

"When the kids bring them home and open them up, it's the brightest light source in the home."

MADSHRIMPS Piotke's CeBIT Review

Filed under
Hardware
Humor

lol Piotke's review of Cebit is a little different than most all the others', in that his is a visual tour consisting solely of pictures. Not the same boring ole hardware for Piotke, no. He had a better time than most I would say!

Another One for Our Side

Filed under
Linux

Ardan Peddell, director of The Emerald Hill Group, which manages pubs in a trendy part of Singapore, had long been enticed by Linux's appeal. But he only started implementing the technology about three months ago-when a Linux expert came knocking at his door for a job. That hastened Emerald's adoption of Linux.

Microsoft's PUMA to prevent theft of audio data

Filed under
Microsoft

At the end of April at the WinHEC 2005 developers´ conference Microsoft intends to furnish further details on the copy protection functions of the successor to Windows XP Longhorn, which is planned for 2006.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Mirai and Singapore's Massive Breach

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Mirai botnet hackers [sic] avoid jail time by helping FBI

    The three men, Josiah White, 21, Dalton Norman, 22, and Paras Jha, 22, all from the US, managed to avoid the clink by providing "substantial assistance in other complex cybercrime investigations", according to the US Department of Justice. Who'd have thought young hacker [sic] types would roll over and show their bellies when faced with prison time....

  • A healthcare IT foundation built on gooey clay
    Today, there was a report from the Solicitor General of Singapore about the data breach of the SingHealth systems that happened in July. These systems have been in place for many years. They are almost exclusively running Microsoft Windows along with a mix of other proprietary software including Citrix and Allscript. The article referred to above failed to highlight that the compromised “end-user workstation” was a Windows machine. That is the very crucial information that always gets left out in all of these reports of breaches. I have had the privilege of being part of an IT advisory committee for a local hospital since about 2004 (that committee has disbanded a couple of years ago, btw). [...] Part of the reason is because decision makers (then and now) only have experience in dealing with proprietary vendor solutions. Some of it might be the only ones available and the open source world has not created equivalent or better offerings. But where there are possibly good enough or even superior open source offerings, they would never be considered – “Rather go with the devil I know, than the devil I don’t know. After all, this is only a job. When I leave, it is someone else’s problem.” (Yeah, I am paraphrasing many conversations and not only from the healthcare sector). I recall a project that I was involved with – before being a Red Hatter – to create a solution to create a “computer on wheels” solution to help with blood collection. As part of that solution, there was a need to check the particulars of the patient who the nurse was taking samples from. That patient info was stored on some admission system that did not provide a means for remote, API-based query. The vendor of that system wanted tens of thousands of dollars to just allow the query to happen. Daylight robbery. I worked around it – did screen scrapping to extract the relevant information. Healthcare IT providers look at healthcare systems as a cashcow and want to milk it to the fullest extent possible (the end consumer bears the cost in the end). Add that to the dearth of technical IT skills supporting the healthcare providers, you quickly fall into that vendor lock-in scenario where the healthcare systems are at the total mercy of the proprietary vendors.

Recoll – A Full-Text GUI Search Tool for Linux Systems

We wrote on various search tools recently like in 9 Productivity Tools for Linux That Are Worth Your Attention and FSearch, and readers suggested awesome alternatives. Today, we bring you an app that can find text anywhere in your computer in grand style – Recoll. Recoll is an open-source GUI search utility app with an outstanding full-text search capability. You can use it to search for keywords and file names on Linux distros and Windows. It supports most of the document formats and plugins for text extraction. Read more

today's howtos

Linux Foundation for Sale

  • Open Source Summit EU Registration Deadline, Sept. 22, Register Now to Save $150 [Ed: Microsoft is the "DIAMOND" sponsor of this event, the highest sponsorship level! Linux Foundation, or the Zemlin PAC, seems to be more about Microsoft than about Linux.]
  • Building a Secure Ecosystem for Node.js [Ed: Earlier today the Zemlin PAC did this puff piece for Microsoft (a sponsor)]
  • The Human Side of Digital Transformation: 7 Recommendations and 3 Pitfalls [Ed: New Zemlin PAC-sponsored and self-serving puff piece]
    Not so long ago, business leaders repeatedly asked: “What exactly is digital transformation and what will it do for my business?” Today we’re more likely to hear, “How do we chart a course?” Our answer: the path to digital involves more than selecting a cloud application platform. Instead, digital, at its heart, is a human journey. It’s about cultivating a mindset, processes, organization and culture that encourages constant innovation to meet ever-changing customer expectations and business goals. In this two-part blog series we’ll share seven guidelines for getting digital right. Read on for the first three.