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Tuesday, 11 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Is Amazon creating an Android game console? Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2014 - 7:20am
Story Use the Raspberry Pi as a DIY Surveillance camera Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2014 - 7:11am
Story Every company bring its own agenda to open source Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2014 - 1:44am
Story A Collection of Secret Linux Humor Rianne Schestowitz 22/01/2014 - 1:20am
Story Valve’s OpenGL debugger is being developed on Kubuntu along with Ubuntu & Linux MInt Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2014 - 9:22pm
Story Meizu Russia confirms “Ubuntu rumors” Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2014 - 9:20pm
Story Linux Kernel Updates Add Features for Mobile, Cloud, Big Data Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2014 - 9:11pm
Story Linux: the future of gaming Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2014 - 9:07pm
Story PiPad: The Raspberry Pi tablet Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2014 - 9:01pm
Story Can Android Challenge Embedded Linux? Roy Schestowitz 21/01/2014 - 8:55pm

Top Distros of 2005

Filed under
Linux
-s

2005 has been an exciting year on the Linux distribution front. For some of us, every year is an exciting year in Linux, but 2005 was undoubtedly a banner year for open source and Linux to be sure. We've seen a lot of technological progress as well as some philosophical, personnel, and directional changes. I think it's only fitting to look at some of Tuxmachines' Top Distro Picks of 2005.

Nessus 3.0: The End of the Age of Open-Source Innocence?

Filed under
OSS

The recent licensing changes affect a broad spectrum of users, including corporations, the open-source community, and even businesses using services that use Nessus. So what exactly does this mean for open source? Is it the end of the age of innocence? What options do interested parties have going forward?

Linux Dies Under Microsoft's Open Document standard

Filed under
Linux

None of us should focus on open XML wrappers for document formats. Instead, we should be concerned with what goes inside of those wrappers, because if Microsoft is allowed to go forward with its standard, they win and the world loses.

EU Threatens Microsoft With $2.4 Million Daily Fine

Filed under
Microsoft

The European Union threatened to fine Microsoft Corp., the world's largest software maker, as much as 2 million euros ($2.4 million) a day for failing to comply with a 2004 antitrust order. Microsoft called the statement ``unjustified.'

Using a liveCD as your Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Many liveCD distros can be used as a day to day desktop without ever installing them to your hard drive. Huh? Wait a minute, everyone installs the OS to a hard disk! Well yes, that's the way it has always been done, but I am not sure why we should continue in that direction... "ah, but I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now."

SCO's Unix slide continues in Q4

Filed under
Misc

In the fourth quarter, SCO pulled in $8.5m, which is a sharp drop from the $10.1m in revenue reported in the same quarter last year. "This decrease in revenue was primarily due to a decrease in Unix revenue as a result of continued competitive pressure on the company's Unix products and services," SCO said.

Recovering deleted /etc/shadow password file

Filed under
HowTos

Even if you boot in single user mode it will ask root password for maintenance, and just imagine you do not have a backup of /etc/shadow file. How will you fix such problem in a production environment where time is critical factor? Relax here I will explain how to recover deleted /etc/shadow file in five easy steps. It will take around 10 min. to fix problem.

UPDATE - The top 10 stories of 2005

Midway through the decade, new pricing and business models championed by relative upstarts such as Google Inc. and Salesforce.com Inc. are forcing established players to reinvent themselves. Meanwhile, old-line companies that have failed to meet the challenges of the new millennium are cleaning house, sometimes starting with the chief executive. Here, not necessarily in order of importance, are the IDG News Service's pick of the top stories of the year.

XGL - Realistically

Filed under
Software

Yes it would be nice if X.org could use OpenGL directly for it's display and composition, but to date, nobody has made this possible. Is it wrong for a business to make it so? Since when does developing software for GNU products mean that they aren't allowed to do it privately? If Novell is developing XGL behind closed doors, and paying the developers to build it... Where's the problem?

Ping: ICMP vs. ARP

Filed under
HowTos

Network and system administrators are well-versed in using the ping utility for troubleshooting purposes, but where do you turn when ping doesn't do the trick?

X11R6.9 and X11R7.0 Officially Released

Filed under
Software

The first major version release of the X Window System in more than a decade, X11R7.0 is the first release of the complete modularized and autotooled source code base for the X Window System. X11R6.9, its companion release, contains identical features, and uses the exact same source code as X11R7.0, but with the traditional imake build system.

A sneaky Linux present for a Windows-using friend

Filed under
Linux

Want a really, really sneaky way to get your Windows loyalist friends to give Linux a try? Boy, does Chris Ward, an IBM software engineer, have an idea for you!

MAKING YOUR KDE LOOK LIKE A MAC OS X

Filed under
HowTos

Many people are interested in getting their linux or BSD desktop interface to look as much like Apple's very successful OS X gui as possible. Here is a step by step method for doing so on the KDE desktop environment.

Why Samba is one of my favorite Linux apps

Filed under
Software

One of my favorite open-source applications is Samba. For me, it, and not Apache, is the Linux "killer" server app that I use all the time.

Multi-Booting the Solaris 10 OS, Linux, and Microsoft Windows on a Laptop

Filed under
HowTos

As an intern working for Sun Microsystems, one of my first projects was to configure my laptop to multi-boot the Solaris Operating System, Linux, and Microsoft Windows. It sounded very exciting but daunting. However, as I went along, it proved to be a fairly easy exercise. These are the steps it takes to configure a system for multi-boot:

A Firefox for music?

Filed under
Moz/FF

Lord's new five-person company, the ambitiously named Pioneers of the Inevitable, is building a piece of digital-music software called "Songbird," based on much of the same underlying open-source technology as the Firefox Web browser.

Sun: No Rush to Open Software

Filed under
OSS

Those who hope Sun Microsystems Inc. will open-source all of its software products anytime soon are in for a big disappointment.

Miro Transfers all Rights to Mambo Open Source CMS

Filed under
Software

Today, Peter Lamont, CEO of Miro, signed a legal deed granting to the Mambo Foundation the rights and interests in the Mambo name, logo, and associated trademarks.

Linux Distributor Mandriva Adds Internet Telephony

Filed under
MDV
Sci/Tech

Linux distributor Mandriva on Wednesday said it has integrated Internet telephony software from Skype into the open-source operating system.

Lightweight podcatching client targets Linux users

Filed under
Software

There's a new, minimalistic -- and reportedly fast -- podcatching client for Linux now available for free download. BashPodder is a podcatching client written in bash code that requires the bash shell, wget, and sed -- all three of which are typically installed on any Linux system.

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More in Tux Machines

Devices: Raspberry Pi, Winmate (With Intel ME Back Doors), and Purism

  • Raspberry Pi projects for IT professionals

    The single-board design is affordable and has been used to promote computer science in schools. Despite this and a strong consumer base, the applications for Raspberry Pi have become more advanced over the years beyond just education and is being used in industry too.

    There are various ways the Raspberry Pi can be embedded to create huge value in the enterprise world. Such projects developed using Raspberry Pi may transform traditional businesses.

    Here are some ways to use Raspberry Pi effectively in your business.

  • Apollo Lake mini-PC offers WiFi and a USB Type-C port with DP
    Winmate’s rugged, Linux-friendly “EAC Mini EACIL22S” mini-PC runs on an Intel Apollo Lake processor and offers 64GB eMMC, WiFi, a DisplayPort-ready USB Type-C port, and dual GbE and USB 2.0 ports, Winmate has begun adding some Linux-supported systems to its largely Windows-driven embedded lineup, including the recent FM10A VMC touch-panel computer for forklifts. Now, it has launched a rugged, Apollo Lake based mini-PC with Ubuntu 16.04, Linux 4.1.5, or Win 10 IoT Enterprise. The 115 x 90 x 31mm, 0.8 Kilogram EAC Mini EACIL22S follows a similar, but NXP i.MX6 based, EAC Mini EACFA20 system that runs Android 6.0.
  • Break Free from Privacy Prison with Purism
    As 2018 comes to a close, people around the world have to face the stark truth of surveillance capitalism. Nearly all consumer products — speakers, phones, cars, and perhaps even mattresses — are recording devices, storing metrics on our movements and behavior. The New York Times just published a detailed report on location tracking in leaky Android and iOS apps. That’s just a fact of life when people use smartphones, right? Wrong. In 2019, Purism’s Librem 5 smartphone will be proof that no one has to live with spies in their pockets. If anything has changed since Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica scandal, it’s that more and more people are jumping ship from the Frightful Five: Google, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, and Microsoft. At Purism, we offer an alternative to the polluted software ecosystems of these tech giants. Our code is Free and Open-Source Software (FOSS), the industry standard in security because it can be verified by experts and amateurs alike. The software on our Librem laptops and our upcoming phone stands on a strong, foundational chain of trust that is matched by hardware features such as kill switches. These switches give people the added assurance that their devices won’t record or “phone home” to advertisers, spies, and cyber criminals. Turn off WiFi, microphone, and webcam on the Librem 5 and they’re off, no question about it.

Graphics: V3D, AMD/Vega, Flicker-Free Boot

  • V3D Compute, VC4 display, PM
    For V3D last week, I resurrected my old GLES 3.1 series with SSBO and shader imgae support, rebuilt it for V3D 4.1 (shader images no longer need manual tiling), and wrote indirect draw support and started on compute shaders. As of this weekend, dEQP-GLES31 is passing 1387/1567 of tests with “compute” in the name on the simulator. I have a fix needed for barrier(), then it’s time to build the kernel interface. In the process, I ended up fixing several job flushing bugs, plugging memory leaks, improving our shader disassembly debug dumps, and reducing memory consumption and CPU overhead.
  • AMD Outs New Vega 10 & 20 IDs With Linux Driver Patch
    AMD may have accidentally revealed some new products containing its Radeon RX Vega 10 and Radeon RX Vega 20 graphics technologies. The company patched its RadeonSI Mesa and AMDKFD/AMDGPU kernel drivers with new PCI IDs; no other changes were made with the patch. Phoronix reported that the patch added six new IDs released to Vega 10: 0x6869, 0x686A, 0x686B, 0x686D, 0x686E, and 0x686F. These are new IDs that were previously only referenced in an update to macOS Mojave and GPUOpen's lists of GFX9 parts. That could mean AMD plans to introduce new Vega 10 products sooner than later, but the company might also be internally testing new products that are a ways from release.
  • AMD Files Trademark For Vega II
    It looks like AMD could be announcing Vega II as new 7nm Vega GPUs soon complementing the recently announced Vega 20 Radeon Instinct MI50 / MI60 accelerators.
  • Arch Linux Users With Intel Graphics Can Begin Enjoying A Flicker-Free Boot
    It looks like the recent efforts led by Red Hat / Fedora on providing a flicker-free Linux boot experience and thanks to their upstream-focused approach is starting to pay off for the other desktop Linux distributions... A flicker-free boot experience can now be achieved on Arch Linux with the latest packages, assuming you don't have any quirky hardware.  A Phoronix reader reported in earlier today that Arch Linux as of the 4.19.8-arch1-1-ARCH kernel is working out well for the seamless/flicker-free boot experience. The caveat though -- like with Fedora -- is that it only works with Intel graphics hardware/driver for now and does require setting the "i915.fastboot=1" kernel module parameter.

today's howtos

Android Leftovers