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Thursday, 21 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Rianne Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 7:05pm
Story PostGres-XL released to tackle big data analytics and more Rianne Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 6:04pm
Story Meet errors.ubuntu.com, a Poweful Bug Tracker from Canonical Rianne Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 2:56pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 2:07pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 2:05pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 2:04pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 2:04pm
Story Chinese Government Says on TV That Windows XP Users Should Choose Linux Rianne Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 1:51pm
Story Canonical Announces The Orange Box $12k USD Ubuntu Cluster Suitcase Rianne Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 1:48pm
Story Ouya Portable Developed? Modder Creates Mobile 720p Version Of Open Source Console Roy Schestowitz 13/05/2014 - 1:43pm

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ISO approval 'unlikely for Microsoft Open XML'

Filed under
Microsoft

The International Organisation for Standardisation is unlikely to adopt Microsoft Office Open XML format, now that it has approved the OpenDocument Format, according to analyst group Gartner.

How Trustworthy Is Your OS?

Filed under
OS
Reviews

Trusted operating systems have been used for some time to lock down the most sensitive of information in the most sensitive of organizations. Several vendors, including Red Hat, Sun Microsystems and Novell, are responding by adding and/or improving trusted elements in their operating system offerings. eWEEK Labs has put the application lockdown options from Sun, Red Hat and Novell through their paces.

Anti-Virii for Linux: Panda's and Avira's

Filed under
Software
Reviews

Linux-only workstations are far more secure than Windows PCs when comes to trojan and viruses coming by e-mail. Therefore, many Linux users either don't feel the need to use an antivirus under Linux. The last weekend I decided to try both Linux Desktop Anti-Virii.

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Discontinued SUSE Linux Distribution: 9.1

Filed under
SUSE

SUSE Security has announced that SUSE Linux 9.1 (Personal and Professional edition) will be discontinued soon. Having provided security-relevant fixes for more than two years, vulnerabilities found in SUSE Linux 9.1 after June 15, 2006 will not be fixed.

Penguin Power on PS3? Probably.

Filed under
Gaming

Ever since the announcement of the PlayStation 3's November release date, the Internet has been abuzz with discussion over the promise of Ken Kutaragi's brief mention of Linux.

KDE Desktop Hosting Service

Filed under
KDE

InQub Ltd offers personal remote KDE desktops on Kubuntu using NoMachine's NX technology for bandwidth savings and connection encryption for a small monthly charge.

Beta Testing 101

Filed under
Howtos

Ever have one of those days when you can't stand end users? I know I have.

There are several expectations end users have for people creating software, or even Linux distros. They want it to work on their hardware, they want it to be stable, and they want it right now. But, at the same time, new releases shouldn't come too often, or it messes up the feng shui of their systems.

SUSE 10.1 DVD ISOs Available

Filed under
SUSE

SUSE Linux 10.1 DVD ISOs are now available for download, as well as LiveDVD version. At this moment it can be downloaded via torrents only. openSUSE.org website still states 18th of May as the date of availability of downloadable DVD version, so expect FTP servers to open around in next 24-48 hours.

Ethernet Bridges under Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Bridging is the process of transparently connecting two networks segments together, so that packets can pass between the two as if they were a single logical network. Bridging is performed on the data link layer; hence it is independent of the network protocol being used - it doesn't matter if you use IP, Appletalk, Netware or any other protocol, as the bridge operates upon the raw ethernet packets.

Open source grows big and strong

Filed under
OSS

Red Hat belongs to a first-generation open source development model and has refined this with nww product functionality delivered through Fedora Linux. JBoss, on the other hand, employs the lead developers in the open source projects at the base of its JBoss Enterprise Middleware System platform, and describes its approach as a second-generation open source business model. The combined entity provides a subscription model for first-class infrastructure software that also happens to be open source – whether that is a coincidence or not makes for an interesting debate.

Selinux on FC5

Filed under
Linux

Selinux can be confusing, but it's ordinary and default configuration is actually pretty simple. We'll examine it on Fedora Core 5.

Extending Nautilus with Scripts and Extensions

Filed under
HowTos

Nautilus, the GNOME file manager, has a host of functionality for browsing and managing file systems, and for accessing remote servers including Windows shares, FTP servers, SSH servers, and WebDAV servers. On top of its built-in capabilities, you can extend the functionality of Nautilus by using Nautilus Scripts and Extensions. It's not too hard to do, and I'll show you how to get started.

Sun Releases Java EE 5, More Open Source Projects

Filed under
OSS

Sun Microsystems kicked off its annual JavaOne conference with a trio of announcements concerning code availability: it's offering two new open source efforts and has officially released Java Platform 5, Enterprise Edition.

My desktop OS: Arch Linux

Filed under
Linux

I've been a Linux diehard since my early days with Debian 1.3. I visited various RPM distributions, including Red Hat, Mandrake, and SUSE, flirted with Gentoo, and jumped on the Ubuntu bandwagon, but I could never find a single place to settle -- until I tried Arch Linux.

Bridging the gap between Office and OpenOffice

Filed under
OOo

OpenOffice 2.0 -- the free, open source office suite -- has many features that are very similar to Microsoft Office. The trick is knowing how to use them. In this Q&A, expert Solveig Haugland explains how to use such OpenOffice features as the Draw tool, tabbed headers and footers.

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Server: HTTP Clients, IIS DDoS and 'DevOps' Hype From Red Hat

  • What are good command line HTTP clients?
    The whole is greater than the sum of its parts is a very famous quote from Aristotle, a Greek philosopher and scientist. This quote is particularly pertinent to Linux. In my view, one of Linux’s biggest strengths is its synergy. The usefulness of Linux doesn’t derive only from the huge raft of open source (command line) utilities. Instead, it’s the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with larger applications. The Unix philosophy spawned a “software tools” movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects. Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well independently. This article looks at 4 open source command line HTTP clients. These clients let you download files over the internet from the command line. But they can also be used for many more interesting purposes such as testing, debugging and interacting with HTTP servers and web applications. Working with HTTP from the command-line is a worthwhile skill for HTTP architects and API designers. If you need to play around with an API, HTTPie and curl will be invaluable.
  • Microsoft publishes security alert on IIS bug that causes 100% CPU usage spikes
    The Microsoft Security Response Center published yesterday a security advisory about a denial of service (DOS) issue impacting IIS (Internet Information Services), Microsoft's web server technology.
  • 5 things to master to be a DevOps engineer
    There's an increasing global demand for DevOps professionals, IT pros who are skilled in software development and operations. In fact, the Linux Foundation's Open Source Jobs Report ranked DevOps as the most in-demand skill, and DevOps career opportunities are thriving worldwide. The main focus of DevOps is bridging the gap between development and operations teams by reducing painful handoffs and increasing collaboration. This is not accomplished by making developers work on operations tasks nor by making system administrators work on development tasks. Instead, both of these roles are replaced by a single role, DevOps, that works on tasks within a cooperative team. As Dave Zwieback wrote in DevOps Hiring, "organizations that have embraced DevOps need people who would naturally resist organization silos."

Purism's Privacy and Security-Focused Librem 5 Linux Phone to Arrive in Q3 2019

Initially planned to ship in early 2019, the revolutionary Librem 5 mobile phone was delayed for April 2019, but now it suffered just one more delay due to the CPU choices the development team had to make to deliver a stable and reliable device that won't heat up or discharge too quickly. Purism had to choose between the i.MX8M Quad or the i.MX8M Mini processors for their Librem 5 Linux-powered smartphone, but after many trials and errors they decided to go with the i.MX8M Quad CPU as manufacturer NXP recently released a new software stack solving all previous power consumption and heating issues. Read more

Qt Creator 4.9 Beta released

We are happy to announce the release of Qt Creator 4.9 Beta! There are many improvements and fixes included in Qt Creator 4.9. I’ll just mention some highlights in this blog post. Please refer to our change log for a more thorough overview. Read more

Hack Week - Browsersync integration for Online

Recently my LibreOffice work is mostly focused on the Online. It's nice to see how it is growing with new features and has better UI. But when I was working on improving toolbars (eg. folding menubar or reorganization of items) I noticed one annoying thing from the developer perspective. After every small change, I had to restart the server to provide updated content for the browser. It takes few seconds for switching windows, killing old server then running new one which requires some tests to be passed. Last week during the Hack Week funded by Collabora Productivity I was able to work on my own projects. It was a good opportunity for me to try to improve the process mentioned above. I've heard previously about browsersync so I decided to try it out. It is a tool which can automatically reload used .css and .js files in all browser sessions after change detection. To make it work browsersync can start proxy server watching files on the original server and sending events to the browser clients if needed. Read more