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Wednesday, 20 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android L unofficial ROM available for Nexus 4 Roy Schestowitz 07/07/2014 - 8:09am
Story Linux Kernel 3.4.97 Arrives with Updated Drivers and PowerPC Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 07/07/2014 - 8:08am
Story Operating System U Now Solicits Community Ideas Rianne Schestowitz 07/07/2014 - 8:00am
Story Best Custom Icon Packs for Android Rianne Schestowitz 07/07/2014 - 7:56am
Story SystemRescueCd 4.3.0 Officially Released with GParted 0.19.0 Rianne Schestowitz 07/07/2014 - 7:46am
Story New Linux Kernel Vulnerability Patched in Three LTS Ubuntu Distros Rianne Schestowitz 07/07/2014 - 7:35am
Story Plasma Next Accessibility Rianne Schestowitz 06/07/2014 - 11:07pm
Story Linux 3.16-rc4 Kernel Brings More Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 06/07/2014 - 9:27pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Rianne Schestowitz 06/07/2014 - 9:16pm
Story Leftovers: Software Rianne Schestowitz 06/07/2014 - 9:15pm

Virtual Linux Could Be Answer To Costly Data Centers

Filed under
Linux

Guru Vasudeva, enterprise chief architect at Nationwide Mutual Insurance, said during one presentation that his company plans to consolidate 600 Linux servers as virtual machines on two IBM mainframes by year's end.

Akademy 2006 Sponsors

Filed under
KDE

Akademy 2006 has announced the sponsor's list for KDE's World Summit. This is one of the our most impressive list of sponsors to date. Our Gold sponsors are the home of Linus Torvalds OSDL and the KDE based distribution Kubuntu.

An Interview with Mindware Studios

Filed under
Interviews
Gaming

With Cold War (Mindware Studio's inaugural title) having gone gold late last month for Linux, we took the time to get a few questions answered by Mindware Studios. In this interview, Patrik Rak of Mindware answered some of our questions about their Meng engine as well as a few pieces of information from what we can expect to see in the future including some more information on their Linux and Macintosh clients.

VMware Faces Competition For Virtualisation Market

Filed under
Software

"VMWare has done a great job of educating the market", says XenSource as it goes after what CEO, it claims is the 96% of that market not currently served by the competition. But VMware could still benefit from in-fighting.

Linux installations equals profit: study

Filed under
Linux

The results of a poll entitled "Linux in the Channel" suggests resellers with an established practice around Linux-based solutions are experiencing sustainable and profitable revenues.

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Gizmo On SUSE - Coolest SIP Compliant VoIP Client

Filed under
HowTos

I have been using Skype for some time now, and the only grudge I have is that the Linux version of Skype is not keeping up with the latest release for Windows platform. So I decided to look elsewhere, and an application that complies with SIP. The answer for me lies with Gizmo Project.

Upgrading Wi-Fi: What, When, and Why

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Wi-Fi (802.11x) networks have been around long enough that many businesses and home users run their own. The first widely deployed standard was 802.11b, while most new hardware uses 802.11g. The latest 802.11n hardware is just around the corner. If you run an existing wireless network, is it time to upgrade?

And the apathetic shall inherit the earth...

Filed under
Linux

Last week I wrote about using GNU/Linux, and justified why I use it. America might be the land of the brave, down here we're the land of the apathetic... Does in really matter how and under what circumstances I became involved as long as I'm here now? Does it matter if I'm using it because it's cheap, or because it's better, or because I like the politics? What if I don't give two hoots about the politics? Is there a good way and a bad way to use FLOSS?

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Can Novell's horse win the derby?

Filed under
SUSE

Orem itself has three notable features: a steakhouse that serves the largest portions of food known to man; a university that churns out graduates to work at Novell; and Novell itself. Since the purchase, Suse has failed to impress on Novell's bottom line. And then came Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop and Server 10.

Defense Dept. Report Urges Adoption of Open Technology

"The whole concept is really a development methodology," said Paul Smith, vice president of government sales operations at Red Hat. "What the Dept. of Defense is trying to accomplish is a change in their governance model. [It's] a move from their old way of stovepipe development to a more open source model."

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New York School Districts Select Linux Desktops

Filed under
SUSE

Students in upstate New York have moved one step closer to having a computer at every desk thanks to a pilot program using Linux desktops from Novell on Intel-based computers.

Mere Users Could Leap Into Tinkerers' World

Filed under
Linux

The Linux operating system -- a free, open-source alternative to Windows and Mac OS X -- has long served to define the gap between people who merely use computers and those who tinker with them.

Signs

Filed under
Linux

Standing at the counter of a local electrical retailer I noticed some mp3 players hanging on a rack. The fine print said "Compatible with Windows, Mac, Linux".

CentOS and Redhat, Best for the Server

Filed under
Reviews

Short review of CentOS and Red Hat and how Ubuntu is not gonna push anyone out of the server and enterprise market especially these two.

EC votes for Open Source

Filed under
OSS

With Stallman, a passionate evangelist of the Open Source software movement, in India on a proselytising mission, the Election Commission has decided to uninstall Microsoft Office applications from its entire workspace and replace them with the free OpenOffice.

Linux: Kernel 2.4.33.1 Released

Filed under
Linux

Willy Tarreau, the new maintainer of the Linux 2.4 kernel, released the 2.4.33.1 kernel. This is a security fix release for the 2.4.33 kernel and the first time a 2.4-series kernel is being released with 4 version fields.

Why was Linux successful (and will it stay so)?

Filed under
Linux

Internet News reported on a panel discussion of the reasons why Linux was successful. The impression that Linux was more receptive to new ideas and less demanding about their implementation is alluded to: It has also given the illusion of a kernel and OS more open to the individual developer.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ First Impressions

I have always been curious about the tiny computer called Raspberry Pi but I didn’t have the time or opportunity to buy one until now. I got the latest version (Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+) along with bundled accessories from AliExpress for $65. I think it was a good deal considering what I got which I will explain to you later on. But before that and for your convenience, here are some quick facts about Raspberry Pi that I got from Wikipedia... Read more

GNOME Desktop: Parental Controls and More

  • Parental controls & metered data hackfest: days 1 & 2
    I’m currently at the Parental Controls & Metered Data hackfest at Red Hat’s office in London. A bunch of GNOME people from various companies (Canonical, Endless, elementary, and Red Hat) have gathered to work out a plan to start implementing these two features in GNOME. The first two days have been dedicated to the parental control features. This is the ability for parents to control what children can do on the computer. For example, locking down access to certain applications or websites. Day one began with presentations of the Endless OS implementation by Philip, followed by a demonstration of the Elementary version by Cassidy. Elementary were interested in potentially expanding this feature set to include something like Digital Wellbeing – we explored the distinction between this and parental controls. It turns out that these features are relatively similar – the main differences are whether you are applying restrictions to yourself or to someone else, and whether you have the ability to lift/ignore the restrictions. We’ve started talking about the latter of these as “speed bumps”: you can always undo your own restrictions, so the interventions from the OS should be intended to nudge you towards the right behaviour. After that we looked at some prior art (Android, iOS), and started to take the large list of potential features (in the image above) down to the ones we thought might be feasible to implement. Throughout all of this, one topic we kept coming back to was app lockdown. It’s reasonably simple to see how this could be applied to containerised apps (e.g. Snap or Flatpak), but system applications that come from a deb or an rpm are much more difficult. It would probably be possible – but still difficult – to use an LSM like AppArmor or SELinux to do this by denying execute access to the application’s binary. One obvious problem with that is that GNOME doesn’t require one of these and different distributions have made different choices here… Another tricky topic is how to implement website white/blacklisting in a robust way. We discussed using DNS (systemd-resolved?) and ip/nftables implementations, but it might turn out that the most feasible way is to use a browser extension for this.
  • GNOME ED Update – February
    Another update is now due from what we’ve been doing at the Foundation, and we’ve been busy! As you may have seen, we’ve hired three excellent people over the past couple of months. Kristi Progri has joined us as Program Coordinator, Bartłomiej Piorski as a devops sysadmin, and Emmanuele Bassi as our GTK Core developer. I hope to announce another new hire soon, so watch this space… There’s been quite a lot of discussion around the Google API access, and GNOME Online Accounts. The latest update is that I submitted the application to Google to get GOA verified, and we’ve got a couple of things we’re working through to get this sorted.

Android Leftovers