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Friday, 17 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Apple & Intel: What you need to know

Filed under
Mac

Apple’s startling announcement that it will begin a transition away from PowerPC chips to Intel-made processors has left Mac fans’ heads spinning, and not just because a former “enemy” of the Mac is now counted among its allies. What do you need to know?

Sneak Peek at PCLOS pre-9

Filed under
PCLOS
-s

Pre9 is expected out any day now and Tuxmachines was privy to an exclusive sneak peak at what's new and exciting. Most obvious to the nekked eye is more eye candy. A distro known far and wide for its beauty, PCLOS has topped itself once again.

IBM to Reveal Details of New Cell Chips

Filed under
Hardware

IBM Corp. planned to reveal key details of its highly anticipated "Cell" microprocessors Wednesday as part of the company's effort to support open-source computing designs.

Military 'hacker' Arrested

Filed under
Legal

Police in London arrested an unemployed computer systems administrator on Tuesday, over two years after U.S. authorities said they would request his extradition to answer charges of hacking U.S. government computer systems.

Advent Falls Down, Can't Get Up

Filed under
Gaming

Over the past few years, some video games have made great strides blending cinematic narrative with engaging action. Unfortunately, for all its bluster, the science fiction adventure Advent Rising is not one of them.

Chinese gamer sentenced to life

Filed under
Legal

A Shanghai online gamer has been given a suspended death sentence for killing a fellow gamer when he sold a borrowed sword on ebay for peanuts.

M$ targets Apache Web server

Filed under
Microsoft

Tired of playing second fiddle in Web hosting, Microsoft is revamping its server software in an attempt to snatch market share away from the popular Apache-Linux combination.

Apple's Intel switch doesn't spell security doom

Filed under
Mac

Apple's switch to Intel chips does not spell the start of Windows PC-style security problems for Macs, experts say.

M$ fined $9 million for patent infringement

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft has been ordered to pay $9 million for infringing a spreedsheet patent with Excel. The jury in a Californian court awarded $8.96 million to Guatemalan inventor Carlos Amado who had sued the software giant for infringing his patent.

Devil's Advocate: M$ foolish patent policy

Filed under
Microsoft

Company out to patent innovations that precede its existence... If large companies are to be granted patents on ideas that have been commonplace for years and are based on fundamental concepts well understood for decades, they might as well be given taxation powers. The idea that their revenues are hard won in competitive markets will be defunct, if it is not already.

Genes blamed for fickle female orgasm

Filed under
Misc

Is this the ultimate excuse for poor performance in bed? "Sorry, darling," the man says, just before falling asleep. "It's your genes.

Seattle Is 'Most Unwired City' In America

Filed under
Sci/Tech

"Wireless is becoming a fundamental part of how we live," said Bert Sperling of Sperling's Best Places, which conducted the surveys. "The ability to access information and entertainment when and where you want it is simply irresistible to business people seeking greater productivity and consumers who live an on-the-go lifestyle." Seattle narrowly unseated former top position holders San Francisco and Portland , Ore.

AMD SLI vs Intel SLI

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

This year has seen the arrival of many new interesting technologies such as PCI Express and DDR2. Yet to this day SLI still remains by far the most hyped about technology. SLI was designed by NVIDIA and allows two select graphics cards to work together. The results have been good, leaving us to wonder who really does offer the best SLI performance, AMD or Intel.

Apple opens up open-source effort

Filed under
KDE
Mac

Apple Computer has expanded its open-source operations, cheering volunteer Web browser coders who had raised complaints against the computer maker.

What does Apple’s move mean for Linux?

Filed under
Linux
Mac

Now that the rumors have turned out to be true, what is this going to mean for Linux — if anything?

Got computer rage? safe ways to vent

Filed under
Misc

Kent Norman did something most people would like to do with their workplace irritations. After work one day, he torched the source of his angst: a computer mouse.

Citigroup Says UPS Lost Data

Filed under
Security

Citigroup, the world's largest bank, on Monday said account and payment history data on 3.9 million of its customers were lost in transit by United Parcel Service.

Spoofing flaw resurfaces in Mozilla browsers

Filed under
Security

A 7-year-old flaw that could let an attacker place malicious content on trusted Web sites has resurfaced in the most recent Firefox browser, Secunia has warned.

United Airlines Cleared for Wi-Fi Onboard

Filed under
Sci/Tech

United Airlines, the world's second-largest carrier, received regulatory approval Monday to install wireless Internet access to its fleet in a partnership with Verizon Communications Inc.

Apple's Deal With Intel Won't Rattle IBM

Filed under
Hardware

While Apple Computer Inc.'s new embrace of Intel Corp. microprocessors leaves IBM in the cold, the news really isn't bad for Big Blue, which may have found the Apple account more trouble than it was worth.

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More in Tux Machines

Plans for Linux 4.20 and Progress on Linux 4.19

  • AMD Begins Staging AMDGPU Patches For Linux 4.20/5.0, Including FreeSync Refactoring
    With the DRM feature work for Linux 4.19 now in the kernel, AMD's stellar open-source driver team has begun staging their work-in-progress changes for the AMDGPU Direct Rendering Manager driver for the next kernel cycle. There is now drm-next-4.20-wip as part of AMD's development Git tree of the Linux kernel for Radeon/AMDGPU development. That's for "Linux 4.20" that will almost surely be renamed to "Linux 5.0" given Linus Torvalds' expressed versioning preference of bumping the major kernel version once hitting that number equal to all of his fingers and toes.
  • More AMDGPU Work For Linux 4.19 Has VCN + PSP Firmware Hookup For Future Hardware
    The good news is that the open-source AMD graphics team continues working on support for upcoming hardware, but the bad news is that it looks like their VCN video hardware might be a bit more locked down than it is now. With current Raven Ridge APUs there is VCN as "Video Core Next" as a replacement to UVD and VCE for video decoding and encoding, respectively. This dedicated hardware core for video encode/decode has been supported well now for some months on the open-source Linux graphics driver stack. The latest patches hitting the mailing list for hopeful integration to Linux 4.19 are a bit interesting and reveal a change for future hardware.
  • POWER Changes On The Way To Linux 4.19 Include More Spectre Work
    The POWER architecture changes have been submitted for the in-development Linux 4.19 kernel.
  • Qualcomm Adreno 600 Series Support Submitted For Linux 4.19
    Following the main DRM features update for Linux 4.19, a secondary pull request has now been submitted that offers up the nine thousand lines of code for bringing up the Adreno 600 series support for supporting the very latest Qualcomm Snapdragon SoCs. Last week Freedreno/MSM founder and maintainer Rob Clark proposed getting A6xx support into Linux 4.19 after this Direct Rendering Manager code has been reviewed and revised for months on mailing lists. These code contributions in part come from Qualcomm / Code Aurora and there are also Google developers working on it too, including the bring-up of A6xx support within the Freedreno Gallium3D driver. This A6xx device support is good enough for running various OpenGL test cases and other basic code. The Adreno 600 series hardware can be found in Snapdragon SoCs like the new Snapdragon 845, 730, and others.

Mir Has Partial Support For The NVIDIA Proprietary Driver, X11 Support Remains WIP

Canonical's team responsible for continuing to advance the Mir display server has been making good progress this summer on fleshing out some missing functionality. This week partial support for the NVIDIA proprietary driver was merged. In particular, the EGLStreams platform support. This is the initial bits for getting the NVIDIA proprietary driver to play along with Mir, but isn't yet the full implementation required to get OpenGL clients working on Mir with the NVIDIA driver. That work is still being pursued and is a work-in-progress. Mir's path for NVIDIA support is similar to that of the Wayland compositors with needing to implement EGLStreams and there not yet being any new Unix device memory allocation API that NVIDIA has been pushing for years to create the best of both worlds -- in terms of EGLStreams and GBM APIs for all driver vendors to agree upon. Read more Direct: Mir News: 17th August 2018

Lubuntu Plans Explained

  • Lubuntu Planning Switch To Wayland, Porting Openbox To Mir
    Ubuntu derivative Lubuntu that is now using the LXQt desktop environment has laid out more of their plans to switch over to Wayland rather than the existing X.Org based session. In order to achieve their Wayland support with the LXQt desktop, they intend to port the Openbox window manager to using the Mir display server and also leveraging QtLayerShell. Mir, of course, has been focused on Wayland compatibility the past year and is becoming quite solid as of late with its core Wayland protocol support.
  • Lubuntu Development Newsletter #9
    We’ve been polishing the desktop more, but work has been blocked by the still ongoing Qt transition. The 16.04 to 18.04 upgrade has now been enabled! Please do let us know if there’s any issues. Here’s a video we made when 17.04 went End of Life; the instructions are still current. Our main developer, Simon Quigley, became an Ubuntu Core Developer this past Monday! He now has access to the entire Ubuntu archive.

Devices/Embedded: Raspberry Pi, Librem and More

  • A Raspberry Pi-style computer you can build yourself: Blueberry Pi
    If buying a Raspberry Pi or one of the many other single-board computers available isn't a tough enough challenge, hacker Marcel Thürmer has sketched out enough details about his Blueberry Pi open-source hardware project to help the like-minded take things to the next level. As Thürmer wryly notes on the GitHub page where he's left the Blueberry Pi's schematics, this is just "another fruit single-board computer" based on the Allwinner V3s system on chip (SoC). However, while some single-board computer makers have open-sourced their hardware designs, unless you're building a large enough quantity, it's probably not worth the cost or effort.
  • Ethical aesthetics – Librem 5 design report #7
    You may have noticed that there is no obvious visual branding on the Librem laptops. While this was at first a technical limitation on the very first Librem model (back in 2015), the subtle and minimalistic branding that began on newer models in 2016 was a conscious design decision. Now, we’re hoping to refine the physical branding further. One reason for a minimalist design is aesthetic. Just like on a piece of hand-made jewelry, we wish the branding to be made in the form of an inconspicuous marking that doesn’t interfere with the natural beauty of the overall shape.
  • Intel launches seven NUCs with Coffee Lake and 10nm Canyon Lake CPUs
    Intel has launched five, barebones “Bean Canyon” NUC mini-PC kits equipped with 14nm, 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” CPUs starting at $299. It also unveiled two configured, Windows 10 equipped NUCs that tap its 10nm “Canyon Lake” chips.
  • Rugged, Linux-friendly embedded PC plugs you into the CANBus
    IEI announced an IP40-protected “DRPC-130-AL” DIN-rail computer with an Atom x5-E3930, CANBus, SATA, eMMC, 4x USB 3.0, dual HDMI and GbE, extended temperature support, and shock and vibration resistance. IEI’s fanless DRPC-130-AL may be the quintessential compact industrial embedded PC. Nothing much stands out except for the CANBus port, but IEI Technology has crammed a lot into a compact, 1.4 kg, 174 x 130 x 58.8mm chassis.