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Saturday, 25 May 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Reading Lines from Files in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

cat - The cat command is so called because (in the words of its man page) it “concatenates files and prints them to standard output.” So the command:

Green Party slams Microsoft OLPC involvement

Filed under
OLPC
Microsoft

The UK's Green Party has accused Microsoft of "unacceptable bribery" in trying to run Windows on the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project.

"Open source tools are a way to let the global south develop their own knowledge economies," Siân Berry, principal speaker for the Green Party, told vnunet.com in an email.

War for Linux Is Lost - Almost

Filed under
Linux

Now the Linux-based operating systems are rising. Linux is being run on numerous systems from Internet servers to employees' and home users' desktops. More and more companies (or even administrative bodies) are moving to Linux. The Linux advocates are trying to make us think this process shows the success of Linux and respectively UNIXes victory over Windows and fellows. Is it really so?

Firewall your applications with AppArmor

Filed under
Software

Traditional methods of securing a computer have revolved around controlling access to critical services. So, if you need to secure network applications, you need to police network traffic. But security vendors are realizing that securing a computer, in effect, boils down to protecting the applications instead. Novell's AppArmor is designed with just this is mind.

Linux is Evolution

Filed under
Linux

In my past life (ok, about 34 years ago) I was a Systems Programmer. This was back in the time of card punches and multi-million dollar mainframe computers. While I was still working at Hanford I bought a $400 microcomputer kit. It was made by SouthWest Technical Products and sported a 2MHz 6800 processor and 4KB of ram. My point is that computers are young. Jumping over to the Linux track, we can only see a bit less than 15 years of history.

Will Kanotix jump the Bandwagon?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over the last week, one of the most respected and well thought Debian based distributions "imploded" (See Tuxmachines Article). What makes this even more sad is the fantastic impact Kanotix has on new Linux desktop users. What really concerns me is the fact that Kanotix is considering switching to Ubuntu for a base. Why would this concern me? Do I have it out for Ubuntu? Allow me to explain...

Exaile - Amarok kinda player for GNOME

Filed under
Software

Exaile is a media player aiming to be similar to KDE’s AmaroK, but for GTK+. That is what I don’t like. I like the UI of Amarok. It’s much more cooler and modern. UIs based on GNOME generally sucks. Though Exaile is a good alternative compared to Rythmbox and other music players, it’s UI is still not as cool as Amarok.

Child's play: Sneaking a peek at the OLPC OS

Filed under
Linux
OLPC

The first One Laptop Per Child hardware devices are still months from deployment, but you can sneak a peek at their Sugar desktop environment and bundled applications by running an OS image under an emulator. It's a great way to finally get some hands-on time with this long-anticipated project, even though it's not perfect.

Unbreakable Linux still unproven, analyst warns

IT managers running Red Hat Linux should think carefully before making the switch to Unbreakable Linux, the new Linux distribution that Oracle Corp. announced last month.

Set gFTP as the Default Command Line FTP Client on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

gFTP is a great ftp client for Ubuntu Linux that provides both a GUI based experience as well as a command line client. There’s an easy way to switch between using the default ftp client and using gftp-text. First you’ll want to make sure that you’ve installed gFTP.

Installing Popular Applications On Your Ubuntu Desktop With Automatix2

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Although Ubuntu comes with lots of applications that can be installed on your desktop, there are still some applications that are available only from third-party repositories. Finding all these repositories and installing these applications manually is very time-consuming, but fortunately some people have created a script called Automatix2 (which is the successor to Automatix) which automates the task for you. It comes with a graphical interface so that you can run it from your desktop, and this tutorial describes how you do it.

From XMMS to Audacious: the history of a Winamp clone

Filed under
Software

One of the most used functions on any modern computer is the ability to play back music. From the first beeps and bloops in arcade machines, to the AdLib and the first Sound Blasters in home PCs, to the monstrosity of the 51 million transistor Sound Blaster X-Fi, people have listened and continue to listen to music on computers.

Network Interface Configuration Using ifconfig

Filed under
HowTos

You can configure a network interface from the command line using the basic Linux networking utilities. You configure your network client hosts with the command line by using commands to change your current settings or by editing a number of system files. Two commands, ifconfig and route, are used for network configuration. The netstat command displays information about the network connections.

Jono Bacon: Sensationalism takes a choke-hold

Filed under
Web

Oh dear. I used to like reading Groklaw and admired it for its accuracy and straight-down-the-line reporting. Recently though, I have felt it has become too much of a pulpit, and this post is just sensationalist clutching at straws.

Get your ABC's of Linux right

Filed under
Humor

Recently, one of my friends shared with me this rather funny ode to Linux which was passed on to him by a friend of his, which I am in turn sharing with you. So without much ado, here is the rhyming ode to Linux ...

Using multiple network cards in XEN 3.0

Filed under
HowTos

Xen is great. But installing more than one network card became a pain when I tried it the first time. There are some documents describing the principle but I was unable to find a real life example somewhere else. So this is a summary about how it works here now.

ET Live CD

Filed under
Gaming

An Enemy Territory live CD has been released recently by [*C]ascii at nixcoders.org. The CD is available in two versions, one including the nvidia, the other one utilizing the ati drivers for optimal support of your graphics card. More Here.

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More in Tux Machines

AMD Staging Another Fix To Try Correcting Some Raven Ridge Systems On Linux

AMD Raven Ridge APUs have been out for more than one year now and at least under Linux can still be quite problematic depending upon the particular motherboard BIOS and other factors. Fortunately, while Raven 2 and Picasso APU support is appearing to be in better shape, the AMD open-source developers haven't forgot about these problematic Raven 1 systems. Out today is the latest patch trying to help those with original Raven Ridge systems. This latest hopeful fix is now skipping over loading the DMCU firmware for Raven Ridge. DMCU in this context is the Display Micro-Controller Unit and is the micro-controller used for Panel Self Refresh (PSR) and similar functionality. Read more Also: Intel 19.20.13008 Open-Source Compute Stack Restores Broadwell To Production Quality

Graphics: Intel, XWayland and Vulkan

  • Intel Linux Graphics Driver Adding Support For The Mule Creek Canyon PCH
    Mule Creek Canyon is the PCH to be paired with Intel Elkhart Lake processors. Elkhart Lake as a reminder is the Gemini Lake SoC successor that will feature Gen11 class graphics and now thanks to the open-source Intel Linux graphics driver we know that new PCH is the Mule Creek Canyon. Mule Creek Canyon doesn't appear to be widely publicized up to this point but appeared in today's latest open-source development activity. Mule Creek Canyon is the new PCH for Elkhart Lake and required some minor changes around Port-C remapping that differ from other Icelake graphics hardware.
  • XWayland Receive An EGL-Based GLX Provider, Helping Various Games On Linux
    A notable improvement was merged into the "xserver" Git tree for the eventual X.Org Server 1.21 release that will improve the support for various Linux games relying on XWayland for running under a Wayland compositor.
  • Vulkan 1.1.109 Released With Two New Intel Extensions
    Vulkan 1.1.109 was released today as the latest update to this graphics/compute specification ahead of the US holiday weekend. With two weeks having passed since Vulkan 1.1.108 there are a few different documentation corrections/clarifications. There are also two new vendor extensions contributed by Intel.

Rob Szumski’s Keynote and Abby Kearns Interview at CloudNativeCon & KubeCon

GNOME: Theming, Mutter and Sprint 1

  • App Devs Ask Linux Distros to “Stop Theming Our Apps”
    A group of independent Linux app developers have written an open letter to ask wider GNOME community to ask: “stop theming our apps”. The letter is addressed to the maintainers of Linux distributions who elect to ship custom GTK and icons themes by default in lieu of upstream defaults. By publicising the issues they feel stem from the practice of “theming” it’s hoped that distros and developers might work together to create a “healthier GNOME third party app ecosystem”.
  • A Group of Independent Linux App Developers Has Asked Wider GNOME Community To 'Stop Theming' Its Apps
  • GNOME's Mutter Makes Another Step Towards X11-Less, Starting XWayland On-Demand
    GNOME 3.34 feature development continues at full-speed with a lot of interesting activity this cycle particularly on the Mutter front. On top of the performance/lag/stuttering improvements, today Mutter saw the merging of the "X11 excision" preparation patches. The Mutter patches by longtime GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho around preparing for X11 excision were merged minutes ago.
  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: New Background panel, Calendar search engine, GTK4 shortcut engine (Sprint 1)
    GNOME To Do is full GTK4 these days. Which means it’s both a testbed for new GTK4 features, and also a way to give feedback as an app developer for the GTK team. Unfortunately, it also means To Do is blocked on various areas where GTK4 is lacking. One of these areas is keyboard shortcut. Last year, Benjamin wrote a major revamp for keyboard shortcuts. As part of this cycle, I decided to rebase and finish it; and also make To Do use the new API. Unfortunately, I failed to achieve what I set myself to. Turns out, adding a shortcuts engine to GTK4 is more involving and requires way more context than I had when trying to get it up to speed. I failed to predict that one week would have not been enough to finish it all. However, that does not mean all the efforts were wasted! The rebasing of the shortcuts engine was a non-trivial task successfully completed (see gtk!842), and I also fixed a few bugs while working on it. I also got a working prototype of GNOME To Do with the new APIs, and confirmed that it’s well suited — at least for a simpler application such as To Do. In retrospect, I believe I should have been more realistic (and perhaps slightly pessimistic) about the length and requirements of this task.