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Saturday, 20 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Open source turns money-spinner

Filed under
OSS

Open source code, written by a community of thousands of software developers, has always been made freely available. But there are ways of making money from it, as David Reid finds out in Amsterdam.

Learning From Google

Filed under
Web

The top executives at Google recently admitted that they kind of let their employees invent and develop whatever they think is cool and the company has no problem putting it online to see what happens.

Global channel boss parts company with Novell

Filed under
Misc

Mark Hardardt, Novell's VP and general manager for partners and channels, has parted company with the software vendor.

AZ - Next hotbed of IT

Filed under
Web

Following in Intel's and Google's footsteps, EBAY plans to build a data center in Phoenix and hopes to have it open next year.

Helping Save the World

Filed under
Linux

Linux is saving the world.

Yes, you read that right. I wrote "is saving." Not "will save" or "has a chance to save."

Nope.

Is. Saving.

KOffice Meets the Users

Filed under
KDE

Are you using KOffice? What are you using KOffice for? Why did you decide to use KOffice? What are your main problems? We want to reach our users directly and ask them what they think.

Linux loses its religion

Filed under
Linux

EERO TEERIKORPI, who runs Continuent told us yesterday that the religious fervour that used to grip Open Source advocates has largely abated as the software matures and has become pervasive.

MyahOS 1.1 - Moving on up

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

MyahOS 1.1 was released less than a week ago and already it's gaining some momentum. The latest news on this wonderful slackware-based operating system is its new listing on Distrowatch. Being recognized and listed on distrowatch not only validates a developer's efforts, but also brings in more focus and users to an os. It's quite prestigious and an honor to be included in Distrowatch's listings considering there are still approximately 100 distros still waiting. MyahOS is quite deserving of this listing and today we are going to share with you some of those reasons.

Setting up your own APT repository with upload support

Filed under
HowTos

We've previously covered setting up your own repository for the Debian's apt-get system, but we didn't cover managing automatic uploads. Thankfully this is a simple task with the reprepro, and dupload tools and a small amount of scripting.

NIC Bonding/Teaming

Filed under
HowTos

The concept of NIC Bonding (or sometimes called NIC Teaming) is that you have two NICs bonded together to appear as if they are the same physical device. The ultimate goal of NIC teaming is limiting a "Single Point of Failure".

Cold War Screenshots

Cold War is a mixed third-first person shooter similar to Splinter Cell and follows the story of a freelance journalist who finds himself in the midst of an international conspiracy that aims to control the U.S.S.R. Phoronix has the screenshots!

Senator Seriously Injured After Jumping Off Cliff

Filed under
Humor

In a bizarre incident last week, U.S. Senator Fattecat (R-Washington State) fell off a 30-foot high cliff and sustained several broken bones. His spokesperson claims that the whole thing was "an accident", but the Humorix Vast Spy Network(tm) has uncovered the real reason for the cliff jump: the MPAA told him to.

Linux Lab sets its sites on the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

The Open Source Development Lab (OSDL) is preparing to aggressively move its Desktop Linux Initiative forward. Architects from over 20 key desktop-oriented Linux projects will gather Dec. 1-2 at the OSDL's Portland, Ore. headquarters to set strategic directions and standards, and find synergies amongst Desktop Linux organizations.

Fundamentals of Copyright Law

Filed under
Legal

The phrase "open source license" refers to a large number of agreements that license the copyrights inherent in software widely, fairly, and with the fewest restrictions possible. This article -- the first of two -- describes the tenets of copyright and explains the intents of an open source license.

n/a

SuSE Users' Panic Unfounded

Filed under
SUSE

Rumors circulating that Novell is going to kill off its popular Linux desktop lines are completely false.

Battle Over Mass. Anti-Microsoft Software Policy Widens

Filed under
OSS

The Massachusetts senate is considering legislation that could trump a month-old policy that required government agencies to adopt open document formats. The policy would roadblock adoption of Microsoft Office. Meanwhile, Sun and IBM are rallying support for open document formats.

Pocket guide covers popular desktop Linux distros

Filed under
Reviews

David Brickner came to the conclusion that the biggest obstacle to faster adoption of Linux on the desktop was that there's too much information available. So what does he do to remedy this situation? Write another book, of course!

First look at Windows Vista: Secure at last?

Filed under
Microsoft

At the MVP global summit in Redmond, Wash., I had the opportunity to hear from a number of Microsoft insiders, the guys who actually wrote the code, about their goals and philosophy in creating the new operating system.

A Beginning Look At MythTV

Filed under
Software

Television: we may grumble about its poor quality and the time it wastes, but we don't want to miss our favorite shows. MythTV to the rescue!

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More in Tux Machines

BSD: FreeBSD 12.0 Beta and Upgrading OpenBSD with Ansible

Graphics: XRGEARS and Arcan's Latest

  • XRGEARS: Infamous "Gears" Now On VR Headsets With OpenHMD, Vulkan
    Well, the virtual reality (VR) demo scene is now complete with having glxgears-inspired gears and Utah teapot rendering on VR head mounted displays with the new XRGEARS. Kidding aside about the gears and teapot, XRGEARS is a nifty new open-source project with real value by Collabora developer Lubosz Sarnecki. XRGEARS is a standalone VR demo application built using the OpenHMD initiative for tracking and Vulkan for rendering. XRGEARS supports both Wayland and X11 environments or even running off KMS itself. This code also makes use of VK_EXT_direct_mode_display with DRM leasing.
  • Arcan versus Xorg – Approaching Feature Parity
    This is the first article out of three in a series where I will go through what I consider to be the relevant Xorg feature set, and compare it, point by point, to how the corresponding solution or category works in Arcan. This article will solely focus on the Display Server set of features and how they relate to Xorg features, The second article will cover the features that are currently missing (e.g. network transparency) when they have been accounted for. The third article will cover the features that are already present in Arcan (and there are quite a few of those) but does not exist in Xorg.
  • Arcan Display Server Is Nearing Feature Parity With The X.Org Server
    The Arcan display server, which started off years ago sounding like a novelty with being a display server built off a game engine in part and other interesting features, is nearing feature parity with the X.Org Server. While most hobbyist display server projects have failed, Arcan has continued advancing and with an interesting feature set. Recently they have even been working on a virtual reality desktop and an interesting desktop in general. Arcan is getting close to being able to offering the same functionality as a traditional X.Org Server. If you are interested in a lengthy technical read about the differences between Arcan and X.Org, the Arcan developers themselves did some comparing and contrasting when it comes to the display support, windowing, input, font management, synchronization, and other areas.

CoC/Systemd Supremacy Over Linux Kernel

  • New Linux Code of Conduct Revisions: CoC Committee Added Plus Interpretation & Mediator
    The Linux Code of Conduct introduced last month that ended up being quite contentious will see some revisions just ahead of the Linux 4.19 stable kernel release. Greg Kroah-Hartman has outlined the planned changes as well as a new Code of Conduct Interpretation document. In the weeks since the Linux kernel CoC was merged, various patches were proposed but none merged yet. It turns out Greg KH was working in private with various kernel maintainers/developers on addressing their feedback and trying to come up with solutions to the contentious issues in private.
  • Some kernel code-of-conduct refinements
    Greg Kroah-Hartman has posted a series of patches making some changes around the newly adopted code of conduct. In particular, it adds a new document describing how the code is to be interpreted in the kernel community.
  • Systemd Adds Feature To Fallback Automatically To Older Kernels On Failure
    Systemd's latest feature is the concept of "boot counting" that will track kernel boot attempts and failures as part of an automatic boot assessment. Ultimately this is to provide automatic fallback to older kernels should a newer kernel be consistently failing. The feature was crafted over the past few months by Lennart Poettering himself to provide a way when making use of systemd-boot on UEFI systems it can automatically fallback to an older kernel if a newer kernel is consistently causing problems. This is treated as an add-on to the Boot Loader Specification. The systemd boot assessment is designed that it could also be used by non-UEFI systems and other boot platforms.

ODROID 'Hacker Board'

  • ODROID Rolling Out New Intel-Powered Single Board Computer After Trying With Ryzen
    While ODROID is most known for their various ARM single board computers (SBCs), some of which offer impressive specs, they have dabbled in x86 SBCs and on Friday announced the Intel-powered ODROID-H2. In the announcement they mentioned as well they were exploring an AMD Ryzen 5 2500U powered SBC computer, which offered fast performance but the price ended up being prohibitive. After the falling out with Ryzen over those cost concerns, they decided to go ahead with an Intel Geminilake SoC. Geminilake is slower than their proposed Ryzen board, but the price was reasonable and it ends up still being much faster than ODROID's earlier Apollolake SBC.
  • Odroid-H2 is world’s first Gemini Lake hacker board
    Hardkernel unveiled the Odroid-H2, the first hacker board with an Intel Gemini Lake SoC. The Ubuntu 18.10 driven SBC ships with 2x SATA 3.0, 2x GbE, HDMI and DP, 4x USB, and an M.2 slot for NVMe. When the Odroid-H2 goes on sale in November at a price that will be “higher than $100,” Hardkernel will join a small group of vendors that have launched a community backed x86-based SBC. This first open spec hacker board built around Intel’s new Gemini Lake SoC — and one of the first Gemini Lake SBCs of any kind — follows earlier Arm-based Odroid winners such as the Odroid-C2 Raspberry Pi pseudo clone and the octa-core Odroid-XU4.