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Monday, 19 Nov 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Happy GNU Year: Richard Stallman Talks About His First GNU Programs Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2014 - 9:19am
Story Touchscreen media players run Android KitKat Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2014 - 2:31am
Story An Update & Upgrade to Unit 00 Rianne Schestowitz 09/01/2014 - 1:52am
Story Linux 3.13 Kernel About To Land In Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 9:56pm
Story Intel Driver Picks Up More Improvements In Linux 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 8:47pm
Story Rollapp’s Online LibreOffice Nearly Ready for Prime Time – But Not Yet Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 8:24pm
Story Are Chromebooks hurting Apple as well as Microsoft? Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 8:08pm
Story Valve Ships An AMD Preview Driver For SteamOS Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 7:37pm
Story Where's Fedora 21 schedule? Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 7:23pm
Story KDE 4.11.5 Officially Released, Fixes over 65 Bugs Rianne Schestowitz 08/01/2014 - 6:43pm

Partition images with Partimage and Partimaged

Filed under
HowTos

This is a guide to create or restore images of your partitions using the great open source tool Partimage. It provides information on how to do this locally or across the network, by setting up a Partimaged Server.

Installing OpenOffice.org 2.0 for Debian

Filed under
HowTos

In this introductory article, Jon Watson provides an easy guide to installing the new Open Office source on non-rpm Linux systems. The emphasis is on the use of alien to help convert rpm packages for quick installation to the latest Debian releases.

Fud alert: Winning the Linux Wars

Filed under
Microsoft

It was the kind of scenario that used to strike fear into Microsoft partners' hearts, and Tim Marshall remembers it well. A midsize business was evaluating collaboration solutions, recalls Marshall, vice president of technology at Neudesic LLC, an Irvine, Calif.-based solution provider and Microsoft Gold Certified Partner.

Homegrown and Open Source to Get Last Laugh

Filed under
OSS

As 2005 was drawing to a close, there was a lot of activity surrounding a new twist on a very old idea: the compute utility. Well, to be more precise, utilities are an old idea that were perfected during that industrial revolution for water distribution (and other related public water works such as sewage disposal), transportation, energy distribution, and communications.

Strong growth for Debian

Filed under
Linux

Debian is currently the fastest growing Linux distribution for web servers, with more than 1.2 million active sites in December. Debian 3.1 was declared stable in July and it appears that both the anticipation of this release becoming stable, and the release itself, have generated new interest in Debian.

Driver education for Linux novices

Filed under
Linux

Last week's column on DSL Linux generated so many letters and loose ends that we're going to have to play catch-up this week. I left out the first rule of DSL Linux as it pertains to inexperienced computer users: It may not work with your hardware.

Fearless predictions from Propeller Heads

Filed under
Misc

Dear Propeller Heads: So, what will I have to buy, subscribe to, or learn about in 2006 to keep up with my Propeller Head friends?

Open Source for the Enterprise

Filed under
Reviews

For managers faced with the task of coming up with a corporate policy on open source – and then being faced with a welter of different licenses, competing products and different business models – this book might just be the guidebook to help. It aims to make sense of the different types of products, levels of maturity, support options and licenses that are essential factors in any kind of software policy.

Join the KDE Developers at FOSDEM 2006

Filed under
KDE

FOSDEM, the sixth Free and Open source Software Developers' European Meeting will be held on 25 and 26 February 2006 in Brussels. KDE will be present there to socialise, hack and take part in the wider Free Software community.

Power Color X800XL 256MB (ATI)

Filed under
Hardware

ATI Linux users seeking the ultimate in desktop performance are presently limited to the X850 series or FireGL V7100 for the workstation arena. We have an X800XL 256MB caressing our systems. The X800XL core packs in approximately 160 million transistors, 16 pixel pipelines, 6 vertex processors, 110nm manufacturing process, 256MB 256-bit video memory, 400MHz core, and 980MHz memory clock. Will this be enough to do justice to NVIDIA's GeForce 6800GT 256MB part under Linux?

Predictions for 2006: Operating systems

Filed under
OS

Microsoft says Windows Vista, its new client operating system, will be out in time for the 2006 holiday season. Novell and Red Hat will continue to try to crack Microsoft's domination on the desktop and server with new releases.

When Choice Matters: VectorLinux SOHO 5.1 rc2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

"VectorLinux is a small, fast, Linux operating system for Intel, AMD and x86 compatible systems, based on one of the original Linux distributions, Slackware." The developers put out released candidate 2 of the small office - home office edition on Jan. 4, 2006, and since we've never tested any Vector, we thought it was time. The soho edition, "as its name implies, is a distro aimed at Small Office and Home Office users."

SAMBA (Domaincontroller) Server For Small Workgroups With Ubuntu 5.10 "Breezy Badger"

Filed under
HowTos

This is a detailed description about the steps to set up a Ubuntu based server (Ubuntu 5.10 - Breezy Badger) to act as file- and print server for Windows (tm) workstations in small workgroups.

Day 3 at CES: What's hot

Filed under
Sci/Tech

This is day three at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), and for me, it's getaway day. The crowds at the show just seems to get bigger and bigger each day. Just trying to walk the aisles became a chore.

Red Hat disputes CERT vulnerability figures

Filed under
Linux

The open source community is up in arms after the publication of a 'misleading and confusing' report that said more vulnerabilities were found in Linux/Unix operating systems than in Windows last year.

Seeing the security forest for the trees

Filed under
Security

Over at NewsForge, the two writers point out that if you take US-CERT's annual summary of vulnerabilities at face value, you're likely to get the impression that Linux is lousy at security while Windows is great at it. If you believe that the sheer number alone of security problems openly found and fixed tells you the whole story, you really can't see the forests from the trees.

Input/Output redirection made simple in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Linux follows the philosophy that every thing is a file. For example, a keyboard, monitor, mouse, printer .... you name it and it is classified as a file in Linux. Each of these pieces of hardware have got unique file descriptors associated with it. Now this nomenclature has got its own advantages. The main one being you can use all the common command line tools you have in Linux to send, receive or manipulate data with these devices.

Microsoft Challenges Linux's Legacy Claims

Filed under
Microsoft

Tests run in Redmond's Linux lab seek to dispel the myth that Linux can run on anything, especially older legacy hardware.

Alternative input devices under Linux

Filed under
Hardware

The standard QWERTY keyboard dates from 1874. The computer mouse is a little more recent, but still comparatively ancient. Nowadays a number of alternative input devices are available for a wide variety of specialized needs. How well do they function under Linux? I put a few to the test in order to find out.

Linux happenings in ’06

Filed under
Linux

As we return to work this first week of 2006, Linux users with the post-holiday blahs, cabin fever or seasonal affective disorder should be glad to know there is a lot to look forward to this year.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel: EROFS, Heterogeneous Memory Management, Getting Involved, 4.20-rc3, and DRM ('Secure Output Protocol')

  • There Is Finally A User-Space Utility To Make EROFS Linux File-Systems
    Back when Huawei introduced the EROFS Linux file-system earlier this year, there wasn't any open-source user-space utility for actually making EROFS file-systems. Even when EROFS was merged into the mainline tree, the user-space utility was still non-existent but now that issue has been rectified.
  • The State Of Heterogeneous Memory Management At The End Of 2018
    Heterogeneous Memory Management is the effort going on for more than four years that was finally merged to the mainline Linux kernel last year but is still working on adding additional features and improvements. HMM is what allows for allowing the mirroring of process address spaces, system memory to be transparently used by any device process, and other functionality for GPU computing as well as other device/driver purposes. Jerome Glisse at Red Hat who has spearheaded Heterogeneous Memory Management from the start presented at last week's Linux Plumbers Conference on this unified memory solution.
  • An attempt to create a local Kernel community
    Now I am close to complete one year of Linux Kernel, and one question still bugs me: why does it have to be so hard for someone in a similar condition to become part of this world? I realized that I had great support from many people (especially from my sweet and calm wife) and I also pushed myself very hard. Now, I feel that it is time to start giving back something to society; as a result, I began to promote some small events about free software in the university and the city I live. However, my main project related to this started around two months ago with six undergraduate students at the University of Sao Paulo, IME [3]. My plan is simple: train all of these six students to contribute to the Linux Kernel with the intention to help them to create a local group of Kernel developers. I am excited about this project! I noticed that within a few weeks of mentoring the students they already learned lots of things, and in a few days, they will send out their contributions to the Kernel. I want to write a new post about that in December 2018, reporting the results of this new tiny project and the summary of this one year of Linux Kernel. See you soon :)
  • Feral Interactive Announces Total War: WARHAMMER II to Be Released for Linux Tomorrow, Uber Joined The Linux Foundation, Security Bug Discovered in Instagram, Fedora Taking Submissions for Supplemental Wallpapers and Kernel 4.20-rc3 Is Out
    Linux kernel 4.20-rc3 is out. Linus says the only unusual thing was his travel and that the changes "are pretty tiny".
  • Wayland Secure Output Protocol Proposed For Upstream - HDCP-Like Behavior
    Collabora developer Scott Anderson sent out a "request for comments" patch series that would add a Secure Output Protocol to the Wayland space. The Secure Output Protocol is for allowing a Wayland client to tell the compositor to only display if it's going to a "secure" output, such as for HDCP-like (High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection) configurations, but there is no mandate at the protocol level about what is the definition of secure -- if anything. This does not impose any DRM per se by Wayland but is mostly intended for set-top-boxes and other closed systems where a Wayland client can reasonably trust the compositor. The Wayland Secure Output Protocol is based upon the work done by Google on their Chromium Wayland code.

more of today's howtos

Best Linux Desktop Environments: Strong and Stable

A desktop environment is a collection of disparate components that integrate together. They bundle these components to provide a common graphical user interface with elements such as icons, toolbars, wallpapers, and desktop widgets. Additionally, most desktop environments include a set of integrated applications and utilities. Desktop environments (now abbreviated as DE) provide their own window manager, system software that controls the placement and appearance of windows within a windowing system. They also provide a file manager which organizes, lists, and locates files and directories. Other aspects include a background provider, a panel to provide a menu and display information, as well as a setting/configuration manager to customize the environment. Ultimately, a DE is a piece of software. While they are more complicated than most other types of software, they are installed in the same way. Read more

KDE neon upgrade - From 16.04 to 18.04

I am quite happy with the KDE neon upgrade, going from the 16.04 to the 18.04 base. I think it's good on several levels, including improved hardware support and even slightly better performance. Plus there were no crashes or regressions of any kind, always a bonus. This means that neon users now have a fresh span of time to enjoy their non-distro distro, even though it's not really committing to any hard dates, so the LTS is also only sort of LTS in that sense. It's quite metaphysical. On a slightly more serious note, this upgrade was a good, positive experience. I semi-accidentally tried to ruin it, but the system recovered remarkably, the post-upgrade results are all sweet, and you have a beautiful, fast Plasma desktop, replete with applications and dope looks and whatnot. I'm happy, and we shall bottle that emotion for when the need arises, and in the Linux world it does happen often, I shall have an elixir of rejuvenation to sip upon. KDE neon, a surprisingly refined non-distro distro. Read more