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Wednesday, 19 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firefox 24 for Linux gets native MP3, AAC and H.264 support srlinuxx 23/06/2013 - 7:54pm
Story Kernel Log: Coming in 3.10 (Part 2) srlinuxx 23/06/2013 - 7:52pm
Story FreeBSD, 20 years young srlinuxx 22/06/2013 - 7:06pm
Story State Of OpenIndiana srlinuxx 22/06/2013 - 7:03pm
Story Linux on Film: Dredd (2012) srlinuxx 22/06/2013 - 7:01pm
Story few odds & ends: srlinuxx 22/06/2013 - 4:20pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 22/06/2013 - 4:46am
Story How to Install and Configure srlinuxx 22/06/2013 - 4:42am
Story vitetris: Pick of the litter srlinuxx 22/06/2013 - 4:36am
Story System Manageability srlinuxx 22/06/2013 - 12:34am

Where are all the open source marketers?

Filed under
OSS

I spoke with a number of people who asked if I knew of any VP of Marketing types to join their open source company. The truth is I came up pretty much blank. Word on the street is that no less then six open source related companies are looking to fill that role.

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Playboy to hit Internet with digital edition

Filed under
Web

Playboy magazine, losing money in the face of depressed advertising, will go digital later this year in hopes of winning new subscribers and advertisers.

Lucasfilm Partners With HP For Special-Effects Technology

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The "Star Wars" company will use Hewlett-Packard software for film and video game effects. LucasFilm also did effects for the "Harry Potter" and "Jurassic Park" series, as well as the recent "War of the Worlds."

Real World Open Source: The TCO Question

Filed under
OSS

How much is this going to cost me? The question may be the lifeblood of business, but the answer is all too often an alchemy of knowns and unknowns, hard figures, and soft projections. Occupying the gap is a cottage industry of studies, surveys, analysts, and pundits weighing in on the big, bad, broad comparison of total cost of ownership (TCO) between commercial and open source software.

ECS KN1 Extreme

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

Previously ECS ELITEGROUP was known for economy class offerings, but there has been some success of late with a few different platforms in the enthusiast market by ECS, but associated with low cost "bang for the buck" type systems. When the nForce4 Ultra based KN1 Extreme arrived at my doorstep and I indulged in it's build and feature set, I must say I was quite impressed.

GeForce 7 restores balance

Filed under
Hardware

No other segment of the computer component manufacturing industry has seen such a dramatic level of price gouging as the graphics cards business. Street prices for Nvidia's 6-series and ATI's X800 neared the unprecedented $1000 mark. This time Nvidia launched the GeForce 7 in volume, bringing graphics card pricing back to a more reasonable level.

Some internet phone customers may be cut off

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Providers of Internet-based phone services may be forced next week to cut off tens of thousands of customers.

China`s online game addiction checked

Filed under
Gaming

Under a new "anti-online game addiction system", players who have played more than five hours, will be told every 15 minutes: "...please go offline immediately to rest."

n/a

Relax Bill, It's Google's Turn as the Villain

Filed under
Misc

Many in Silicon Valley are skittish about Google's size and power, and fret that its strengths are transforming it into a threat.

Multicore processors Nightmare or Nirvana?

Filed under
Hardware

The analyst firm said today that it believes the impact of multicore on the IT infrastructure will accelerate with each generation of multicore processors.

Halo game set for silver screen

Filed under
Gaming

A film version of popular video game Halo is being made by two Hollywood studios, its developers have confirmed.

Web of Crime: Internet Gangs Go Global

Filed under
Security

In the past, hackers and writers of malicious software (aka malware) were seeking attention and notoriety. Creators of viruses and worms were looking for bragging rights. Now they're after money.

8 Out Of 10 Enterprise PCs Spyware Infected

Filed under
Security

On average, enterprise PCs have 27 pieces of spyware on their hard drives, a 19 percent increase in the last quarter alone, while a whopping 80 percent of corporate computers host at least one instance of unwanted software, whether that's adware, spyware, or a Trojan horse.

Hitachi unveils world's first terabyte DVD recorder

Filed under
Hardware

Japan's Hitachi Ltd. on Wednesday unveiled the world's first hard disk drive/DVD recorder that can store one terabyte of data, or enough to record about 128 hours of high-definition digital broadcasting.

M$ desires that Linux prove its cost case

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

THE SOFTWARE equivalent to Wal Mart is engaged in negotiations with the Open Source Development Labs in a bid to resolve the issue about which OS is the cheapest to run.

OSI's Open Flap

Filed under
OSS

The goals of the OSI's license proliferation committee were thrown into question when the creator of the organization's manifesto was recently denied entrance.

Open Source: It's Still All about Control

Filed under
OSS

What do Microsoft's offer to do a joint, independent research project to analyze the benefits of Linux versus Windows, Miro fighting with Mambo's developers over Mambo management and Sun's Common Development and Distribution License all have in common? They're all about control.

Linux on a Fast-Food Diet

Filed under
Linux

Instead of the traditional car analogy, how about a restaurant analogy?

Consider McDonald's.

At one end, you have yourself, cook them yourself. At the other end, you have the five-star restaurant. Everything is handled for you, for a price. But what about the middle?

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Survey: Console Based Linux File Managers

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