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Friday, 20 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Schoolyard bullies get nastier online

Filed under
Web

When Joanne had a row with a longtime friend last year, she had no idea it would spill into cyberspace.

But what started as a spat at a teenage sleepover swiftly escalated into a three-month harangue of threatening e-mails and defacement of her Web log. "It was a nonstop nightmare," says Joanne, 14, a freshman at a private high school in Southern California. "I dreaded going on my computer."

US Advisory panel recommends more federal R&D spending

Filed under
Security

The Presidential IT Advisory Committee (PITAC) has recommended the federal government sharply increase its spending on cybersecurity R&D and shift the focus to fundamental, long-term solutions to security challenges.

"The IT infrastructure is highly vulnerable to premeditated attacks with potentially catastrophic effects," PITAC warned in a letter submitting the report, titled Cyber Security: A Crisis in Prioritization, to the president. "These vulnerabilities put the nation's entire critical infrastructure at risk."

Game bill picks up steam in Illinois

Filed under
Gaming

A bill introduced into the Illinois State House last December would supersede current ESRB ratings when it comes to video games with "violent and sexually explicit" content. The focus would be on isolating games deemed to have content not suitable for those under the age of 18 and would also attach a fine to retailers who violate the restriction on sales of those games.

$5m daily fine beckons for bad boy Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

Although the European Commission's statements are diplomatic to the point of opacity, there's no mistaking what it thinks of the latest turn in the Microsoft antitrust saga. The Commission doesn't think Microsoft's trying hard enough, and it has canvassed widespread industry support to bolster its position. From a Microsoft document unearthed by ZDNet, and still available here [PDF 450kb], we can see why even long time Redmond partners are losing their patience.

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Gentoo 2005.0 Now Shipping!

Filed under
Gentoo

Gentoo Linux 2005.0 for x86 is now complete, and we will begin fulfilling x86 pre-orders today! AMD64 and PowerPC should start shipping very shortly as well.

Please note that 2005.0 is not yet available for download on Gentoo mirrors -- the Store is getting 2005.0 a week in advance of it appearing on various Gentoo mirrors worldwide. This is a good thing, as it will give us several days to catch up on Store pre-orders.

The strange decline of computer worms

Filed under
Security

Although windows-centric, theregister has published an article on the lessening numbers of "Slammer-style worms". They attribute this decline to "the widespread use of XP SP2 and greater use of personal firewall" rendering "worms far less potent in the same way that boot sector viruses died out with Windows 95 and the introduction of Office 2000 made macro viruses far less common."

Linux Kernel Multiple Vulnerabilities

Filed under
Security

secunia.com has published "some vulnerabilities have been reported in the Linux kernel. One has an unknown impact, and the others can be exploited to cause a DoS (Denial of Service) and potentially compromise a vulnerable system."

Are you now, or have you ever been…a journalist?

Filed under
Legal

In response to that judge's decision in a Santa Clara County Superior Court to force the producers of the Mac blogs to reveal their sources in that apple law suite, theinquirer has quoted a very interesing article from Wendy M. Grossman on the subject of journalists and their rights to protect sources as it applies to bloggers. She cites many professionally paid and respected journalists publish blogs to the net everyday and asks are those not consider real news? The underlying premise...

Open Source Movie by TheWeblogProject

Filed under
Movies
OSS

TheWeblogProject premieres a revolutionary and innovative way to movie production, and one which according to its creators, may seriously start to challenge Hollywood in the near future.

TheWeblogProject is in fact the first grassroots film that will be freely distributed, via the Internet and via those very P2P networks seen today as the major threats to Hollywood own sustainability.

TheWeblogProject is the first movie in which everyone can actively participate by sending in video clips.

unix motorcycle

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

"some of you are probably rubbing your eyes, but you read it correctly. unix on a motorcycle.

a fellow by the name of ben installed a freebsd powered pc into his kawasaki z1000. a webcam on his helmet connects to a video capture board in the pc, which he uses to record movies of trips to the burrito store. his future plans are to have the freebsd box control his ipod, track gps data, and potentially interconnect with the bike’s ecu."

Story and links on hackaday.

Police smash child porn ring with raids across 12 countries

Filed under
Web
Legal

An article on theinquirer leads to a report detailing the arrest of "hundreds of people across two continents [...] in a Spanish-led operation to break a child pornography ring operating via the internet."

Have hackers recruited your PC?

Filed under
Security

BBC news has posted an article relating a study "by security researchers who have spent months tracking more than 100 networks of remotely-controlled machines. They discovered 'bot nets [were]used to launch 226 distributed denial-of-service attacks on 99 separate targets.'"

KDE 3.4 offers improved accessibility

Filed under
KDE

zdnet has a nice little article covering KDE 3.4 accessibility features. They say, "An improved colour scheme and a tool that reads out text should make KDE Linux desktop more usable for those whose vision is impaired."

"It's a huge improvement in accessibility," said Matthias Dalheimer, a KDE developer. "There is a new screen reading technology for visually impaired people and a much better colour scheme with icons that have a high contrast."

KDE DCop DoS Vulnerability prior to 3.4

Filed under
KDE
Security

Sebastian Krahmer has reported a vulnerability in KDE, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

The vulnerability is caused due to an error in the authentication process in the DCOP (Desktop Communication Protocol) daemon dcopserver. This can be exploited to lock the dcopserver for arbitrary local users. Successful exploitation may result in decreased desktop functionality for the affected user.

The vulnerability has been reported in versions prior to 3.4.

Solution: Upgrade to KDE 3.4 or apply patch.

Click for more information and links to patches.

Original information on dot.kde.org.

US cyber-security 'nearly failing'

Filed under
Security

Cyber-security in the US is "nearly failing" and has been given a "must try harder" D+ rating by the Federal government.

The US Office of Management and Budget set forth cyber-security standards in the Federal Security Management Act 2002, encouraging federal agencies to tighten their IT systems.

KDE 3.4 Unleashed

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
-s

Defined as a network transparent contemporary desktop environment for UNIX workstations similar to the desktop environments found under the MacOS or Microsoft Windows, KDE provides an easy-to-use highly customizable integrated graphical interface for today's most demanding tasks. These include email communication, newsgroup participaton, web surfing, instant messaging, graphic design and manipulation, multimedia capabilities thru audio and video applications, system monitoring, file managing, and even software package handling. Today we will look at the latest incarnation.

EPA Honors AMD with ENERGY STAR Certificate

Filed under
Hardware

AMD today announced that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) awarded AMD's Cool'n'Quiet(TM) technology with an ENERGY STAR(R) Certificate of Recognition for advancing computer energy efficiency. All AMD Athlon(TM) 64 desktop processors have the innovative Cool'n'Quiet technology, a system-level feature that lowers the power consumption of a computer whenever maximum performance is not needed. AMD received the certificate on March 15 in conjunction with the 2005 ENERGY STAR Awards Ceremony in Washington, D.C.

Open Source - the next big opportunity for consulting firms?

Filed under
OSS

Could Open Source prove to be the next big money-maker for the world's consulting giants? To date only IBM has really got behind open source, so there could be quite a "land grab" in the coming year as more firms seize its potential. Mick James, former Editor of Management Consultancy magazine, speaks with the executive director of the Open Source Consortium to find out more.

Linux drives Renault Formula 1

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

The Renault Formula 1 team is running simulations and crucial telemetry applications on Linux clusters from IBM, and it's pleased with the results.

The IT team behind the Renault Formula 1 team has dramatically cut the time it takes to test new features by using Linux, Renault said on Tuesday.

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More in Tux Machines

A brief history of text-based games and open source

The Interactive Fiction Technology Foundation (IFTF) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and improvement of technologies enabling the digital art form we call interactive fiction. When a Community Moderator for Opensource.com suggested an article about IFTF, the technologies and services it supports, and how it all intersects with open source, I found it a novel angle to the decades-long story I’ve so often told. The history of IF is longer than—but quite enmeshed with—the modern FOSS movement. I hope you’ll enjoy my sharing it here. Read more

Fact check: Linux developer accused of pedophilia in fake blog posts

Followers of some of Reddit’s Linux-devoted subreddits were recently greeted with an unusual and disturbing discovery: pro-pedophilia and anti-Semitic blog posts from the developer of Linux Exherbo, a Linux distribution with native cross-compiling package management. A website under the developer’s name featured a number of unsavory blog posts. Fortunately, the blog appears to be fake. The developer, Bryan Østergaard, normally posts updates to a LiveJournal page under the username kloeri, although the last update dates 2014. Earlier this week, someone shared to Reddit a different blog attributed to Østergaard with a handful of more recent blog posts explaining “why” he decided to create Exherbo. Read more

Open source code worth $600m contributed to Apache

Open source code valued at over $600 million was delivered by volunteer project contributors to the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in a single 12-month period. That's according to the Apache Software Foundation's (ASF) annual report for its 2018 fiscal year, which ended on 30 April. The report was released last week. ASF was established in 1999 and claims to be the world's largest open source foundation with more than 300 freely available, enterprise-wide projects that serve as the backbone for some of the most visible and widely used applications in computing today. Read more

RIP, Printrbot

  • Printrbot has shut down
    Printrbot, a popular Kickstarter-backed 3D printer company, has shut down, leaving only a barebones website and little explanation.
  • Pioneering desktop 3D printer maker Printrbot closes it doors
  • Printrbot Closes Doors, Saddening 3D Printing Fans Everywhere
    In a competitive market, it’s hard for any company to stay ahead of the others, and it’s a sad fact that even some of the most popular and long-lived companies succumb to heavy weather. Printrbot, founded in 2011, had legions of fans who loved its printers’ affordability, ease of assembly and use, and open source freedom. Printrbot 3D printers were 3D printers for the people – only a few hundred dollars, they provided access to 3D printing technology for people who hadn’t been able to afford it before, and although they were simple, they were high quality. Best of all, you could make them your own, tinkering with them and creating new and unique machines, as so many users did. The company was ethical, direct and honest. Some open source 3D printer companies just download files and don’t share. Printrbot dutifully shared its source files and was a rare true open source company.
  • 3D Printing Community saddened by closure of Printrbot 3D printers
    Open source 3D printer manufacturer Printrbot has announced the close of its business, citing poor sales as the reason for the decision. A simple statement on the Printrbot website from founder Brook Drumm reads: “Printrbot is closed. Low sales led to hard decisions. We will be forever grateful to all the people we met and served over the years. Thank you all.” For the time being, Drumm will reportedly be “unreachable” for comments, and plans to share his views and plans for this “final chapter” in due course. The 3D Printing Community however has take to social media in mourning of the company, with figures including Joel Telling (YouTube’s 3D Printing Nerd), Thomas Sanladerer, and Dr. Adrian Bowyer himself weighing in on the close.
  • Printrbot Shuts Down After Seven Years of Creating Open Source 3D Printers
    Printrbot, the 3D printing manufacturer which was founded in 2011 with the launch of its original Printrbot printer on Kickstarter, has announced that it's now sadly closing its doors.