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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 16 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Review: SolydXK 2013.04.06 srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 5:06pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 6:20am
Story GNOME 3.10 to Bring New Features srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 4:12am
Story Woe is Linux. Woe is Me. srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 4:10am
Story Move Aside, GTX 680: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 770 Review srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 4:00am
Story aseigo: App stores, vivaldi, & themes srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 3:59am
Story Shuttleworth gives up dream of Ubuntu toppling Windows srlinuxx 31/05/2013 - 1:03am
Story Getting Started With Fedora srlinuxx 30/05/2013 - 10:22pm
Story Open source: Its true cost and where it's going awry by Monty Widenius srlinuxx 30/05/2013 - 10:20pm
Story First Look: Linux Mint 15 “Olivia” srlinuxx 30/05/2013 - 10:02pm

Two LinuxWorld Awards for Joomla!

Filed under
OSS

Joomla!, breakoff from the Mambo project, has been awarded two prestigious awards at the Linux & Open Source Awards in London this month.

Senate Bill Sets Spring 2009 Demise for Analog Television

Filed under
Misc

Senate Commerce Committee staffers have drafted a bill setting April 7, 2009 as the date to end nationwide analog TV broadcasts and complete the switch to digital transmission. Bill Gates urged Congress to set a deadline quickly and argued it will be a boon to the economy.

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Why Linux Hosting is Gaining More Presence

Filed under
Linux

Any person interested in publishing any data on the Internet requires Web Hosting. Why now Linux is gaining more popularity.

Breezy, breezy everywhere

Filed under
Linux

Geeks running systems on new processor architectures IA64, HPPA and UltraSparc can now join the Ubuntu world following the release of unofficial Breezy Badger ports yesterday.

How Doomed Is It?

Filed under
Movies

As Doom fans await the first-person shooter's debut on the big screen, Paul Davidson of Wired magazine takes a sneak peek at the movie based on the game.

Climbing the Linux Mountain

Filed under
Linux

Sometime between the years 1995 and 2004, Linux reached the mainstream of computer users the world over. No longer was it all about Microsoft or the Mac. Now there was a new sheriff in town, and it was a penguin packing some serious heat.

Going Live with Elive

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Elive is a new linux distribution presented as an installable livecd. Its developers state that Elive is built from scratch based on Debian. They released version 0.3 on August 30 and claim it's "The first good release..." At the request of a friend, tuxmachines decided to take a look at Elive and see what we see. What we found was a different, stable, and complete operating system with a great look and original tools. It uses Enlightenment for the desktop environment in your choice of e16 or e17. This was my first look at e17 in person, so much of the coverage will undoubtedly focus on that. However with tools like their harddrive installer, Elive won't be slighted.

Cold War Linux Review

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

Cold War, developed by the Czech developer Mindware Studios has been watched by many Linux users since the first screenshots started to appear in may 2004. Today Linux-Gamers.net can bring you an exclusive Linux review of the game.

How Many Distros Must a Man Walk Down?

Filed under
Linux

So, I wanted to see what all the fuss was about, and in a fit of conformism, I installed Ubuntu this week.

App of the Month: KDissert

Filed under
KDE

KDissert is KDE's mindmapping tool. App of the Month interviews KDissert's author Thomas Nagy about why he started it, the relationship to BKSys and his plans for the future. There is also an overview to help you get started using this exciting application.

Should RISC OS be open sourced?

Filed under
OS

The debate over whether or not RISC OS should be open sourced took another turn this week when Peter Naulls argued that "certain parts" of the OS could be released under an open source licence. The State-side coder behind various ports including Firefox said this would ideally include "crucial parts that affect all users, even if they don't realise it.

KDE at German Events, October 2005

Filed under
KDE

October in Germany is filled with a lot of local Free Software events and KDE is present at them.

Debian release team: the plans for etch

Filed under
Linux

Steve Langasek has posted a long report on what the release team has been brewing on since Sarge's release - release blockers, goals and policy - and even a hint on when the next release might be.

Linux calling: Are cell phones ready?

Filed under
Linux

The Open Source Development Labs, an industry consortium devoted to improving Linux, plans to launch an initiative Monday to bring the open-source operating system to mobile phones.

n/a

Google Gets GAIM Guy

Filed under
OSS

It shouldn't be surprising that Google aggressively goes after the best talent in the business. Google's nascent IM business is apparently no exception.

Open Source Crowd Turns On One Of Its Own

Filed under
OSS

It's been a rough week for Marten Mickos, the chief executive of open source database maker MySQLAB.

Dumber people can run Linux

Filed under
Linux

FOR A COUPLE of years now I've had the idea that I should migrate my mail server to Linux. Fun! So: so far, so good.

Introducing the National Center for Open Source Policy and Research

Filed under
OSS

The public launch of the National Center for Open Source Policy and Research (NCOSPR) was announced today during a presentation at the Government Open Source Conference (GOSCON) hosted by the Oregon State University's Open Source Lab in Portland, Oregon.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation Zephyr Project Attracts IoT Developers and Tech Giants

The Linux Foundation has always been committed to welcoming companies and organizations of all sizes as part of its heritage and ongoing vision for opening technology for all to experiment with and to build things. The Zephyr Project, an open source project to build a real-time operating system (RTOS) for the Internet of Things (IoT), announced last week they grew their community of contributors with support for more than 100 developer boards and the addition of six new members. These industry and academic leaders include Antmicro, DeviceTone, SiFive, the Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, The Institute of Communication and Computer Systems (ICCS) and Northeastern University. Read more

GNU/Linux on Chromebooks

  • How to install Linux apps on your Chromebook
    Chromebooks are great because they're simple: there's a lot you can get done with web services without exposing yourself to the troubles and security issues that plague more complex platforms. But if you need to do a bit more with your Chromebook, you have a few options. Most Chromebooks these days allow you to install apps from the Google Play Store, which should fill most productivity gaps. If not, you'll soon have one more option: installing Linux apps. To be clear, you've been able to install Linux apps on Chromebooks for years because Chrome OS is Linux. But, it's about to get much easier.
  • Top 5 Features Still Missing From Chrome OS
    Google’s Chrome OS gets a lot of things right, and the platform has evolved considerably over the years. Not only does it offer an always up-to-date version of the Chrome browser, but there are also Android apps, stylus input, and even Linux support on some devices. However, Chrome OS is far from perfect. You have to make compromises if you choose to live with a Chromebook, but you shouldn’t have to make quite this many. Here are the top five things Google should fix.
  • Walmart's selling an all-aluminum Chromebook with a comfy keyboard for just $220
    If you’re not considering a Chromebook when you're shopping for a notebook, you’re doing it wrong. Google's low-cost laptops are typically light, fast, secure, and have almost everything you need for remote work a.k.a. the Internet. Today, you can get in on the action for a great price. Walmart is selling the Acer Chromebook 14 (CB3-431-C6ZB) for $220. That’s about $30 to $40 cheaper than you’d usually pay for this laptop.

Microsoft Versus Linux

OSCON 2018 Events Coverage by LWN

  • Using AI on patents
    Software patents account for more than half of all utility patents granted in the US over the past few years. Clearly, many companies see these patents as a way to fortune and growth, even while software patents are hated by many people working in the free and open-source movements. The field of patenting has now joined the onward march of artificial intelligence. This was the topic of a talk at OSCON 2018 by Van Lindberg, an intellectual-property lawyer, board member and general counsel for the Python Software Foundation, and author of the book Intellectual Property and Open Source. The disruption presented by deep learning ranges from modest enhancements that have already been exploited—making searches for prior art easier—to harbingers of automatic patent generation in the future.
  • Diverse technical topics from OSCON 2018
    The O'Reilly Open Source Conference (OSCON) returned to Portland, Oregon in July for its 20th meeting. Previously, we covered some retrospectives and community-management talks that were a big part of the conference. Of course, OSCON is also a technology conference, and there were lots of talks on various open-source software platforms and tools. An attendee who was coming back to OSCON after a decade would have been somewhat surprised by the themes of the general technical sessions, though. Early OSCONs had a program full of Perl, Python, and PHP developer talks, including the famous "State of The Onion" (Perl) keynote. Instead, this year's conference mostly limited the language-specific programming content to the tutorials. Most of the technical sessions in the main program were about platforms, administration, or other topics of general interest, some of which we will explore below.