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Tuesday, 15 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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JBoss Denies Novell Claim of License Change

Filed under
SUSE

Red Hat Inc's JBoss division has denied that it has made any licensing changes that would have prompted Novell Inc to drop its Java application server from its SUSE Linux Enterprise distribution.

Web Browser Smackdown: IE7 vs. Firefox 2 vs. Opera 9

Filed under
Software

Right at this moment, big changes have or are about to occur in three well-known browsers: Internet Explorer is finally being updated, with version 7 in its third beta and almost ready to roll out the door; Firefox is also ripening an upgrade beta for its Version 2.0—it's in beta 1; and finally Opera, which has a devoted but smaller following, has recently come out with Version 9.0. So, three new browsers in the same year, after no action for a half decade. How do they stack up?

Dual-booting Windows and Linux the easy way

Filed under
HowTos

The Gnome Partition Editor Live CD is a simple tool that will shrink a (usually "the") Windows partition on your hard drive, then make Linux partitions almost automatically. These four videos step you through the process of downloading GPartEd (the program's nickname) from SourceForge.net, defragmenting Windows, shrinking your Windows partition, and installing the three most commonly-used Linux partitions. As a free bonus, a fifth video will show you how to uninstall Linux and stretch your shrunk-down Windows partitition until it once again takes up your whole hard drive.

SCO Claims IBM Destroyed Crucial Evidence

Filed under
Misc

The SCO Group versus IBM lawsuit is growing ever more desperate--and ever more weird. The latest twist: Buried in a new filing from SCO is a claim that International Business Machines destroyed evidence.

Galician Government Representative Meets KDE Translators

Filed under
KDE

Last Saturday, a representative from the Galician Government in Spain met members of the Trasno project. This project includes Free Software volunteer translators for the Galician language, from a wide range of Free software projects including KDE.

Free and Open Source Software at the United Nations

Filed under
OSS

A digital divide exists between communities in their access to computers, the Internet, and other technologies. This article looks at how various United Nations agencies use free and open source software to meet the goal of putting technology at the service of people around the world.

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Security: The adventure continues — SELinux

Filed under
HowTos

An advantage of upgrading to the latest Fedora Core version (5) is the latest and greatest in SELinux advances. I mentioned in a previous article that a plethora of Linux kernel improvements were available, and SELinux was one of them.

Please Submit your Open Source Resume in Word

Filed under
Misc

I had email today from Studio B. Apparently they are looking for technical writers in some specific areas. I'm neither interested nor qualified (and if elected, I will not serve) but I had to raise my eyebrows at this kicker: If this is of interest, please submit your resume, in Microsoft Word format...

A Gentoo diary part 1

Filed under
Gentoo

It's been a while since I promised to write about my Gentoo desktops. In the intro, I gave some general information about Gentoo, and explained my setup. This time I set up an old 300 mHz server with Gentoo, tried to make distributed compiling work, learned a bit more about Windowmaker, tried to get a Broadcom Wireless card working on a laptop, switched to Grub, and finally got rid of Xmms.

Shuttleworth computer labs ransacked

Filed under
Misc

Two of the computer laboratories set up in Cape Town schools by the Shuttleworth Foundation were ransacked during the three-week school holiday which ended on Friday.

Report advocates open-source approach for software acquisition

Filed under
OSS

A recently released Defense Department report on technology development methodologies advocates more use of open-source software and suggests ways it can be incorporated into the procurement cycle. Resuse can save money by promoting reuse of software across the different defense agencies, the report contends.

Realising the true value of Freedom

Filed under
OSS

Many people who use free software including GNU/Linux take it for granted and do not even think twice about supporting the software they enjoy using. But suppose tomorrow, the rule of law passes a decree that using GPLed free software is against the law and prohibits the sharing of free software including GNU/Linux distributions.

Making the message stick

Filed under
OSS

What is a freedom league without a bit of guerrilla branding? In an effort to increase the exposure of its cause, the Geek Freedom League (GFL) is calling on geeks to use GFL-branded stickers in ingenious ways.

UI Improvements in Evolution 2.8

Filed under
Software

Four months, in GNOME 2.16 cycle, We have added a lot of UI improvements to Evolution to make it look much better. Not just features and lot of bug fixes too!!! I have blogged them in parts. Im summarising all of them.

The State of ATI Linux

Filed under
Hardware

Well well, the day has finally come. It is now day number 50; the final day for this ATI Linux trial. With that said, it's about time for me to share some concluding remarks regarding ATI's recent Linux efforts with their monthly fglrx display drivers. On the first day, I didn't know whether I would be able to survive without going green (no pun intended), but towards the end of this experience, it was almost like achieving nirvana.

Create a secure Linux-based wireless access point

Filed under
HowTos

Wi-Fi Protected Access version 2 (WPA2) is becoming the de facto standard for securing wireless networks, and a mandatory feature for all new Wi-Fi products certified by the Wi-Fi Alliance. We all know the security weaknesses of its predecessor, WEP; this time they got it right. Here's how to implement the WPA2 protocol on a Linux host and create a secure wireless access point (WAP) for your network.

Also: WiFi Radar eases connections

Cross-platform cross-environment RPC server creation

Filed under
HowTos

Using XML-RPC it is possible to write software that can be accessed remotely by multiple means, from Ruby and Python to Perl and Ajax. Using a couple of simple libraries it is possible to setup a simple server in only a few minutes, with no need to worry about argument parsing, anything complex.

openSUSE 10.1 package manager fix due this week

Filed under
SUSE

"We love openSUSE, but we hate openSUSE's package management problems," Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, DesktopLinux.com's resident Linux curmudgeon, reports from his vacation. But there's good news: a fix is coming soon, he says.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: Samba, newt-lola, Kano, Python and More

  • Samba 4.10 RC1 Released: Adds Offline Domain Backups, Now Defaults To Python 3
    Samba 4.10 release candidate 1 was announced today as the open-source SMB implementation with support for Windows Server and Active Directory domains. The Samba 4.10 release is bringing export/restore features for Group Policy Objects (GPO), pre-fork process model improvements, support for offline domain backups with the samba-tool domain backup command now supporting an offline option, support for group membership statistics within a domain, Python 3 is now considered the default Python implementation while Python 2 support is retained, JSON logging improvements, and other work.
  • newt-lola
    Bison and Flex (or any of the yacc/lex family members) are a quick way to generate reliable parsers and lexers for language development. It's easy to write a token recognizer in Flex and a grammar in Bison, and you can readily hook code up to the resulting parsing operation. However, neither Bison nor Flex are really designed for embedded systems where memory is limited and malloc is to be avoided. When starting Newt, I didn't hesitate to use them though; it's was nice to use well tested and debugged tools so that I could focus on other parts of the implementation. With the rest of Newt working well, I decided to go take another look at the cost of lexing and parsing to see if I could reduce their impact on the system.
  • Kano Scores a Disney Partnership, Announces a Star Wars Kit for Later This Year
    Kano creates killer little sets to teach kids how to code and beyond (like the awesome Harry Potter Coding Kit), and today the company is announcing a Disney partnership. The first product will be a Star Wars kit. While other info is scant at the time, Kano says the Star Wars kit will be out “in the second half of 2019.” Alex Klein, Kano’s CEO and co-founder, only teased other details, saying that “Collaborating with Disney is a blessing. We can combine connected, creative technologies with some of the most memorable stories ever told.”
  • GDA and GObject Introspection: Remember 1
  • No really, pathlib is great
  • Top Seven Apps Built With Python
  • Turn video into black and white with python
  • Happy Mu Year 2019!
  • Python 101: Episode #42 – Creating Executables with cx_Freeze
    In this screencast, we will learn how to turn your Python code into a Windows executable file using the cx_Freeze project.
  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #351 (Jan. 15, 2019)

Games: Demonizer, Taste of Power, Road to your City and More

Security: Software Security is a Civil Right, Security Isn’t a Feature, Metasploit and Software Updates

  • Software Security is a Civil Right!
  • Security isn’t a feature
    As CES draws to a close, I’ve seen more than one security person complain that nobody at the show was talking about security. There were an incredible number of consumer devices unveiled, no doubt there is no security in any of them. I think we get caught up in the security world sometimes so we forget that the VAST majority of people don’t care if something has zero security. People want interesting features that amuse them or make their lives easier. Security is rarely either of these, generally it makes their lives worse so it’s an anti-feature to many. Now the first thing many security people think goes something like this “if there’s no security they’ll be sorry when their lightbulb steals their wallet and dumps the milk on the floor!!!” The reality is that argument will convince nobody, it’s not even very funny so they’re laughing at us, not with us. Our thoughts by very nature blame all the wrong people and we try to scare them into listening to us. It’s never worked. Ever. That one time you think it worked they were only pretended to care so you would go away. So it brings us to the idea that security isn’t a feature. Turning your lights on is a feature. Cooking you dinner is a feature. Driving your car is a feature. Not bursting into flames is not a feature. Well it sort of is, but nobody talks about it. Security is a lot like the bursting into flames thing. Security really is about something not happening, things not happening is the fundamental problem we have when we try to talk about all this. You can’t build a plausible story around an event that may or may not happen. Trying to build a narrative around something that may or may not happen is incredibly confusing. This isn’t how feature work, features do positive things, they don’t not do negative things (I don’t even know if that’s right). Security isn’t a feature. So the question you should be asking then is how do we make products being created contain more of this thing we keep calling security. The reality is we can’t make this happen given our current strategies. There are two ways products will be produced that are less insecure (see what I did there). Either the market demands it, which given the current trends isn’t happening anytime soon. People just don’t care about security. The second way is a government creates regulations that demand it. Given the current state of the world’s governments, I’m not confident that will happen either.
  • Metasploit, popular hacking and security tool, gets long-awaited update
    The open-source Metasploit Framework 5.0 has long been used by hackers and security professionals alike to break into systems. Now, this popular system penetration testing platform, which enables you to find, exploit, and validate security holes, has been given a long-delayed refresh. Rapid7, Metasploit's parent company, announced this first major release since 2011. It brings many new features and a fresh release cadence to the program. While the Framework has remained the same for years, the program was kept up to date and useful with weekly module updates.
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • [Slackware] New VLC and Flash
    AV1 is a new video codec by the Alliance for Open Media, composed of most of the important Web companies (Google, Facebook, Netflix, Amazon, Microsoft, Mozilla…). AV1 has the potential to be up to 20% better than the HEVC codec, but the patents license is totally free. VLC supports AV1 since version 3.0.0 but I never added the ‘aom‘ decoder/encoder to my vlc package, since ‘aom’ is the reference implementation of the video format and it does not really perform. The VideoLAN and FFmpeg communities are collaborating on ‘dav1d’ to make this a reference optimized decoder for AV1. Now that ‘dav1d’ has an official release I thought it would be cool to have in the VLC package. Mozilla and Google browsers already have the support for AV1 video playback built-in, so… overdue here.

Android Leftovers