Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 19 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story AST DRM Display Driver Updated For Linux 3.16 Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2014 - 4:03am
Story Linux Mint 17 Cinnamon and MATE screenshot preview Rianne Schestowitz 19/05/2014 - 3:55am
Story Ubuntu Is Now Running on World's Fastest Supercomputer Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:15pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:11pm
Story SlateKit Base OS Released For The Nexus 7 Tablet Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:10pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:10pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:08pm
Story Slackware-Based Salix Openbox 14.1 Beta 1 Is Out and Ready for Testing Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:07pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 9:06pm
Story AMD Radeon R9 290 On Ubuntu 14.04 With Catalyst Can Beat Windows 8.1 Rianne Schestowitz 18/05/2014 - 8:52pm

The Zen of Open Source

Filed under
OSS

"Open source is not just a matter of altruism--it's also good economic sense," said Sun Microsystems' Simon Phipps (pictured) in a recent speech. "Sun has now contributed more lines of open source code than any other organization, including the University of California, Berkeley," he said.

Issue 13 of Free Software Magazine

Filed under
OSS

Issue 13 of Free Software Magazine brings you a bunch of fine articles covering various aspects of the free software world. We have Richard Fennimore showing us how to spruce up Ubuntu, Robin Monks plays with a few of the best Tetris clones and John Goerzen tells you who to call for your free software phone needs. Plus, Robert Pogson teaches us how to set up class using Edubuntu, LTS and thin clients and much more... Download.

Bash typecasting

Filed under
HowTos

A recent post here mentioned typecasting in the shell. I responded by advising the poster to use some other language for his scripting needs. My feeling is that while I do appreciate that Bash can be used for complicated tasks, I just don't see the point.

Nvclock 0.8beta2

Today a new beta version of NVClock a tweaking tool for Nvidia videocards has been released. The new version contains tons of bugfixes and support for the latest videocards.

Put your laptop to sleep

Filed under
HowTos

Part of proper power management is the ability to put your laptop to sleep. ACPI sleep is defined as a state where the system is still technically powered on, but the screen and hard disk are powered down and the computer is using just enough power to keep the contents of RAM alive. The Ubuntu development team has devoted an immense amount of effort toward getting ACPI power management working properly.

Novell bans proprietary Linux modules

Filed under
SUSE

In a change of heart, Novell has ceased distributing proprietary software modules such as 3D video drivers that plug into the Linux kernel.

Autodesk Unveils Linux Supported Maya 8

Filed under
Software

Autodesk launched Autodesk Maya 8 software, the newest version of its Academy Award-winning 3D modeling, animation and rendering solution. Maya has been used by a variety of clients, including BMW, CNN, Disney, Epic Games, Industrial Light & Magic, Midway Games and Weta Digital, to create breathtaking 3D imagery for feature films, interactive games, broadcast graphics and industrial design.

KOffice 1.6 Alpha Released

Filed under
KDE
Software

Swiftly following the latest bugfix release for KOffice 1.5, the KDE Project today announced the release of KOffice 1.6 alpha. This is the first preview release for KOffice 1.6, scheduled for release this October.

Mandriva 2007 Beta 1

Filed under
MDV
Reviews
-s

Like everyone else in Linuxville, I've been looking forward to the release of Mandriva's first 2007 beta. When it began appearing on mirrors Sunday, I immediately began the download of the i586-x86_64 DVD. It took almost 24 hours to download, but it made it. Was it worth the bother?

Symphony OS marches to a different drum

Filed under
Linux

Symphony OS is a GNU/Linux distribution designed to innovate from the ground up. Although originally based on Knoppix and now on Debian stable, it quickly differentiates itself from the bulk of distros by implementing the ideas articulated in a so-called grey paper on user interface design by Jason Spisak, one of the co-founders of Lycoris. Often, Symphony's implementations challenge UI assumptions on any platform.

Oracle to distribute Red Hat?

Filed under
Linux

Larry Ellison has stirred up the Linux market again, sparking speculation Oracle may start shipping a cut-price version of Red Hat

Free software without the strings

Filed under
Software

When I see something free, I always look for the hidden cost such as those presented to me with pop-up ads. Free smiley faces? I don’t bite. Free cursors? No, thank you. But sometimes the extra work is worth it when you find a piece of free software that does the same job as a program that costs more than $50.

Linux needs to disappear

Filed under
OS

Okay, I confess that I chose this headline to draw you into this blog entry. A more accurate headline would be "Operating systems need to disappear". But I don't want my meaning to be misconstrued. The term "operating systems" would have to include proprietary operating systems.

Apache's Java brings Harmony to the world

Filed under
Software

THE FOLKS are churning code like there's no tomorrow at Apache's Project Harmony. The goal is to build a Java VM compatible with Sun's specifications and now the people have quietly released test binary snapshots.

Open Source Lures Cost Conscious CIOs

Midmarket CIOs who yearn for high-end functionality but can't foot the bill are turning to emerging open source vendors. Although there are risks, experts say it's an opportunity to get in on cutting-edge technology for a more reasonable price.

Tabbing Through Firefox 2.0

Filed under
Moz/FF

How many tabs can you fit in one Firefox 2.0 window? While not as culturally stimulating as the Tootsie Pop question, it is nonetheless one of the new features explored in this mini-review of Firefox 2.0 Beta 1.

Sharing a printer to Windows XP clients with Samba and Cups

Filed under
HowTos

Setting a printer in Debian Sarge from scratch and make it available for Windows XP clients on a LAN can be difficult, but using CUPS and samba it should be fairly straightforward if you have a supported printer. Here we will demonstrate how to do this.

n/a

MEPIS grundgingly complies with the GPL

Filed under
Linux

MEPIS LLC, the popular Ubuntu-based Linux distributor, has finally released its distribution source code under the GPL. Warren Woodford, the Morgantown, WV-based company's CEO, is not one bit pleased with being forced to do so.

Learn Perl in 10 easy lessons - Lesson 4

Filed under
HowTos

In the previous lesson we learnt about If statements and loops. We also started to study how to open files and how to write and read into them. In this lesson we will learn how to compare strings and we will study some advanced techniques for parsing files.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • The Serverless Show: The Importance of Open Source & Community Involvement
    “I’m also involved with some open source projects. I started with Node community and helping out with some node libraries a long time ago. Now I’m mostly doing serverless-related things. I joined the Claudia.js team a long time ago, almost at the beginning, and helped Gojko Adzic and Alexander Simovich to build Claudia.js. Claudia was and still is a deployment library for AWS Lambda and API gateway. At the beginning, it was really hard to deploy serverless applications. If you tried to do that manually, you need to zip everything, to set the permissions, and things like that. The idea of Claudia was to extend AWS CLI tools and to help users deploy serverless applications easier. We continued doing Claudia and a few other things. We contributed a bit to AWS SAM and we built some other applications that are open source. We’re trying to build tools that we need and that the serverless community needs.”
  • Expect to Hear More About Open Source’s Role in Security [Ed: Security implemented with proprietary software is almost always fake. The Australian back doors ("encryption") bill is a reminder of it. If something is proprietary, one must assume back doors (even mandated from above, hidden in binaries)]
    Will 2019 be the year there is a big push for consolidation between open source and cybersecurity? Yes, said Sanjay Beri, CEO of Netskope, in an email comment. IBM’s acquisition of Red Hat could prove to be the game changer in how organizations approach security.
  • Want to Save Some Money? Check out These Free Software Alternatives
    The list covers drawing and design, animation and film, website building, and others. For example, Ghost Malone presents several free alternatives to drawing, design and post-processing, such as GIMP, Krita, Fire Alpaca, Autodesk Sketchbook, MediBang Paint, and Paint.NET. Another example, for editing vector graphics, is Inkscape, which is free and open source. The list goes on with several choices depending on what you're looking for.
  • A free and open source Bitcoin trading tool has been developed by two students
    University students Jonathan Shobrook and Aaron Lichtman have created a free and open source automated trading bot to use on the Bitstamp exchange.
  • Thank Stanford researchers for Puffer, a free and open source live TV streaming service that uses AI to improve video-streaming algorithms
  • Open Source To Open Newer Avenues For CIOs In 2019
    Open source plays a crucial role in all the top strategic technology trends that are reshaping the IT world. Rajarshi Bhattacharyya, Country Head, SUSE, looks at the key trends for 2019 that organizations need to explore and in explains how open source technologies and practices open up a window of opportunities for the CIOs in the coming days.
  • The High Profile Team of Handshake Looks to Truly Open the Internet with a New Domain Name System
    Unlike other major blockchain based companies like Ethereum, they chose to avoid ICO funding altogether and went straight for private investors. They were able to obtain major private investment funding from companies such as Polychain Capital, A16Z Crypto, and Founders Fund (purchasing 7.5% coin supply of HNS between them at $10.2M) with the idea that they could be responsible for replacing entire layers of Domain Name System (DNS) layering. This removes the need for those who safeguard these layers, saving future companies large amounts of cash up front.
  • Handshake is attempting to make the Internet more open
    Handshake came out of stealth mode last August. The project, which intends to replace various levels of the Domain Name System (DNS) hierarchy, was founded by Joseph Poon (co-creator of the Lightning Network & Plasma), Andrew Lee (co-founder & CEO of Purse), Andrew Lee (co-founder & CEO of Private Internet Access), Boyma Fahnbulleh (Bcoin developer), and Christopher Jeffery (Creator of Bcoin & CTO of Purse). Sidestepping the ICO route popularized by Ethereum, Handshake raised private funding from a slew of investors including A16Z Crypto, Polychain Capital, and Founders Fund. These investors purchased 7.5% of the initial coin supply of HNS, Handshake’s native token, for $10.2M, valuing the protocol at $136M.
  • Google remains the top open-source contributor to CNCF projects
    According to the latest data from Stackalytics, a project founded by Mirantis and hosted by the OpenStack Foundation that visualizes a company’s contribution to open-source projects, Google remains the dominant force in the CNCF open-source ecosystem. Indeed, according to this data, Google is responsible for almost 53 percent of all code commits to CNCF projects. Red Hat, the second biggest contributor, is far behind, with 7.4 percent. The CNCF is the home of Kubernetes, the extremely popular container orchestration service that Google open sourced, so the fact that Google is the top contributor may not seem like a major surprise. But according to this data, Google would still be the top code contributor to all CNCF projects without even taking Kubernetes into account. In part, that’s due to the fact that Google is also the major contributor to GRPC, a queuing project the company donated to the CNCF, and Vitess, the database clustering system it developed for YouTube.
  • Google Remains Top Open-Source Contributor
    According to a scan of code contributions to projects sponsored by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) remains by far the largest contributor of code across all projects. Using a tool called Stackalytics, the survey conducted by open-source infrastructure vendor Mirantis found that Google accounted for 52.9 percent of code commits to CNCF projects.
  • Johnson Controls to Introduce Open-Source Software for Targeting Retrofits

Server Side Public License (SSPL), Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat/Fedora decide MongoDB’s SSLP doesn’t fit
    MongoDB’s January blues deepened this week as the team behind the Red Hat-backed Fedora Linux distribution confirmed it had added the open source database’s Server Side Public License to its “bad”list. The move came as it emerged Red Hat – Fedora’s sponsor – had nixed MongoDB support in RHEL 8.0.
  • AWS Raised Its Hand Lest Of Open Source Platform
    Even though AWS stands by MongoDB as the best the customers find it difficult to build and vastly accessible applications on the open-source platform can range from multiple terabytes to hundreds of thousands of reads and writes per second. Thus, the company built its own document database with an Apache 2.0 open source MongoDB 3.6 API compatibility. The open-sources politics are quite difficult to grasp. AWS has been blamed for taking the top open-source projects and re-branding plus re-using it without providing the communities. The catch here is that MongoDB was the company behind putting a halt to the re-licensing of the open-source tools under a novel license that clearly stated the companies willing to do this will have to purchase a commercial license.
  • Red Hat gets heebie-jeebies over MongoDB's T&Cs squeeze: NoSQL database dropped from RHEL 8B over license
    MongoDB justified its decision last October to shift the free version of its NoSQL database software, MongoDB Community Server, from the open-source GNU Affero General Public License to the not-quite-so-open Server Side Public License (SSPL) by arguing that cloud providers sell open-source software as a service without giving back. The following month, and not widely noticed until this week, Red Hat said it would no longer include MongoDB in version 8 of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The removal notice came in the release notes for Red Hat Enterprise Linux Beta 8.0. Under section 4.7, the release notes say, "Note that the NoSQL MongoDB database server is not included in RHEL 8.0 Beta because it uses the Server Side Public License (SSPL)."
  • Server Side Public License struggles to gain open-source support
    MongoDB first announced the release of the new software license in October as a way to protect itself and other open-source projects like it from being taken advantage of by larger companies for monetary gain. At the time, MongoDB co-founder and CTO Eliot Horowitz explained: “This should be a time of incredible opportunity for open source. The revenue generated by a service can be a great source of funding for open-source projects, far greater than what has historically been available. The reality, however, is that once an open-source project becomes interesting, it is too easy for large cloud vendors to capture most of the value while contributing little or nothing back to the community.” Other open-source businesses have developed their own licenses or adopted others in recent months, citing the same issues. However, the problem with these new licenses is that if they are not approved by the Open Source Initiative (OSI), an organization created to promote and protect the open-source ecosystem, the software behind the license is technically not considered open source, and it will have a hard time getting acceptance from members in the community.
  • Open source has a problem with monetization, not AWS
  • Why you should take notice of the open source in enterprise suckers conundrum
    In the MongoDB case, AWS is widely regarded as responding to a licensing change MongoDB made in October 2018 that has caused something of a stir among the open source cognoscenti.
  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-03
    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

How to Integrate Dropbox in Ubuntu Using Nautilus File Manager

This beginners guide will help you to install and integrate Dropbox in Ubuntu’s Nautilus file manager. Dropbox is a popular file hosting service provides users cloud storage and access to your files from any device. Dropbox provides free account upto a certain storage limit and also provides subscription based accounts. Dropbox provides native desktop apps for Linux systems. Read more

Security: Cincoze Back Doors (ME), Windows 10 Mobile Killed (No More Patches), New FUD About 'Linux Servers'

  • Industrial Apollo Lake mini-PC features dual GbE with PoE
    Cincoze announced a compact, rugged “DA-1100” embedded PC with an Apollo Lake SoC, triple display support, dual GbE ports with PoE, 4x USB 3.0 ports, SATA, and expansion via mini-PCIe and homegrown add-on modules. Cincoze has updated its “entry level” Intel Bay Trail based DA-1000 industrial mini-PC, which is sold under the same name in the U.S. by Logic Supply. The new Apollo Lake based DA-1100, which is now referred to as an edge computer is not only a bit faster, but offers a few key enhancements, including PoE and triple displays. No pricing was listed by Taiwan-based Cincoze, but Logic Supply sold the earlier DA-1000 at $569 and up including a 32GB SATA SSD. It’s possible the new model will end up at Logic Supply as well.
  • Microsoft is Ending Windows 10 Mobile Support on December 10th, 2019
    After the end of support, Windows Phones will continue to work, but some features will eventually shut down. Automatic and manual backups for settings and apps will cease after March 10, 2020. And services like photo upload and device restore will stop December 2020.
  • Linux-Targeting Cryptojacking Malware Disables Cloud-Based Security Measures: Report [Ed: They make it sound like GNU/Linux is the problem; but it relies on already-compromised GNU/Linux systems]
    A new cryptojacking malware has the ability to disable cloud-based security measures to avoid detection on Linux servers, research by information security company Palo Alto Networks Jan. 17 reveals. The malware in question mines Monero (XMR) and is reportedly a modified version of one used by the so-called “Rocke” group, originally discovered by cybersecurity firm Talos in August last year. According to the research, one of the first things that the malware does is check for other cryptocurrency mining processes and add firewall rules to block any other cryptojacking malware.