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Tuesday, 25 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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NoNux Screenshots all over the place

Filed under
Linux

The Dutch developers of Nonux have embarked upon yet another release. Enhanced in this v2.2 release is the Linux kernel 2.6.14.5, GNOME 2.12.2, OpenOffice 2.0.1, and vast improvements to the hard disk installer. There are plenty of screenshots around to demonstrate some of this.

Microsoft licences too expensive, say UK schools

Filed under
OSS

"A lot of schools are looking at open source -- budgets come into play here. Microsoft licensing takes a big chunk out of schools budgets. The biggest issue is cost, basically."

People Behind KDE: Görkem Çetin

Filed under
KDE

Tonight's interview on People Behind KDE is with one of the heros of KDE localisation. For KDE 4 he plans to get 100% Turkish support.

Apache Tomcat Performs Better On Linux

Filed under
Software

Web Performance, has released two articles that debate the performance of the open source application server, Tomcat on Linux and Windows and maintains that Linux was able to handle 32% more users than Windows

Google going after Microsoft and Apple

Filed under
Misc

I'm not one of those who believes Google has a secret plan for world domination.

But I do see Google moving rapidly, if somewhat haphazardly, beyond its core business of Internet search in ways that put the Mountain View company on a collision course with other tech giants -- specifically Apple and Microsoft.

Also: Google amazes - but for how long?

Book Review : Linux Quick Fix Notebook

Filed under
Reviews

I am always on the lookout for good books on Linux which covers system and network administration topics. So when I came across one of the Bruce Perens' Open Source Series books on Linux called "Linux Quick Fix Notebook" authored by Peter Harrison, I gave it a shot.

A glimpse at SimplyMEPIS_3.4-3.rc1

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

SimplyMEPIS 3.4-3rc1 was offered for consumption recently and it was asked if it was soup yet? It'd been quite a few years since I had looked at Mepis, and I thought this was the perfect time to get reacquainted. The announcement used such enticements as a 2.6.15 kernel, Firefox 1.5, and udev. We downloaded and burnt said distro in record time and was off to the races with great hast. What did we find?

Matt Asay: Red Hat - The mother of all open source business models

Filed under
Linux

The biggest problem in open source today is that few now how to monetize it. There are great developers out there who will write free (as in freedom and price) software regardless of a profit motive, but they are the minority. We need more developers making more money to fuel...more development. But how?

Realm Systems BlackDog

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

The world's smallest Linux server has entered our labs, and consisting of the package are a mini biometric reader, MMC slot, and USB interface. Powering the system is a 400MHz PowerPC processor, 64MB of RAM, and 256/512MB of flash memory while running up the software side of things is Debian Linux with the 2.6.10 kernel. The server chewing its way into our labs is the BlackDog, which was developed by Realm Systems.

Stratus Using Linux: the Missed Story

Filed under
Linux

Many may have just glossed over a recent E-Week article regarding the use of Linux by a company named Stratus. However, there is something very encouraging and substantive behind this story that should not be missed.

Osnabrueck IV Meeting Brings "Akonadi" PIM Data Storage Service

Filed under
KDE

For the fourth consecutive year a group of KDE PIM developers followed the gracious invitation of Intevation GmbH to meet at their headquarters in Osnabrück, Germany on the first weekend in January. As in the past years, the face-time proved very productive especially since everyone felt that with KDE 4 the time for more fundamental changes has come.

Happy birthday Drupal

Filed under
Drupal

Today, five years ago, Drupal 1.0.0 was released! The following snippet is taken directly from the original announcement:

How to Enable Shell Commands in gedit

Filed under
HowTos

You've probably heard that gedit is one of the editors in which you're able to run shell commands and have their output visible in the editor. It's just you don't know how to do it.

Open Source Roundup: Was 2005 a watershed year for open source?

Filed under
OSS

The end of one year and the beginning of another brought with it the predictable mix of reflection and prognostication that characterises the annual transition. This last week also brought with it some interesting commentary. Business Week described 2005 as "a watershed for open source", this despite a series of highly critical articles which appeared in the magazine over the course of the year.

How To Set Up Database Replication In MySQL

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial describes how to set up database replication in MySQL. MySQL replication allows you to have an exact copy of a database from a master server on another server (slave), and all updates to the database on the master server are immediately replicated to the database on the slave server so that both databases are in sync.

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Descent 2 OpenGL Linux Port

Filed under
Gaming

D2X-XL is a opensource OpenGL port for Descent 2. D2X-XL is based on D2X 0.2.6 and they fixed all the bugs in D2X 0.2.6!

GNU/Linux: An Amazing Story

Filed under
Linux

Regardless of the critics, even in spite of them, the Linux Story remains one of the greatest in recorded history. You have protagonists and antagonoists, drama, plots and subplots and we have only made it through part of Act II. So much more remains for others to tell.

Perhaps, the heroics of this story makes Linux so easy to embrace.

Running Commercial Linux Software on FreeBSD

Filed under
HowTos

One of the more intriguing capabilities of the BSD operating systems is their ability to run binaries for other Unix-like operating systems. I recently found myself requiring the commercial PGP Command Line for a project. Rather than install a Linux box just for this one piece of software, I jumped through some hoops and made it work perfectly on one of my existing FreeBSD systems.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Privacy, R.I.P., and Consent Management at Mozfest 2018

  • Firefox collects data on you through hidden add-ons

    Mozilla, the organisation that produces the Firefox browser and makes a loud noise about its open source credentials, is quietly collecting telemetry data on its users by the use of hidden add-ons, even though publicly visible telemetry controls are not selected.

  • R.I.P., Charles W. Moore, a fine man who liked fine Macs
    A farewell and au revoir to a great gentleman in making the most of your old Mac, Charles W. Moore, who passed away at his home in rural Canada on September 16 after a long illness. Mr Moore was an early fan of TenFourFox, even back in the old bad Firefox 4 beta days, and he really made his famous Pismo PowerBook G3 systems work hard for it.
  • Consent management at Mozfest 2018
    Good news. It looks like we're having a consent management mini-conference as part of Mozfest next month. (I'm one of the organizers for the Global Consent Manager session, and plan to attend the others.)

Android Leftovers

LibreOffice: A history of document freedom

My reminiscing led me to reach out to the Document Foundation, which governs LibreOffice, to learn more about the history of this open source productivity software. The Document Foundation's team told me that "StarWriter, the ancestor of the LibreOffice suite, was developed as proprietary software by Marco Börries, a German student, to write his high school final thesis." He formed a company called Star Division to develop the software. In 1999, Sun Microsystems bought Star Division for $73.5 million, changed the software's name to OpenOffice.org, and released the code as open source. Anyone could download the office suite at no charge for personal use. The Document Foundation told me, "For almost 10 years, the software was developed under Sun stewardship, from version 1.0 to version 3.2. It started with a dual license—LGPL and the proprietary SISSL (Sun Industry Standard Software License)—but it evolved to pure LGPL from version 2.0." Read more

Learn the 37 most frequently used shortcuts in GIMP

GIMP is a fantastic artist's tool for editing digital images, especially with the bevy of impressive features in the recent release of version 2.10. Of course, like all creative applications, you can get working more quickly if you can make yourself familiar with the various keyboard shortcuts and hotkeys available. GIMP, of course, gives you the ability to customize these shortcuts to match what you're personally comfortable with. However, the default shortcuts that GIMP ships with are impressive and generally easy to get used to. This cheat sheet is not an exhaustive list of all of the defaults GIMP has available. Instead, it covers the most frequently used shortcuts so you can get to work as fast as possible. Plus, there should be a few in here that make you aware of a few features that maybe you weren't aware of. Read more