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Friday, 22 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu Rescued My Laptop

Filed under
Ubuntu

A few weeks ago I started seeing the “Blue Screen of Death” on my Sony Vaio PCG-K35 laptop every 10 minutes or so, making the computer nothing more than an overpriced 7 lb. brick. I pulled it out last week and was unable to find the activation keys to Windows XP Pro and Microsoft Office that came with the laptop from the OEM. This weekend I installed the Ubuntu Linux 6.10.

France's Alcatel sues Microsoft for alleged patent infringement

Filed under
Microsoft

French telecommunications gear maker Alcatel SA said Tuesday it has sued Microsoft Corp. in a U.S. federal court for patent infringement.

Open Country Debuts OCM™ Webmin Plus

Filed under
OS

Open Country, a next-generation systems management software company, today announced the debut of OCM™ Webmin Plus, an enhanced release of the popular Webmin open source IT system administration tool. OCM Webmin Plus, developed in partnership with Webmin creator Jamie Cameron, is the first open source product from Open Country, providing a new, low-cost way to easily manage Linux computing environments.

Sometimes Linux Impresses Me

Filed under
Linux

I have been using Unix-like systems for 25 years and Linux for half of that. So I guess I have a bit of Linux-specific experience. Yesterday I actually played with Linux a bit. That is, like a casual user might. And my experience was probably like what a casual user would have. You see, I had just build a speaker cabinet and tossed a couple of speakers in it. The PA amplifier was what was going to drive them but I needed an audio source other than my niece screaming into a microphone.

Highlighting strings in text output with histring

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HowTos

histring simply highlights strings using ANSI terminal escape codes. It is extremely small and lighting fast. I almost use it everywhere in my script where I need a quick peek into large output. Moreover, you almost don't need to learn it, as its syntax is almost identical to grep.

KDE e.V. Quarterly Report

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KDE

The KDE e.V. Quarterly Report is now available for July to September 2006. Topics covered include the outcomes from the 2006 membership meeting, the status of the Technical Working Group's improved charter, the new press channel from the Marketing Working Group and for the first time a report from the Sysadmin Team. All long term KDE contributors are welcome to join KDE e.V.

Linux-Vserver on Debian Testing (Etch), the easy way

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HowTos

What is Linux-Vserver, you ask? It's simple. Basically, Linux-Vserver is an open-source system used to separate a single physical server into multiple virtual servers. In this tutorial, I'll show you how to install Linux-Vserver on Debian Testing (Etch), the easy way.

Linux as a Media Centre

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Desktop 'revolution' that many of us have been hoping and lobbying for may not come about the way we expected, but we are an adaptable crowd and this is the point of my article. Adaptability. Without a strong enough reason to change to Linux people aren't. Enter Mythtv.

The deal that could kill open source

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

There will be a special meeting conducted by Novell on the #openSUSE-project Freenode IRC channel this Thursday at 17:00 GMT, to discuss the Microsoft-Novell deal. I'd certainly be tuning in.

How to set up and configure DocMGR

Filed under
HowTos

Document management systems do more than just store and retrieve files -- they also provide versioning, security, indexing, and metadata capabilities. DocMGR is a GPL-licensed Web-based document management system that supports LDAP directory service integration so that users on the network can authenticate against LDAP directly.

Reviewing a Microsoft anti-Linux case study

Filed under
Linux

As most people know Microsoft has an anti-Linux program called "Get the Facts" featuring case studies arguing the Windows case. When one of those, wearing the title: London Stock Exchange chooses windows over Linux for reliability, arrived in my email last week, I was sufficiently intrigued by the relative reliability claim to read the thing.

Monitor and restart Apache or lighttpd webserver when daemon is killed

Filed under
HowTos

When you cannot monitor your server for service availability, it is better to take help of automated monitor and restart utility. Last 4 days I was away from my server as I was enjoying my vacation. During this time due to load my lighttpd webserver died but it was restarted automatically within 2 minutes.

Install Flash Player 9 Update in Ubuntu

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HowTos

Adobe Flash Player is the standard for delivering high-impact, rich Web content. Designs, animation, and application user interfaces are deployed immediately across all browsers and platforms, attracting and engaging users with a rich Web experience.

Fund Established for Children of Nina Reiser

Filed under
Reiser

A friend of Nina Reiser, an Oakland woman police believe was murdered, has helped set up an education fund for her two young children. Rory and Nio are living with Nina's mother, Irina Sharanova.

For love or money?

Filed under
OSS

There are really two bazaars that fire the boilers for free software: one dominated by talented amateurs who create for love; the other, by professionals who create for money. This creates a curious bi-modal nature to the free software/open source community.

Sony PlayStation 3: the Ars Technica review

Filed under
Gaming

There it is, sitting in my entertainment center: the PlayStation 3. Getting my PS3 was surprisingly easy—no long preorder line—and when the system was released I arrived at 8:00am and picked it up. Simple. I wasn't shot at and there wasn't a lot of fuss. It sounds like I was one of the lucky ones.

SCALE Readies 'Non-Commercial' Open Source Conference

Filed under
OSS

Despite the proliferation of LinuxWorld and other commercial open source shows, several regional Linux organizations continue to hold their own conferences and expos. Right now, for example, a group of open sourcers in California is readying SCALE (Southern California Linux Expo) 5x, an event slated to take place in Los Angeles on February 9 to 11 of next year.

Red Hat Doesn't Want Mono

Filed under
Linux

There are a lot of great new programs and innovations expected in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. The Novell-led Mono project isn't one of them.

Novell Speaks Updated - Microsoft has now responded

Filed under
SUSE

Microsoft and Novell have agreed to disagree on whether certain open source offerings infringe Microsoft patents and whether certain Microsoft offerings infringe Novell patents.... We at Microsoft respect Novell's point of view on the patent issue, even while we respectfully take a different view.

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More in Tux Machines

12 open source tools for natural language processing

Natural language processing (NLP), the technology that powers all the chatbots, voice assistants, predictive text, and other speech/text applications that permeate our lives, has evolved significantly in the last few years. There are a wide variety of open source NLP tools out there, so I decided to survey the landscape to help you plan your next voice- or text-based application. For this review, I focused on tools that use languages I'm familiar with, even though I'm not familiar with all the tools. (I didn't find a great selection of tools in the languages I'm not familiar with anyway.) That said, I excluded tools in three languages I am familiar with, for various reasons. The most obvious language I didn't include might be R, but most of the libraries I found hadn't been updated in over a year. That doesn't always mean they aren't being maintained well, but I think they should be getting updates more often to compete with other tools in the same space. I also chose languages and tools that are most likely to be used in production scenarios (rather than academia and research), and I have mostly used R as a research and discovery tool. Read more

Devices: Indigo Igloo, Raspberry Pi Projects and Ibase

  • AR-controlled robot could help people with motor disabilities with daily tasks
    Researchers employed the PR2 robot running Ubuntu 14.04 and an open-source Robot Operating System called Indigo Igloo for the study. The team made adjustments to the robot including padding metal grippers and adding “fabric-based tactile sensing” in certain areas.
  • 5 IoT Projects You Can Do Yourself on a Raspberry Pi
    Are you new to the Internet of Things and wonder what IoT devices can do for you? Or do you just have a spare Raspberry Pi hanging around and are wondering what you can do with it? Either way, there are plenty of ways to put that cheap little board to work. Some of these projects are easy while others are much more involved. Some you can tackle in a day while others will take a while. No matter what, you’re bound to at least get some ideas looking at this list.
  • Retail-oriented 21.5-inch panel PCs run on Kaby Lake and Bay Trail
    Ibase’s 21.5-inch “UPC-7210” and “UPC-6210” panel PCs run Linux or Windows on 7th Gen Kaby Lake-U and Bay Trail CPUs, respectively. Highlights include 64GB SSDs, mini-PCIe, mSATA, and IP65 protection.

NexDock 2 Turns Your Android Phone or Raspberry Pi into a Laptop

Ever wished your Android smartphone or Raspberry Pi was a laptop? Well, with the NexDock 2 project, now live on Kickstarter, it can be! Both the name and the conceit should be familiar to long-time gadget fans. The original NexDock was a 14.1-inch laptop shell with no computer inside. It successfully crowdfunded back in 2016. The OG device made its way in to the hands of thousands of backers. While competent enough, some of-the-time reviews were tepid about the dock’s build quality. After a brief stint fawning over Intel’s innovative (now scrapped) Compute Cards, the team behind the portable device is back with an updated, refined and hugely improved model. Read more

Graphics: Libinput 1.13 RC2, NVIDIA and AMD

  • libinput 1.12.902
    The second RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    This is the last RC, expect the final within the next few days unless
    someone finds a particulaly egregious bug.
    
    One user-visible change: multitap (doubletap or more) now resets the timer
    on release as well. This should improve tripletap detection as well as any
    tripletap-and-drag and similar gestures.
    
    valgrind is no longer a required dependency to build with tests. It was only
    used in a specific test run anyway (meson test --setup=valgrind) and not
    part of the regular build.
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below.
    
    Benjamin Poirier (1):
          evdev: Rename button up and down states to mirror each other
    
    Feldwor (1):
          Set TouchPad Pressure Range for Toshiba L855
    
    Paolo Giangrandi (1):
          touchpad: multitap state transitions use the same timing used for taps
    
    Peter Hutterer (3):
          tools: flake8 fixes, typo fixes and missing exception handling
          meson.build: make valgrind optional
          libinput 1.12.902
  • Libinput 1.13 RC2 Better Detects Triple Taps
    Peter Hutterer of Red Hat announced the release of libinput 1.13 Release Candidate 2 on Thursday as the newest test release for this input handling library used by both X.Org and Wayland Linux systems. Libinput 1.13 will be released in the days ahead as the latest six month update to this input library. But with the time that has passed, it's not all that exciting of a release as the Logitech high resolution scrolling support as well as Dell Totem input device support for the company's Canvas display was delayed to the next release cycle. But libinput 1.13 is bringing touch arbitration improvements for tablets, various new quirks, and other fixes and usability enhancements.
  • Open-Source NVIDIA PhysX 4.1 Released
    Software releases are aplenty for GDC week and NVIDIA's latest release is their newest post-4.0 PhysX SDK. NVIDIA released the open-source PhysX 4.0 SDK just before Christmas as part of the company re-approaching open-source for this widely used physics library. Now the latest available is PhysX 4.1 and the open-source code drop is out in tandem.
  • AMD have launched an update to their open source Radeon GPU Analyzer, better Vulkan support
    AMD are showing off a little here, with an update to the Radeon GPU Analyzer open source project and it sounds great.