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Tuesday, 25 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Will a shot of Android be enough to save BlackBerry? Rianne Schestowitz 20/11/2013 - 3:25am
Story Docker: An open source startup you need to know about Rianne Schestowitz 20/11/2013 - 3:19am
Story Ubuntu Linux server with ARM processor rolled out by Boston Limited Rianne Schestowitz 20/11/2013 - 3:04am
Story In support of open source launchers sb56637 19/11/2013 - 11:53pm
Blog entry Windows 8.1 "The Worst Ever" gfranken 19/11/2013 - 10:58pm
Story New Linux Hypervisor Announced: Jailhouse Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 10:21pm
Story AMD Radeon R9 290 On Linux Rianne Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 10:11pm
Story Samsung defies critics, ships 800,000 Galaxy Gear smartwatches in two months Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 10:11pm
Story Viber updates desktop app, brings support for stickers; launches Linux client Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 7:46pm
Story Looking For A Linux Laptop? Here's Help Roy Schestowitz 19/11/2013 - 7:40pm

Exploring natural media graphics with Krita

Filed under
KDE

Traditionally, graphics applications have been divided into raster image and vector image editors, based on the primitives that each category uses. By that logic, the open source world needs only one of each, or it gets accused of wasting "resources" through duplication. But there's another way to look at graphics applications -- by usage. The painting program Krita takes a different approach to working with pixels, which can lead to a very different raster imaging experience.

Linux builder eyes Apple .Mac site

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The makers of Ubuntu Linux are planning to develop an equivalent to Apple's .Mac service.

UK school showcases Linux suite

Filed under
Linux

Head teachers from across the country are visiting a school in Essex to see its IT infrastructure, which includes a fully open source computer suite that was built for under £1,000

Xen Virtualization and Linux Clustering, Part 2

Filed under
HowTos

We ended last time after configuring our first unprivileged Xen domain. In this article, we complete our cluster and then test it using an open-source parallel ray tracer. The first thing we need to do is create additional slave nodes to be used with the cluster. So, let's get down to business.

Print a large banner on your terminal

Filed under
HowTos

I still remember those days clearly when I was taking a short term course in Unix. The Unix flavour being SCO Unix ver 5.0. The first command we were introduced to in Unix by the instructor was the 'banner' command.

GPL 3 goodness

Filed under
OSS

I don't pretend to be a lawyer, but I do know a bit about open-source licensing and I, for one, am greeting the arrival of the first public draft of the GPL Version 3 with a great sigh of relief. As I read the new license, here are the highlights.

Also: Stallman unbending on software patents

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Open-Xchange Hires Open Source Expert

Filed under
OS

Open-Xchange, Inc. today announced it has hired former IDC System Software Vice President Daniel M. Kusnetzky as executive vice president, Marketing Strategy, responsible for corporate and marketing strategy worldwide effective February 1.

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Firefox 'passes 20 percent market share' in Europe

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Firefox has achieved an market share of over 20 percent in Europe, according to the latest figures released by French Web metrics firm XiTi.

Companies push Linux partitioning effort

Filed under
Linux

A push is under way to endow Linux with a virtual partitioning technology used by rival operating systems to make servers more efficient.

FSF Explains GPL 3.0 Vision

Filed under
OSS

Any program could be destroyed or crippled by a software patent belonging to someone who has no other connection to the program, they said, adding that most countries have followed the direction of the United States in allowing software to be patented to at least some degree, and, by the end of the decade, commentators were criticizing the GPL for doing too little to combat patents.

Open Source Saves Credit Company Thousands in Licence Costs

Filed under
OSS

I was apprehensive about Linux and open source in general as I had always assumed that it was something only techies used and was not very user friendly. "Since buying the Linux server I have found it easier to use than our old Windows NT server. Things like adding new users and setting administration rights are far simpler, e-mail handling and backup solutions are also much improved.

GhostWriter: A Linux distro for writers

Filed under
Linux

One of the things that I love about Linux is that it has tools for everyone, including writers. Linux distributions come with word processors, text editors, spell checkers, typesetting, and publishing tools galore. Normally, you're using these tools with a standard desktop distribution in an environment like KDE or GNOME. Billy-Bob Ming, however, has taken a different tack and rolled his own Linux distro specifically aimed at writers.

CD burning with a 2.6 kernel (IDE)

Filed under
HowTos

Under the 2.4 series kernel - to be able to use an IDE CD burner we were forced to use SCSI emulation (via the kernel module ide-scsi). Under the 2.6 series kernel - this is deprecated - we now use ide-cd.

Tux Power! - a compilation of music made with Linux

Filed under
Linux

Linuxaudio.org has released its first compilation CD of music by artists
using libre software - Tux Power! Every single part of the CD was made
on Linux, including all the music.

Google censors South African search engine

Filed under
Web

South Africa's newest search engine, Jonga, disappeared from Google's index last week without a trace. Jonga's owner, Alistair Carruthers, is wondering why.

Novell pumps $20M into Open Invention Network

Filed under
Misc

Novell Inc. has invested $20 million in a New York startup that is acquiring patents covering software developed under open-source principles.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Privacy, R.I.P., and Consent Management at Mozfest 2018

  • Firefox collects data on you through hidden add-ons

    Mozilla, the organisation that produces the Firefox browser and makes a loud noise about its open source credentials, is quietly collecting telemetry data on its users by the use of hidden add-ons, even though publicly visible telemetry controls are not selected.

  • R.I.P., Charles W. Moore, a fine man who liked fine Macs
    A farewell and au revoir to a great gentleman in making the most of your old Mac, Charles W. Moore, who passed away at his home in rural Canada on September 16 after a long illness. Mr Moore was an early fan of TenFourFox, even back in the old bad Firefox 4 beta days, and he really made his famous Pismo PowerBook G3 systems work hard for it.
  • Consent management at Mozfest 2018
    Good news. It looks like we're having a consent management mini-conference as part of Mozfest next month. (I'm one of the organizers for the Global Consent Manager session, and plan to attend the others.)

Android Leftovers

LibreOffice: A history of document freedom

My reminiscing led me to reach out to the Document Foundation, which governs LibreOffice, to learn more about the history of this open source productivity software. The Document Foundation's team told me that "StarWriter, the ancestor of the LibreOffice suite, was developed as proprietary software by Marco Börries, a German student, to write his high school final thesis." He formed a company called Star Division to develop the software. In 1999, Sun Microsystems bought Star Division for $73.5 million, changed the software's name to OpenOffice.org, and released the code as open source. Anyone could download the office suite at no charge for personal use. The Document Foundation told me, "For almost 10 years, the software was developed under Sun stewardship, from version 1.0 to version 3.2. It started with a dual license—LGPL and the proprietary SISSL (Sun Industry Standard Software License)—but it evolved to pure LGPL from version 2.0." Read more

Learn the 37 most frequently used shortcuts in GIMP

GIMP is a fantastic artist's tool for editing digital images, especially with the bevy of impressive features in the recent release of version 2.10. Of course, like all creative applications, you can get working more quickly if you can make yourself familiar with the various keyboard shortcuts and hotkeys available. GIMP, of course, gives you the ability to customize these shortcuts to match what you're personally comfortable with. However, the default shortcuts that GIMP ships with are impressive and generally easy to get used to. This cheat sheet is not an exhaustive list of all of the defaults GIMP has available. Instead, it covers the most frequently used shortcuts so you can get to work as fast as possible. Plus, there should be a few in here that make you aware of a few features that maybe you weren't aware of. Read more