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Friday, 14 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Customizing Dynebolic version 2

Filed under
HowTos

Dynebolic is a live CD distro packed with tools for working with sound and video files. Dynebolic uses the Squashfs filesystem to fit a lot of applications into a small space, along with a speed-tweaked kernel and the tools to perform well on low-end equipment. The upcoming Dyne:II release also lets you add and remove tools to create your own custom version of the distro. Here's how.

University moves toward open source despite some resistance

Filed under
OSS

For the past few years Scott, a systems administrator at the University of Southern Florida (USF) in Tampa, has been battling an institutional mindset to get Windows out and Linux in as part of his plan to save money on licensing costs, lost time through server consolidation and maybe even his own sanity.

PS3 to be launched on 11 November in Japan, a week later in the U.S.

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Gaming

Sony Corporation's video game console PlayStation3 will be in the market in November. Sony officials said the PS3 will be introduced in the Japanese markets on 11 November and in the U.S. and European markets a week later.

interview: Red Hat chief executive Matthew Szulik

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Red Hat held its second annual Red Hat Summit in Nashville this week. At the event, vnunet.com sat down with the company's chief executive, Matthew Szulik, to talk about the firm's latest initiatives and future directions.

Also: 'No hope' for quick resolution of US patent mess and other related links.

Intel donates Swing code to Apache's open source Java

Filed under
OSS

SOFTWARE COMPANY, Intel, announced, via its "Middleware Division" the contribution of AWT and Java2D packages, along with a Swing package to the Apache "Project Harmony."

Open Source Graphics Take on Adobe, Microsoft

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OSS

The Open Source desktop app sector is gaining another player, as the Xara Project speeds towards a 1.0 release. The Xara Xtreme project is focused on building an Open Source version of a commercial-standard vector graphics. The team just released its Xara LX 0.5 for Linux, and is available under the GNU Public License.

June 2006 of TUX, Issue 14

Filed under
Linux

The June 2006 issue of TUX is now available to download.

This issue features:

*From the Editor: Linspire Embraces the Open Source Community with a Proprietary Solution
*Home Plate: Creating Web Pages with Nvu
*TUX Explains: Konquer Your File Management with KIO

Novell looks to Linux for a lifeline

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SUSE

It's official: All mentions of Novell must now, once again, be preceded by the adjective "beleaguered."

The Talk is All Ubuntu Today

Filed under
Ubuntu

Stories and reviews of Ubuntu 6.06 have sprung up all over the net today. From howtos to reviews, the talk is all Ubuntu today.

Flaw Discovered In Snort Intrusion Prevention Technology

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Security

A recently discovered security issue in Snort, the open source intrusion prevention and detection technology used in government agencies and many large corporations, could allow attackers to bypass security on compromised machines.

n/a

How I mix Debian testing, unstable and experimental

Filed under
HowTos

While Debian 'testing' is rather stable, it's not a release per se, but a living version of Debian. Therefore, when a package migrates from 'unstable' to 'testing', nobody could really guarantee you will be able to install it on your own Debian testing machine with all the dependencies met! That's why you will occasionally have to met dependencies from 'unstable'.

Tax authorities in Lower Saxony switch to Linux

Filed under
SUSE

The State of Lower Saxony has begun switching the PCs its tax authorities use from Solaris x86 to Linux. According to a press release, 12,000 computers are affected.

End of the Go Open Source campaign

Filed under
OSS

The Go Open Source campaign, an open source awareness campaign which launched in May 2004, has completed its two year run and officially concluded at the end of May 2006. The campaign was launched by Mark Shuttleworth on behalf of Canonical, the CSIR's Meraka Institute, HP, and The Shuttleworth Foundation.

OpenBook: MIT $100 laptop and UMPC get "open" competition

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News

A competitor to MIT $100 laptop, Intel's $400, UMPC or the Tablet PC? With target price of under $500, the OpenBook Project was born two weeks ago - owing not much less then some of its main rivals - a common entrepreneurial idea. The project's aim is to deliver an universal wireless-ready personal device for education or home use around the globe.

Ubuntu 6.06 LTS Final Look

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu
-s

Ubuntu 6.06 LTS starting hitting the mirrors yesterday, May 31, and was officially announced in the wee hours of this morning, June 1. Considering the bad luck tuxmachines had with the release candidate's hard drive install, we felt it was only fair to give Ubuntu another chance. We downloaded the desktop version, checked the md5sum, burnt our cd and booted. This is what happened this time.

RHEL 5 to have new version numbering system

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat today announced a new version numbering scheme for the upcoming version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Review: CCux Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

CCux Linux is a performance-oriented distribution whose main idea is to remove everything that is not i686-related, such as old compatibility packages, and to have everything from the kernel up compiled in the i686 flavor. Last month's release of CCux version 0.9.8 is also an up-to-date distro, having kernel 2.6.16, KDE 3.5.2, and Firefox 1.5.0.2. I found it to be a damn good distro.

Prepping Ubuntu for Everyday Use

Filed under
HowTos

For those who have been waiting for the Linux desktop revolution, well, I'm pleased to tell you it's here and knocking on your door. It's called Ubuntu 6.06 LTS.

Below are over 25 tips that will let you tweak and personalize the latest Ubuntu release so that it's perfect. Think of it as polishing the diamond.

Linux Timeline

Filed under
Linux

Linux Journal celebrated the publication of its 100th issue in 2002 with the release of the Linux Timeline. It's now 2006, Linux itself turns 15 this year and Linux Journal, a little older, grayer and wiser, is soon to release it's 150th issue. In celebration and in honor of an amazing community's history we're compiling the significant events of 2002 - 2006.

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More in Tux Machines

Games: Metropolisim, Monster Prom, Kingdom Two Crowns and Lots More

  • Metropolisim aims to be the deepest city-building simulation experience ever, will have Linux support
    Metropolisim from developer Halfway Decent Games is releasing next year, with a pretty bold aim to be the deepest city-building simulation experience ever.
  • Monster Prom, the dating sim that won me over is now available on GOG
    Visual novels and dating sims aren't something I'm usually into, however Monster Prom is actually funny and worth playing and it's now available on GOG. I know we have a number of GOG fans here, so hopefully this will be interesting for you. As always, we try to treat all stores equally with release info.
  • Kingdom Two Crowns will be coming to Linux after all with the Quality of Life update
    Kingdom Two Crowns, the third in the Kingdom series released recently for Windows and Mac. It looked like we weren't getting it, but it's now confirmed to be coming. In their new roadmap post on Reddit and Steam, under the "QoL #01 Update" (Quality of Life Update) they noted that they will add "Add SteamOS (Linux) Support". This update is due out sometime early next year. This is really nice news, it's good to know they didn't give up on supporting Linux after all.
  • Steam Link for the Raspberry Pi is now officially available
    After a rather short beta period, the Steam Link application for the Raspberry Pi is now officially out.
  • Valve in it for the 'long haul' with Artifact, first update out and a progression system due soon
    Artifact, the big new card game from Valve isn't doing so well but Valve won't be giving up any time soon. The first major update is out, with a progression system due soon. At release, it had around sixty thousand people playing and that very quickly dropped down hard. Harder than I expected, a lot worse than Valve probably thought it would too.
  • Bearded Giant Games open their own store with a 'Linux First Initiative'
    Bearded Giant Games, developer of Ebony Spire Heresy have announced their new online store along with a 'Linux First Initiative'. I know what you're thinking already "not another store", but fear not. For now, it's mainly going to be a place for them to sell their games directly. Speaking about it in a blog post, they mentioned how they hate having to check over multiple forums, channels, emails and so on to stay up to date and they wish "to spend more time giving love to my projects instead of updating 4 different distribution channels, translating pages, writing different press releases and making separate builds"—can't argue against that.
  • The Forgotten Sanctum, the final DLC for Pillars of Eternity II is out along with a patch
    Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire expansions come to a close with the release of The Forgotten Sanctum along with a major update now out.
  • Pre-order Meeple Station for instant beta access, what the developers say is like Rimworld in space
    Meeple Station, the space station building sim that the developers say is like Rimworld in space can now be pre-ordered with instant beta access. While we don't like the idea of pre-orders, getting access to the beta right away is a decent way to do it. Sadly, their Kickstarter campaign actually failed which I didn't notice. Making sure that wasn't the end of it, the developer Vox Games decided to go the Early Access route. They weren't left out in the cold of space though, as they also recently announced that Indie DB will be publishing their game. Under the label of Modularity, this will be the first title published by Indie DB.
  • Heroes of Newerth drops support for Linux and Mac
    Heroes of Newerth, the MOBA originally from S2 Games which is now handled by Frostburn Studios has dropped Linux and Mac support. [...] I'll be honest here, I couldn't care less about it personally. The last time i tried it, it was the single most toxic experience I've ever had in an online game. I've played a lot of online games and even so it was still at a level I had not seen before. I tried to go back to it a few times, never with a happy ending. Still, sad for any remaining Linux (and Mac) fans of the game. Looking over some statistics, it's not popular with viewers either. Around 180 on Twitch compared with nearly 100K for League of Legends and over 50K for Dota 2.
  • Unity 2018.3 With HDR Render Pipeline Preview, Updated PhysX & More
    Unity Tech is ending out the year with their Unity 2018.3 game engine update that brings a number of new features and improvements to its many supported platforms.

Wine 4.0 Release Candidate 2

  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 4.0-rc2 is now available. What's new in this release (see below for details): - Bug fixes only, we are in code freeze.
  • Just when you think you can stop drinking, Wine 4.0 has another release candidate available
    Just before the weekend hits you in the face like a bad hangover when you realise it's Monday already, there's another bottle of Wine ready for you. Of course, we're not talking about the tasty liquid! Put down the glass, it's the other kind of Wine. The one used to run your fancy Windows programs and games on Linux. Doing their usual thing, developer Alexandre Julliard announced that the Wine 4.0 Release Candidate 2 is officially out the door today. While this release is nothing spectacular it is an important one, the more bugs they're able to tick off the list the better the 4.0 release will be for more people to use it.

Android Leftovers

A Look At The Clear Linux Performance Over The Course Of 2018

With the end of the year quickly approaching, it's time for our annual look at how the Linux performance has evolved over the past year from graphics drivers to distributions. This year was a particularly volatile year for Linux performance due to Spectre and Meltdown mitigations, some of which have at least partially recovered thanks to continued optimizations landing in subsequent kernel releases. But on the plus side, new releases of Python, PHP, GCC 8, and other new software releases have helped out the performance. For kicking off our year-end benchmark comparisons, first up is a look at how Intel's performance-optimized Clear Linux distribution evolved this year. For getting a look at the performance, on four different systems (two Xeon boxes, a Core i5, and Core i7 systems), the performance was compared from Clear Linux at the end of 2017 to the current rolling-release state as of this week. Read more