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Friday, 22 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Mark Shuttleworth: Pervasive support (2)

Filed under
Linux

I have this weird relationship with the words “it’s not supported”. Whenever I’m talking to an audience of typical computer users about Linux I’ll hear those words. So why do people say “Linux is not supported”?

Combining OpenOffice.org text documents using master files

Filed under
HowTos

One of the recurring tasks in these inescapable group projects is combining your work for the final presentation. You can choose to copy and paste, or choose Insert > File, to combine the documents. But on a grand scale and with multiple authors continuing to update their content, this can cause problems.

Creating a managed website—Part 1

Filed under
HowTos

Do you manage a website? Maybe you’re looking after the site for a small business. Maybe you’re doing it for a community group. Perhaps it’s your own personal site. You’d like it to be dynamic: to have some fresh news every week and a home page that’s always up to date. Therein lies the problem.

Also: Improving website security

Step-By-Step Configuration of NAT with iptables

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up network-address-translation (NAT) on a Linux system with iptables rules so that the system can act as a gateway and provide internet access to multiple hosts on a local network using a single public IP address. This is achieved by rewriting the source and/or destination addresses of IP packets as they pass through the NAT system.

http://www.howtoforge.com/nat_iptables

A few tips for starting KDE4 development

Filed under
KDE

If you want to start building KDE4, here are a few hints, gathered from the most frequent questions I hear.

A week with SuSE 10

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

A series of events led me to installing a copy of Novell's Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 last week. Given the hype that Novell had made around the distribution I was expecting to be impressed. And I was.

Dirk Dashing 1.02 released

Filed under
Gaming

Today a Dirk Dashing update has been released for Linux, to fix several bugs found by Linux gamers. This include fixed another problem with the game locking up on some distributions, camera movement near the edge of map, and a bug when restarting a level after dying and camera is not positioned correctly.

More Here.

TurboLinux's Wizpy: bootable Linux on a PMP

Filed under
Linux

We've all seen plenty of Linux computers on a stick before, right? But check the TurboLinux Wizpy which brings all that portable Linux PC and USB mass storage goodness wrapped inside a DivX capable MP3 player. The Wizpy features a 1.7-inch OLED display, 4GB of flash memory, an FM radio, and additional support for OGG/WMA/AAC formats. It comes pre-loaded with Turbolinux Fuji and a smattering of apps such as Firefox, Thunderbird, and Skype.

New online class teaches basic Linux for free

Filed under
Linux

LinuxBasic.org, an online community devoted to helping people learn to install and run Linux, has announced its second free Linux class. "An Introduction to Linux Basics" aims to instill a basic understanding about Linux for beginners who want to know more about how the system works, according to the site.

Fedora Core 6: Beauty or Beast?

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

After the usual new-release downloading frenzy died down a bit, I downloaded the 3.3 gigabyte DVD .iso image, stoked the boiler of my test PC, and put Fedora Core 6 through its paces. My mission: to determine if FC6 is suitable for production systems, or if it's better suited as a bleeding-edge testbed.

Ballmer on Patents: Swinging a Saber or a Salami?

Filed under
News

If MS plans to sue for intellectual property related issues, IBM is unlikely to choose an obsequious posture. Today's leaders at big blue don't cower to opposition. Moreover, even when tides turn, they demonstrate some unique strategy of their own.

Fluxbuntu - Installation & Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

Fluxbuntu is a light-weight, standards-compliant, Ubuntu-based Linux distribution featuring the Fluxbox window manager.The project’s primary goal is to develop an operating system that would run on a wide range of mobile devices and computers, both low-end and high-end.

How to bridge networks with OpenVPN

Filed under
HowTos

OpenVPN is an easy-to-use open source VPN software based on SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) that offers cross-platform interoperability. The majority of OpenVPN tutorials I've found describe how users can connect to a corporate network from their laptops over insecure networks, such as the wireless network in a hotel. By contrast, the setup I'm about to describe is better suited for permanently connecting entire networks -- for example, branch offices to the headquarters of a company.

Playing with partitions

Filed under
HowTos

If you ever partition your hard disk you will find that no matter how smart you think you have organized your partitions you will always come to a situation where you have to play around with your partitions. Fortunately with linux and indeed all *nix based systems it is not only easy but often an integral part of the system. I am going to go through a couple of scenarios.

KDE and Gnome Comparison

Filed under
Software

This is not, by any means a comprehensive look at the differences between KDE and Gnome, but it should give new users a small taste of their different strengths and weaknesses and their philosophical approaches to usability.

Fedora Core 6

Filed under
Reviews

Fedora Core is often called a test version of Red Hat, but many believe that it deserves to be recognised as a fully fledged distribution in its own right. Led by a community and sponsored by Red Hat, Fedora is probably one of the most popular GNU/Linux distributions in the world, with users including Wikipedia. It recently reached its sixth release, so let's see what's inside.

Implementing Disk Quotas on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial walks you through implementing disk quotas for both users and groups on Linux, using a virtual filesystem, which is a filesystem created from a disk file. Since quotas work on a per-filesystem basis, this is a way to implement quotas on a sub-section, or even multiple subsections of your drive, without reformatting. This tutorial also covers quotactl, or quota's C interface, by way of an example program that can store disk usage in a SQLite database for monitoring data usage over time.

Create Photo Mosaics with Metapixel

Filed under
HowTos

I've always thought that mosaics were an interesting art form, so when I ran across Metapixel a while back I noted it as an app worth checking out. Metapixel is a single purpose tool, but it does its job very well. In no time you can create an impressive photo mosaic using your existing photos and a couple commands.

Red Fedora Fits Well Enough For Analyst To Give A Boost To Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Robert Stimson of analyst firm W.R. Hambrecht initiated coverage of Red Hat with a bang on Tuesday. Despite facing threats from giant Oracle and the strange alliance between former enemies Microsoft and Novell that obviously targets Red Hat, the Hatters and their stock were labeled as a “buy” with a target stock price of $21.

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More in Tux Machines

12 open source tools for natural language processing

Natural language processing (NLP), the technology that powers all the chatbots, voice assistants, predictive text, and other speech/text applications that permeate our lives, has evolved significantly in the last few years. There are a wide variety of open source NLP tools out there, so I decided to survey the landscape to help you plan your next voice- or text-based application. For this review, I focused on tools that use languages I'm familiar with, even though I'm not familiar with all the tools. (I didn't find a great selection of tools in the languages I'm not familiar with anyway.) That said, I excluded tools in three languages I am familiar with, for various reasons. The most obvious language I didn't include might be R, but most of the libraries I found hadn't been updated in over a year. That doesn't always mean they aren't being maintained well, but I think they should be getting updates more often to compete with other tools in the same space. I also chose languages and tools that are most likely to be used in production scenarios (rather than academia and research), and I have mostly used R as a research and discovery tool. Read more

Devices: Indigo Igloo, Raspberry Pi Projects and Ibase

  • AR-controlled robot could help people with motor disabilities with daily tasks
    Researchers employed the PR2 robot running Ubuntu 14.04 and an open-source Robot Operating System called Indigo Igloo for the study. The team made adjustments to the robot including padding metal grippers and adding “fabric-based tactile sensing” in certain areas.
  • 5 IoT Projects You Can Do Yourself on a Raspberry Pi
    Are you new to the Internet of Things and wonder what IoT devices can do for you? Or do you just have a spare Raspberry Pi hanging around and are wondering what you can do with it? Either way, there are plenty of ways to put that cheap little board to work. Some of these projects are easy while others are much more involved. Some you can tackle in a day while others will take a while. No matter what, you’re bound to at least get some ideas looking at this list.
  • Retail-oriented 21.5-inch panel PCs run on Kaby Lake and Bay Trail
    Ibase’s 21.5-inch “UPC-7210” and “UPC-6210” panel PCs run Linux or Windows on 7th Gen Kaby Lake-U and Bay Trail CPUs, respectively. Highlights include 64GB SSDs, mini-PCIe, mSATA, and IP65 protection.

NexDock 2 Turns Your Android Phone or Raspberry Pi into a Laptop

Ever wished your Android smartphone or Raspberry Pi was a laptop? Well, with the NexDock 2 project, now live on Kickstarter, it can be! Both the name and the conceit should be familiar to long-time gadget fans. The original NexDock was a 14.1-inch laptop shell with no computer inside. It successfully crowdfunded back in 2016. The OG device made its way in to the hands of thousands of backers. While competent enough, some of-the-time reviews were tepid about the dock’s build quality. After a brief stint fawning over Intel’s innovative (now scrapped) Compute Cards, the team behind the portable device is back with an updated, refined and hugely improved model. Read more

Graphics: Libinput 1.13 RC2, NVIDIA and AMD

  • libinput 1.12.902
    The second RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    This is the last RC, expect the final within the next few days unless
    someone finds a particulaly egregious bug.
    
    One user-visible change: multitap (doubletap or more) now resets the timer
    on release as well. This should improve tripletap detection as well as any
    tripletap-and-drag and similar gestures.
    
    valgrind is no longer a required dependency to build with tests. It was only
    used in a specific test run anyway (meson test --setup=valgrind) and not
    part of the regular build.
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below.
    
    Benjamin Poirier (1):
          evdev: Rename button up and down states to mirror each other
    
    Feldwor (1):
          Set TouchPad Pressure Range for Toshiba L855
    
    Paolo Giangrandi (1):
          touchpad: multitap state transitions use the same timing used for taps
    
    Peter Hutterer (3):
          tools: flake8 fixes, typo fixes and missing exception handling
          meson.build: make valgrind optional
          libinput 1.12.902
  • Libinput 1.13 RC2 Better Detects Triple Taps
    Peter Hutterer of Red Hat announced the release of libinput 1.13 Release Candidate 2 on Thursday as the newest test release for this input handling library used by both X.Org and Wayland Linux systems. Libinput 1.13 will be released in the days ahead as the latest six month update to this input library. But with the time that has passed, it's not all that exciting of a release as the Logitech high resolution scrolling support as well as Dell Totem input device support for the company's Canvas display was delayed to the next release cycle. But libinput 1.13 is bringing touch arbitration improvements for tablets, various new quirks, and other fixes and usability enhancements.
  • Open-Source NVIDIA PhysX 4.1 Released
    Software releases are aplenty for GDC week and NVIDIA's latest release is their newest post-4.0 PhysX SDK. NVIDIA released the open-source PhysX 4.0 SDK just before Christmas as part of the company re-approaching open-source for this widely used physics library. Now the latest available is PhysX 4.1 and the open-source code drop is out in tandem.
  • AMD have launched an update to their open source Radeon GPU Analyzer, better Vulkan support
    AMD are showing off a little here, with an update to the Radeon GPU Analyzer open source project and it sounds great.