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About Tux Machines

Friday, 22 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Cisco CVD Documents Hadoop as a Service for Ubuntu OpenStack Roy Schestowitz 16/08/2014 - 12:51am
Story Samsung SmartThings pickup could mean new role for Tizen Rianne Schestowitz 15/08/2014 - 11:27pm
Story Android, iOS gobble up even more global smartphone share Rianne Schestowitz 15/08/2014 - 7:02pm
Story Linux Satisfaction, Beginners' Guide, and Download Managers Rianne Schestowitz 15/08/2014 - 6:56pm
Story GCC 5.0 Doesn't Show Much Difference Yet For AMD's Steamroller Rianne Schestowitz 15/08/2014 - 5:58pm
Story We Tried to Break This New Android Phone and This Is What Happened Rianne Schestowitz 15/08/2014 - 5:34pm
Story PiPhone interview with Dave Hunt Rianne Schestowitz 15/08/2014 - 5:19pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2014 - 4:37pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2014 - 4:37pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 15/08/2014 - 4:37pm

Turning kids on to computing - not

Filed under
Misc

Tis the season to be deluged with ads for all manner of crap for kids, including “educational” computer games. Yeah, right. Wouldn’t you rather give your kids something of value, and that will help them develop real skills? Instead of turning into nearsighted wheezing lardbutted obsessive-compulsive button-pushers?

Three, two, one…Geronimo!, Part 4: The schema of things

Filed under
News

The Web browser marks the end of a line that begins with the database schema. So how do you create a good database schema? You need more than effective tools; you need a plan. Designing databases is part science and part art, so start honing your skills now. Discover some useful tips for designing a database schema that's fast, efficient, and responsive to change.

Novell Marketing in the UK

Filed under
SUSE

Novell is already marketing its Microsoft deal in the UK. A couple of readers have sent me their UK newsletter, and it's a pip. They mention the patent aspect of the deal, by the way, prominently.

The future of X

Filed under
Software

Keith Packard is one of the main X developers and currently works at Intel to improve their graphic drivers for X and to improve X in general. He had a talk at this year’s akademy titled “Multi-Head RandR” and I was eager to get my hands on the slides since I was not able to attend akademy. Today he sent me an e-mail noting that he finally found the time to put the slides of his presentation online.

Behind the scenes at GNOME's Web site revision

Filed under
Web

Like any large organisation, the GNOME Project faces a formidable challenge in maintaining an effective Web site. Trying the balance the demands of promotion, documentation, and community coordination is made all the more difficult when you only have volunteers to do the work. But over the past year the GNOME community has developed and begun to execute a well-defined process to refocus and rejuvenate its much-neglected Web presence.

Review of Slackware 11.0

Filed under
Slack

Slackware is one of the oldest Linux distributions alive today and focuses on stability over cutting edge features. You might not find many flashy GUI tools for Slackware, but don't let that fool you - this is one heck of a distro. Today I'm taking a look at this latest version of Slackware and explore the myth that Slackware isn't for newbies.

Myths And Realities Of Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Continuing advancements in reliability and performance are elevating the role of open source in software development. Both users and developers are eager for the spread of cost-effective open source solutions from today's relatively simple deployments, such as Web services, into core functions such as transaction processing and enterprise databases. But is open source ready for such a transition?

OpenOffice extension rivals SharePoint

Filed under
Software

Most people think that OpenOffice.org is a strong office-suite in its own right. But, when it came to a back-office document collaboration and management engine, like Microsoft SharePoint to enable OpenOffice users to work together, it was a different story.

Photos: Top 10 pieces of Linux kit

Filed under
Linux

From robots to ice cream machines, from Xbox to MP3 players to phones...

Featured Here.

How GPL fits in with the future of antitrust regulation

Filed under
OSS

People are permitted to make and distribute derivative works only if they adhere to the same license terms as the original work. Accordingly, as noted by the court, "the GPL propagates from user to user and revision to revision; neither the original author, nor any creator of a revised or improved version, may charge for the software or allow any successor to charge."

Why open source is ready for the enterprise: beyond free stuff

Filed under
OSS

Open source is certainly hot among the tech community, but if you mention the concept to IT leaders in the enterprise environment, they tend to immediately cringe. The inference being that "free stuff" can't possibly match the quality of products you pay for -- and the "DIY approach" is not manageable or secure enough for large enterprises. This kind of rash write-off plainly misses the mark!

UK MPs criticise government for blocking Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

A group of UK MPs has criticised the government because they say that the Department of Education and Skills (DfES) and Becta policies favours proprietary software vendors (such as Microsoft) in schools and colleges rather than allowing for the adoption of open source software.

Install Microsoft Core,Windows Truetype,Ubuntu Title,Macintosh Fonts in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu uses Defoma,the Debian Font Manager,to centralize and simplify font management across all applications.Defoma, which stands for DEbian FOnt MAnager, provides a framework for automatic font configuration. An application whose configuration of fonts usually requires manual intervention can automate the process through Defoma, by installing a Defoma-configuration script. The script gets called whenever a font is installed and removed, so that the script may update the application configuration.Debian Font Manager — automatic font configuration framework.

Create a Custom Live Linux CD - Leveraging BusyBox and OpenSSH

Filed under
HowTos

These steps will show you how to create a functioning Linux system, with the latest 2.6 kernel compiled from source, and how to integrate the BusyBox utilities including the installation of DHCP. Plus, how to compile in the OpenSSH package.

Controlling disk space with symbolic links

Filed under
HowTos

Let's say you have a system with a few filesystems. One of those systems is getting tight on space, but the other has plenty of room. There are several ways to handle that. You could use a symbolic link.

BasKet makes organization easy

Filed under
Software

BasKet is a multipurpose note-taking application that allows you to collect and organize text, pictures, files, and more. BasKet 0.6.0, released last month, sports a new interface and improved features over previous releases.

WoW Linux Gamers' Ban Lifted

Filed under
Gaming

In a frenzy of bans, Blizzard mistakenly banned a few Linux users who used a legitimate program called 'Cedega' to play WoW. Blizzard Entertainment deeply regrets the error, as we understand that this brief account closure presented you with an inconvenient and highly frustrating experience.

Ubuntu Wins Most User Friendly Linux Distribution Award

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical Ltd today announced it has scooped another two awards for Ubuntu, its leading-edge Linux distribution. At the Linux New Media Awards, on Wednesday 15th November, Ubuntu was awarded 'Most User-Friendly Linux Distribution', and Canonical the 'Best combination of Community and Commerce'.

Tips for new Gentoo users

Filed under
Gentoo

Gentoo is one of the most difficult distributions to learn, though veteran Gentoo users might point out that its friendly community and extensive documentation can help new users. Here are some tips that might make Gentoo easier for anyone who wants to give it a try.

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More in Tux Machines

12 open source tools for natural language processing

Natural language processing (NLP), the technology that powers all the chatbots, voice assistants, predictive text, and other speech/text applications that permeate our lives, has evolved significantly in the last few years. There are a wide variety of open source NLP tools out there, so I decided to survey the landscape to help you plan your next voice- or text-based application. For this review, I focused on tools that use languages I'm familiar with, even though I'm not familiar with all the tools. (I didn't find a great selection of tools in the languages I'm not familiar with anyway.) That said, I excluded tools in three languages I am familiar with, for various reasons. The most obvious language I didn't include might be R, but most of the libraries I found hadn't been updated in over a year. That doesn't always mean they aren't being maintained well, but I think they should be getting updates more often to compete with other tools in the same space. I also chose languages and tools that are most likely to be used in production scenarios (rather than academia and research), and I have mostly used R as a research and discovery tool. Read more

Devices: Indigo Igloo, Raspberry Pi Projects and Ibase

  • AR-controlled robot could help people with motor disabilities with daily tasks
    Researchers employed the PR2 robot running Ubuntu 14.04 and an open-source Robot Operating System called Indigo Igloo for the study. The team made adjustments to the robot including padding metal grippers and adding “fabric-based tactile sensing” in certain areas.
  • 5 IoT Projects You Can Do Yourself on a Raspberry Pi
    Are you new to the Internet of Things and wonder what IoT devices can do for you? Or do you just have a spare Raspberry Pi hanging around and are wondering what you can do with it? Either way, there are plenty of ways to put that cheap little board to work. Some of these projects are easy while others are much more involved. Some you can tackle in a day while others will take a while. No matter what, you’re bound to at least get some ideas looking at this list.
  • Retail-oriented 21.5-inch panel PCs run on Kaby Lake and Bay Trail
    Ibase’s 21.5-inch “UPC-7210” and “UPC-6210” panel PCs run Linux or Windows on 7th Gen Kaby Lake-U and Bay Trail CPUs, respectively. Highlights include 64GB SSDs, mini-PCIe, mSATA, and IP65 protection.

NexDock 2 Turns Your Android Phone or Raspberry Pi into a Laptop

Ever wished your Android smartphone or Raspberry Pi was a laptop? Well, with the NexDock 2 project, now live on Kickstarter, it can be! Both the name and the conceit should be familiar to long-time gadget fans. The original NexDock was a 14.1-inch laptop shell with no computer inside. It successfully crowdfunded back in 2016. The OG device made its way in to the hands of thousands of backers. While competent enough, some of-the-time reviews were tepid about the dock’s build quality. After a brief stint fawning over Intel’s innovative (now scrapped) Compute Cards, the team behind the portable device is back with an updated, refined and hugely improved model. Read more

Graphics: Libinput 1.13 RC2, NVIDIA and AMD

  • libinput 1.12.902
    The second RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    This is the last RC, expect the final within the next few days unless
    someone finds a particulaly egregious bug.
    
    One user-visible change: multitap (doubletap or more) now resets the timer
    on release as well. This should improve tripletap detection as well as any
    tripletap-and-drag and similar gestures.
    
    valgrind is no longer a required dependency to build with tests. It was only
    used in a specific test run anyway (meson test --setup=valgrind) and not
    part of the regular build.
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below.
    
    Benjamin Poirier (1):
          evdev: Rename button up and down states to mirror each other
    
    Feldwor (1):
          Set TouchPad Pressure Range for Toshiba L855
    
    Paolo Giangrandi (1):
          touchpad: multitap state transitions use the same timing used for taps
    
    Peter Hutterer (3):
          tools: flake8 fixes, typo fixes and missing exception handling
          meson.build: make valgrind optional
          libinput 1.12.902
  • Libinput 1.13 RC2 Better Detects Triple Taps
    Peter Hutterer of Red Hat announced the release of libinput 1.13 Release Candidate 2 on Thursday as the newest test release for this input handling library used by both X.Org and Wayland Linux systems. Libinput 1.13 will be released in the days ahead as the latest six month update to this input library. But with the time that has passed, it's not all that exciting of a release as the Logitech high resolution scrolling support as well as Dell Totem input device support for the company's Canvas display was delayed to the next release cycle. But libinput 1.13 is bringing touch arbitration improvements for tablets, various new quirks, and other fixes and usability enhancements.
  • Open-Source NVIDIA PhysX 4.1 Released
    Software releases are aplenty for GDC week and NVIDIA's latest release is their newest post-4.0 PhysX SDK. NVIDIA released the open-source PhysX 4.0 SDK just before Christmas as part of the company re-approaching open-source for this widely used physics library. Now the latest available is PhysX 4.1 and the open-source code drop is out in tandem.
  • AMD have launched an update to their open source Radeon GPU Analyzer, better Vulkan support
    AMD are showing off a little here, with an update to the Radeon GPU Analyzer open source project and it sounds great.