Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Cold War Linux Demo Released

Filed under
Gaming

Cold War is a mixed third-first person shooter similar to Splinter Cell and follows the story of a freelance journalist who finds himself in the midst of an international conspiracy that aims to control the U.S.S.R. Finally a demo is released.

The Yin and Yang of Open Source Commerce, Parts 2 & 3

Filed under
OSS

In this continuing series, we consider key aspects that impact the future of OSS in the business and consumer markets.

There's A New Distro in Town Pardner!

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

From time to time a Linux distribution comes along that just works. Often review writers call them “Windows Killers!” PCLinuxOS version .92 test 2 is one of those special, English only, distros that can make an old Windows user into a new Linux user.

The Knoppix Advantage

Filed under
Reviews

There is a great deal of discussion going on about which distribution is most ideal for the desktop, with people taking different sides. If you ask me, Knoppix scores over other distros when it comes to installing Linux on old machines. Let me elaborate on how I reached this conclusion.

GPL 'minimises risks of open source'

Filed under
OSS

Eben Moglen, a prominent open source software lawyer, argued that legal risks from using free and open source software have been minimised by the GPL.

Introducing GoboLinux 012

Filed under
Reviews

It's rare to see a new distribution that isn't a Debian or Red Hat clone in disguise with an extra feature or two, or that dares to take a bold departure from the status quo. One of those rarities, however, is GoboLinux.

Novell Confirmed Layoff of 600

Filed under
Linux

Linux software company Novell Inc. of Waltham confirmed yesterday that it is laying off about 600 workers, or 10 percent of the company's worldwide workforce of 5,800.

An Arabian Night

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Arabian Linux 0.6 beta 4 was released on or about September 4, and at the request of a reader, Tuxmachines downloaded, burnt and test drove this lovely installable livecd tonight. As the name implies Arabian is primarily designed for Arabian speaking users, however it does have support for English as well. Since this latest release is two month old, some of the packages are going to seem a big dated, but it none the less is worth a look. Great looks, stability, and imaginative customizations make Arabian a worthy contender in either language. In fact, Tuxmachines was quite impressed.

Firefox releases 2nd 1.5 beta, tops 11% marketshare

Filed under
Software

The Mozilla project Wednesday released another beta version of the Firefox 1.5 browser and now topped the 11 percent mark of the browser market.

Nokia Bases Mobile Web Browser on KDE Technology

Filed under
KDE

Nokia has unveiled their new web browser for its mobile phones, based upon the KDE Project's open source technology. The browser uses the KHTML and KJS rendering engines to provide a fast and powerful web browser.

YAMR: Mandriva Linux 2006

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

MandrakeLinux always had a reputation as an ideal distribution for beginners. Now that the renamed Mandriva has included technologies from Conectiva and Lycoris into Mandriva Linux 2006, this reputation seems more justified than ever.

Shout goes out over PHP security bugs

Filed under
Security

Security researchers have identified numerous new vulnerabilities in PHP - the popular, open source web development environment.

The Concept of "Interfaces"

Filed under
Software

Novell recently released some video of "usability" testing featuring 11 people who were familiar with Windows trying to accomplish various tasks under the Linux Desktop. Now, to me, that doesn't sound really effective.

M$ is Threatening Korea Again

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft, the world’s biggest software maker, has renewed its threat to pull the Windows operating system out of Korea, if the ongoing investigation by the nation’s antitrust agency doesn’t turn out to be in its favor.

Open source start-ups make their pitch - in public

Filed under
OSS

Three open source start-up executives Tuesday showed their daring by making pitches to potential customers. What made them daring is that they did it in front of dozens of attendees at the Open Source Business Conference in Newton, Mass.

Linux PCs: Customer service or lip service?

Filed under
Linux

Thinking about buying a new Linux-based home PC? Happy hunting.

n/a

How to Save Your Neck in a Four Easy Steps

Filed under
Misc

Say what you will about Novell CEO Jack Messman, he's no dummy. Maybe it's for the good of Novell or maybe just to save his own neck, but since early September when Blum Capital and Credit Suisse First Boston went public with their gripes that the former railroad exec was fumbling Novell's golden opportunity to be the Red Hat challenger, he has been making big conciliatory moves fast.

The Yin and Yang of Open Source Commerce, Part 1

Filed under
OSS

In this series, we will consider key aspects that impact the future of OSS in the business and consumer markets. Will OSS re-shape the entire IT industry, or will it never be more than a passing fad for niche players?

Trying out the new OpenBSD 3.8

Filed under
Reviews

Yesterday OpenBSD, the proactively secure Unix-like operating system, released version 3.8, featuring several improvements to networking, RAID management tools, and increased security. I took this new release as an opportunity to perform my first ever OpenBSD install.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.

A GTK+ 3 update

  • A GTK+ 3 update
    When we started development towards GTK+ 4, we laid out a plan that said GTK+ 3.22 would be the final, stable branch of GTK+ 3. And we’ve stuck to this for a while. I has served us reasonably well — GTK+ 3 stopped changing in drastic ways, which was well-received, and we are finally seeing applications moving from GTK+ 2.
  • GTK+ 3.24 To Deliver Some New Features While Waiting For GTK4
    While the GNOME tool-kit developers have been hard at work on GTK4 roughly the past two years and have kept GTK3 frozen at GTK+ 3.22, a GTK+ 3.24 release is now being worked on to deliver some new features until GTK+ 4.0 is ready to be released. While GTK+ 4.0 is shaping up well and GTK+ 3.22 was planned to be the last GTK3 stable release, the developers have had second thoughts due to GTK+ 4 taking time to mature. Some limited new features are being offered up in the GTK+ 3.24 release to debut this September.

Finally: First stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5

After almost exactly two years of being work-in-progress, the first stable release of KBibTeX for KDE Frameworks 5 has been published! You can grab the sources at your local KDE mirror. Some distributions like ArchLinux already ship binary packages. After one beta and one release candidate, now comes the final release. You may wonder why this release gets version number 0.8.1 but not 0.8 as expected. This is simply due to the fact that I noticed a bug in CMakeLists.txt when computing version numbers which did not work if the version number just had two fields, i. e. no ‘patch’ version. As the code and the tag of 0.8 was already pushed, I had no alternative than to fix the problem and increase the version number. Otherwise, the ChangeLog (alternative view) is virtually unchanged compared to the last pre-release. Read more

Today in Techrights