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Friday, 18 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story FreeBSD 9.3-RC1 Now Available Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2014 - 7:15am
Story Replacing freecode: a proposal Roy Schestowitz 22/06/2014 - 7:11am
Story Lubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr : Video Review and Screenshot Tour larryhill 22/06/2014 - 6:52am
Story Will Carriers Step Up to Open Challenge? Roy Schestowitz 21/06/2014 - 8:41pm
Story Weston DRM Compositor Support Proposed For NVIDIA's TK1 Rianne Schestowitz 21/06/2014 - 8:24pm
Story Porting Software To Qt5, KDE Frameworks 5 Rianne Schestowitz 21/06/2014 - 7:59pm
Story Debian 8.0 Jessie Testing Against Updated Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 21/06/2014 - 7:46pm
Story Mageia 4.1 Released, LXLE 14.04 Review, and LibreOffice 4.2.5 Rianne Schestowitz 21/06/2014 - 7:38pm
Story First impressions: Canonical Orange Box and Juju (Gallery) Rianne Schestowitz 21/06/2014 - 7:23pm
Story Freshen up your KDE’s Plasma desktop using Evolvere icons Roy Schestowitz 21/06/2014 - 7:23pm

Sun Finalizes Open-Source Java Plans

Filed under
OSS

Sun Microsystems is gradually providing more details on how it plans to open source its core Java technology, delivering on a promise the company made to developers back in May at its JavaOne conference.

U.S. intelligence goes Wikipedia route

Filed under
Misc

Noticing the popularity of the Internet Wikipedia in which users add and edit material, all 16 U.S. intelligence agencies have created their own secure version.

Mandriva 2007: Back in the race

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

Beginning with an easy-to-use installer and booting into a well-thought-out desktop, Mandriva 2007 provides an environment that is aesthetically consistent and makes new users feel at home. Overall Mandriva 2007 re-establishes the distribution as one of the most advanced desktop experiences in GNU/Linux.

simple samba slackware setup

Filed under
HowTos

If you are wanting to connect your Windows machine(s) to your Linux machine(s) over your network, then Samba is what you need. Essentially, Samba allows your Linux machine to communicate with your Windows network to share files, resources, and printers. This document will cover the steps of installing and configuring Samba on Slackware 11.0.0.

Xfld 0.3 + Xfce 4.3.90.2 Screenshots

Filed under
Software

Xfld; ever hear of it? Neither did we until hearing of its third (0.3) release. Xfld is a Xubuntu-based LiveCD that ships with the latest development build of the Xfce desktop environment. Xfld v0.3 includes Xfce 4.3.90.2 and is based on Ubuntu Edgy Eft 6.10. With that said we decided to take a look at this LiveCD release. Those Great Looking Screenshots.

Cacti bandwidth monitoring tool in debian etch

Filed under
HowTos

Cacti is a complete network graphing solution designed to harness the power of RRDTool’s data storage and graphing functionality. Cacti provides a fast poller, advanced graph templating, multiple data acquisition methods, and user management features out of the box. All of this is wrapped in an intuitive, easy to use interface that makes sense for LAN-sized installations up to complex networks with hundreds of devices.

TUX Issue #19 Now Available

Filed under
Linux

Issue number 19, November 2006, of TUX now is available. Subscribers, you can download this issue here or simply follow the Download TUX button on the right to download the current issue.

The magic sysreq options introduced

Filed under
HowTos

The sysreq key is a "magical" key combination to which your Linux kernel will respond, regardless of whatever it is doing. On x86 you press the key combo 'ALT-SysRq-'

Ubuntu Tricks - How to mount Windows partitions read/writable

Previously I looked at mounting your NTFS drive on your Ubuntu box using raw Fuse to do it. Now we’re going to look at what may be a better way to do it. It’s certainly easier and from reports, NTFS-3G is a bit more stable as well. This Howto is written specifically for and from Ubuntu 6.10 - Edgy Eft but should work on any Debian based distro.

Ubuntu 6.10 Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you're a Linux enthusiast you probably noticed what a great month we've had. Slackware 11.0 was released on the 3rd. Mandriva 2007 was released the same day and showed us how integrated XGL, Compiz and AIGLX could be. Fedora Core 6 was released on the 24th and brought us an amazing Gnome 2.16 desktop with fabulous artwork. Ubuntu 6.10 came on the 26th and we couldn't wait to review it.

Krita Team Seeking Artwork for User Gallery

Filed under
KDE

With Krita's recent 1.6 release enhancing its usability for professional artwork, the Krita team is looking into creating a gallery where Krita users can contribute their art made with it.

What lies ahead for Nvu

Filed under
Software

Nvu has been one of my favorite open source web editors since its 1.0 release in 2005. However its been more than a year since no new version has been released, so there had been speculation that the project had been canceled by Daniel Glazman. Last Monday I caught up with him in an IRC session, and I want to share some stuff that he discussed.

29.8% of XP users may move to Linux over Vista

Filed under
Linux

For the past couple of weeks there has been a poll active on the front-page of this site asking users what they feel their best option is with Vista poking it's glossy head over the horizon. Those of us who wish to remain legal have a crisis on our hands. So, the question: What will you do when Vista lands?

Why Chicago Chose Linux

Filed under
Linux

As the platform architect for the city of Chicago, Amy Niersbach had a decision to make. The city’s IT infrastructure needed some refreshing. Chicago wanted to rid itself of its vintage mainframes, and its aging Sun Solaris servers were costly to maintain. The Windy City needed a major migration. But to what?

kickoff season

Filed under
SUSE

openSUSE 10.2 beta 1 has recently been released and one of the highlights of this release is Kickoff – the revolutionary and redesigned KDE menu for openSUSE 10.2.

Linux distros Ubuntu, Trustix, and Suse accused of email spam

Filed under
Linux

Some Linux distributions - specifically Ubuntu, Trustix, and Suse - stand accused of sending potential email spam. This is because once signed up to their email lists, it is next to impossible for users to unsubscribe.

How are you syncing files across systems?

Filed under
Software

So I’ve been taking an informal poll of the sysadmins I know to find out how people are managing the synchronization of files across a server farm. Looks like there are three popular ways of handling this, which I’ll list in no particular order:

Open standards group to beat Microsoft at its own game

The first "dynamic coalition" resulting from the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) has vowed to get governments interested in adopting open standards for both hardware and software.

Raster image editors: A comparative look at the GIMP and Krita

Filed under
Software

With the release of Krita 1.6, it seems like a good time to compare the two big raster image editors for Linux. Coming as they do from the divergent GTK+ and KDE programming camps, it can be hard to assess the differences between the GIMP and Krita without being swayed by politics and emotion. Let's take a cold, hard look at the two, and compare the features side by side.

Explosions Reported at Building Housing PayPal

Filed under
Web

San Jose firefighters Tuesday night responded to reports of explosions from within a four-story building in San Jose that has also drawn responses from a bomb squad and a hazardous materials team.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Nouvea, NVIDIA RTX "Turing", KDE Plasma 5.15 Beta Wayland Session, Qt5 GUIs With Spying

  • Nouveau Open-Source Driver Will Now Work With NVIDIA RTX 2080 Ti On Linux 5.0
    Among the many Linux 5.0 kernel features is initial open-source NVIDIA driver support for the latest-generation Turing graphics processors. Missed out on during the Linux 5.0 merge window was "TU102" support but now that is coming down as a fix for the 5.0 kernel. Back in December, Ben Skeggs of Red Hat posted the initial Turing support for Nouveau in the form of the TU104 (RTX 2080) and TU106 (RTX 2060/2070) but was lacking coverage of the TU102, which is for the flagship RTX 2080 Ti and TITAN RTX. He wasn't able to test the support at the time and thus left it out. Skeggs has now been able to verify the TU102 support is working and that patch is now on its way to the mainline kernel tree.
  • Quake 2 Gets Real-Time Path Tracing Powered By NVIDIA RTX / VK_NV_ray_tracing
    For those Linux gamers with a NVIDIA RTX "Turing" graphics card, there's finally an interesting open-source workload to enjoy that makes use of the RTX hardware and NVIDIA's VK_NV_ray_tracing extension... A real-time path tracing port of the legendary Quake 2 game. While Quake II recently saw a Vulkan port, university students have now done an "RTX" port for Quake 2 with the new Q2VKPT project.
  • KDE Plasma 5.15 Beta Wayland Run Through
    In this video, we look at KDE Plasma 5.15 Beta the Wayland Session. Please keep in mind that it is still in development and the Xorg session is perfect.
  • Qt 5.13 Might Add QTelemetry For Opt-In Anonymous Data Collection
    The next release of the Qt5 tool-kit might introduce a potentially controversial module to facilitate anonymous data collection of Qt applications.  The addition of Qt Telemetry has been under code review since last September. There was some reviews taking place and code revisions happening but since November that review dried up. 

Pseudo-Open Source (Openwashing)

  • Red Hat drops MongoDB over SSPL; MDB -3%
    Amazon responded by launching DocumentDB, a managed database that's compatible with existing MongoDB applications and tools. DocumentDB works with MongoDB version 3.6, which predates the SSPL license.
  • Governance without rules: How the potential for forking helps projects
    The speed and agility of open source projects benefit from lightweight and flexible governance. Their ability to run with such efficient governance is supported by the potential for project forking. That potential provides a discipline that encourages participants to find ways forward in the face of unanticipated problems, changed agendas, or other sources of disagreement among participants. The potential for forking is a benefit that is available in open source projects because all open source licenses provide needed permissions. In contrast, standards development is typically constrained to remain in a particular forum. In other words, the ability to move the development of the standard elsewhere is not generally available as a disciplining governance force. Thus, forums for standards development typically require governance rules and procedures to maintain fairness among conflicting interests.
  • Oracle exec: Open-source vendors locking down licences proves 'they were never really open'
  • MoltenVK Sees Big Update To Jump-Start Vulkan On macOS In 2019
  • Facebook 'Likes' (And Open Sources) Better Mobile Image Software
  • Open source Spectrum library enables edge processing of images for faster performance
    Spectrum, an open source image processing library from Facebook, aims to give developers the ability to perform image transformation client-side, with predictable, repeatable results on different platforms. The library can be integrated into Android or iOS apps, and uses C/C++ code for higher performance with Java and Objective-C wrapper APIs for integration ease. Spectrum's API is declarative, allowing developers to define the target output characteristics, leaving the work of formulating settings to achieve that goal to the library itself.

The Best Open Source Software in 2018 (Users’ Choice)

LibreOffice is a free and open source office suite written in C++, Java, and Python. It was first released in January 2011 by The Document Foundation and has since known to be the most reliable open source office suite. Read more

How Do You Fedora: Journey into 2019

Jose plans on continuing to push open source initiatives such as cloud and container infrastructures. He will also continue teaching advanced Unix systems administration. “I am now helping a new generation of Red Hat Certified Professionals seek their place in the world of open source. It is indeed a joy when a student mentions they have obtained their certification because of what they were exposed to in my class.” He also plans on spending some more time with his art again. Carlos would like to write for Fedora Magazine and help bring the magazine to the Latin American community. “I would like to contribute to Fedora Magazine. If possible I would like to help with the magazine in Spanish.” Akinsola wants to hold a Fedora a release part in 2019. “I want make many people aware of Fedora, make them aware they can be part of the release and it is easy to do.” He would also like to ensure that new Fedora users have an easy time of adapting to their new OS. Kevin is planning is excited about 2019 being a time of great change for Fedora. “In 2019 I am looking forward to seeing what and how we retool things to allow for lifecycle changes and more self service deliverables. I think it’s going to be a ton of work, but I am hopeful we will come out of it with a much better structure to carry us forward to the next period of Fedora success.” Kevin also had some words of appreciation for everyone in the Fedora community. “I’d like to thank everyone in the Fedora community for all their hard work on Fedora, it wouldn’t exist without the vibrant community we have.” Read more