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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 15 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Document Foundation Officially Releases LibreOffice 4.2.4 Rianne Schestowitz 08/05/2014 - 2:50pm
Story Firefox 30 Beta 2 Brings Better Integration with Social Networks, Australis Stays Put Rianne Schestowitz 08/05/2014 - 2:46pm
Blog entry Secret Back Doors in Android Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2014 - 2:37pm
Story Linux desktop environment LXQt achieves first release Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2014 - 8:20am
Story Making Linux Feel at Home Roy Schestowitz 08/05/2014 - 8:18am
Story How Google's Android Silver could become 'Wintel for phones' Rianne Schestowitz 08/05/2014 - 7:39am
Story New DE LXQt Released, Linux Drones, and Deploying Linux Rianne Schestowitz 08/05/2014 - 7:14am
Story GNOME Wayland Is Approved For Fedora 21 Rianne Schestowitz 08/05/2014 - 7:04am
Story The State Of The Intel Kernel DRM Driver Rianne Schestowitz 08/05/2014 - 2:03am
Story Google Open-Sources Their AutoFDO Profile Toolchain Rianne Schestowitz 08/05/2014 - 1:06am

Open Source: changing the world and web

Filed under
OSS

Let’s face it, not everyone is a tech junkie at this stage in their life (I know that I am not) but the further one gets in their college career, the closer we get to the corporate realm, and it is important to note one of the most interesting tech issue revolutionizing our world, open source programming.

Review: Novell Suse Linux Enterprise 10

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Reviews

If you’re planning to deploy Linux, the Suse Linux Enterprise 10 is a hard act to beat, especially if migrating from or integrating with Windows.

Ubuntu 6.06 Dapper Drake: Solving Hardware Compatibility

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Reviews

So most of us have read review after review on just how fantastic Ubuntu is. And you know something, they're right - this really is a fantastic Linux distribution for the newer Linux enthusiast. But there often times appear to be some confusion as to accomplishing tasks they once would do in Windows pretty easily. On the whole, the confusion stems from hardware compatibly issues and today we are going to look into resolving those issues with ease.

Report on the Fourth International GPLv3 Conference

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OSS

Last month the Free Software Foundation (FSF) held its Fourth International Conference on GPLv3 at the Indian Institute of Management in Bangalore. Around 150 participants from all over India and abroad, including Japan, France, and Germany, attended. Since this was the first conference after the second draft of GPLv3, which saw several extensive revisions, both Richard Stallman and Eben Moglen painstakingly explained the new draft, and took many questions from attendees.

PC-BSD Interview

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Interviews

PC-BSD is one of the newest additions to the BSD family. The focus for this project is to create a user-friendly desktop experience based on FreeBSD and it has quickly garnered attention from media and the community. Kris Moore founder and lead developer of PC-BSD took some time off to answer a few questions about the past and current state of the project in general and its relation to KDE in particular.

Savage: The Battle for Newerth now Freeware

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Gaming

If you woke up this morning, and felt like dropping half a bill to get Savage:TBfN from Tuxgames. Well DON'T! As of September 1st, 2006, s2games released their gem, Savage: The Battle for Newerth, as freeware for Linux, Windows and Mac users.

ATI Fedora Installation

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HowTos

Introduced in the 8.27.10 display drivers was packaging support for Fedora Core. Presently supported by these scripts are Fedora Core 3, 4, 5, and the initial support for 6 (Test 2). Also supported is Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3 and 4. Generating these RPM packages of the fglrx drivers is actually quite an easy process. Below are the general guidelines.

GNOME 2.16 Released

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Software

Although we are awaiting official announcements, it appears gnome 2.16 has been finalized. According to release notes and packages on mirrors, it is here.

Linux Surveys

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Linux

Is Linux dying in the embedded space? Or is it healthier than ever? Surveys don't paint a clear picture.

DOS lives! Open source reinvents past

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OSS

Twelve years after Microsoft announced it would stop development of DOS, an open source replacement - FreeDOS - has hit its 1.0 release.

Ubuntu Christian Edition 1.2

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Reviews
Ubuntu
-s

I've been a bit intrigued since first hearing of Ubuntu Christian Edition. I had previously downloaded version 1.0, but didn't get around to testing it. I hadn't deleted it yet in hopes I'd find the time to review it. So, when 1.2 was recently released, I thought here was my chance. But after testing it, I'm left scratching my head.

Ubuntu leaps forward with new innovations

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Ubuntu

Upon developing a quite solid desktop operating system, Ubuntu seems to be moving forward with new innovations, this time, I would say, pushing the boundaries of the GNU/Linux world even further.

Linux wins over new fans

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Ubuntu

Linux is shedding its hard-core techie image in a bid to woo ordinary human beings seeking an easy-to-use operating system that can be downloaded for free.

Bergen puts Linux plan on hold

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Linux

Bergen has become the latest city to rethink its plan to move to open source software. Two years ago, Norway's second-largest city hit the headlines when it announced it would move all its 15,000 civil servants and 36,000 teachers and students to Linux, moving away from Microsoft's proprietary software. Instead, the city will stick with Microsoft.

'FOSS, bandwidth key' - Shuttleworth

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OSS

Free software, skills and bandwidth are the key anchors of a successful ICT programme. This is what Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth told the delegates at the ISPA iWeek conference in Midrand this morning.

Hands on help: Can I read NFTS partitions with Linux?

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HowTos

I dual boot with XP and Linux and I have heard that Linux can read and write to NTFS partitions, but I can’t do it. Can you help?

Win a copies of “The Linux® Kernel Primer” and “Linux® Debugging and Performance Tuning”

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Linux

This week FreeSoftwareMagazine is giving away a copy of The Linux® Kernel Primer: A Top-Down Approach for x86 and PowerPC Architectures AND a copy of Linux® Debugging and Performance Tuning: Tips and Techniques.

teehee! IE 7 site leads to Firefox hole

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Web

Online users that key in www.ie7.com expecting to locate information on the upcoming Microsoft browser IE 7, will instead see a big logo of Firefox, the open source browser developed by Mozilla.

hmmm, Loony Linux

Filed under
Linux

Richard Stallman is the founder of the FSF or the Free Software Foundation, which was formed in 1984 to promote free software development as opposed to proprietary software for which he also started something called the GNU project. Linux has about 2% of the global desktop market share so coming across a Linux desktop itself is a rarity. But all of that might soon change as our very own Kerala state government has announced that it will promote and encourage the usage of Linux systems as opposed to Microsoft

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Audiocasts: Linux in the Ham Shack, Ubuntu Podcast, Full Circle Weekly News and Python

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GNOME Development Leftovers

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