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Sunday, 23 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Non-Linux FOSS: Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray) Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 11:18pm
Story Red Hat Academy Expands Training, Includes OpenStack Coursework Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 11:09pm
Story Valve Updates SteamOS With CPU/GPU Optimizations Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 11:03pm
Story Linux.conf.au, Linux Darling, and More Linux List Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:58pm
Story CyanogenMod launches new Gallery App Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:44pm
Story Linux Mint 16: No Surprises, but Plenty of Solid Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:39pm
Story AMD's Updated Catalyst Linux Driver Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:28pm
Story Fedora 18 Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Fedora 20 Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:21pm
Story Chrome 32 Has New Tab Indicators, Better Performance Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:14pm
Story Report: Android apps will soon be accepted on BlackBerry World Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:07pm

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Experimenting with Open-Source Security Tools

Filed under
OSS

There is a wide spectrum of open-source security software that is currently available for deployment within the enterprise. Learn how to determine if an open-source security tool is a safe, appropriate and effective choice for your organization.

FAA saves money with Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

The Federal Aviation Administration has moved its airline traffic management and real-time tracking systems from a Unix platform to Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Theoretical Hacking for IT Managers

Filed under
Security

Not everyone has "l33t skilz" or mass amounts of hardened TCP/IP stack programming experience. When I'm at work, I don't look at logs all day long, nor do I run security audits every five minutes. I do my job, which takes all of my time. This is the situation for most small to medium sized companies that have only a few IT guys. So how does an everyday IT guy handle the constant threat of impending attack?

Ubuntu Default Root Password or the sudo way

Filed under
HowTos

The first time I installed Ubuntu on a computer, I was rather used to debian and went through the whole install process easily. When I rebooted my system and open a text-console, my first action was to su - in order to gain root’s grants. What a surprise when I was promted for a password. D*mn, What was it?!?

Desktop Linux in Government

Filed under
Linux

This research report by a third-year graduate student examines the growing use of desktop Linux among governments in the U.S. and globally. Drawing on published research and comments from industry analysts, the author hypothesizes that desktop Linux may be nearing a tipping point within government settings, after which adoption can be expected to accelerate.

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SuSE 10.1 RC3 or Final

Filed under
News

The OpenSuSE Roadmap for their 10.1 release schedule has been updated: It now appears that a RC3 might be in the works and possibly released on Apr 28.

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Linux desktop standard ropes in industry heavyweights

Filed under
Linux

An initiative to create a standardised Linux desktop, with the support of the major vendors, has brought user friendly open source PCs one step closer to reality.

Also: KDE's core library - Qt - included in new LSB desktop standard

Network your music with DAAP for Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Apple's iTunes popularized the Digital Audio Access Protocol (DAAP) for simple networked music playlist sharing. Linux users can take advantage of it too. Linux users can choose from several easy-to-use DAAP servers for sharing music, and several DAAP-aware applications for listening to it -- as well as discover and tune in to other people's collections.

Speedup DNS requests with a local cache

Filed under
HowTos

One common server bottleneck is DNS lookups. Many common server tasks such as from looking up hostnames to write Apache logfiles and processing incoming mail require the use of DNS queries. If you're running a high-traffic system it might be useful to cache previous lookups.

Sourcefire Has Big Plans For Open-Source Snort

Filed under
Software

The U.S. government may have stopped Sourcefire Inc.'s plans to merge with Check Point Software Technologies Ltd., but Sourcefire still has big plans for the expansion of its open-source Snort-based network security technology.

Microsoft Complains Rivals Get 'Free Ride'

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Corp. complained Wednesday that the European Commission had forced it to hand over trade secrets to rivals, effectively giving them a "free ride" on the work the software maker did to acquire new customers and develop new technologies. But Microsoft's rivals said the company was trying to turn the case into a debate over intellectual property rights and skirt the commission's argument that Microsoft has abused its monopoly.

Banks 'should give back to open source community'

Filed under
OSS

Linux on Wall Street: Financial companies are making increasing use of open source, but experts say they are among the worst where it comes to 'playing nice'

10 world-changing social innovations

Filed under
Misc

As named in the Young Foundation publication Social Silicon Valleys, A Manifesto For Social Innovation

8. Linux software - and other open source methods such as Wikipedia and Ohmynews that are transforming many fields.

Writing device drivers in Linux: A brief tutorial

Filed under
HowTos

There are several different devices in Linux. For simplicity, this brief tutorial will only cover type char devices loaded as modules. Kernel 2.6.x will be used (in particular, kernel 2.6.8 under Debian Sarge, which is now Debian Stable).

Killing With Linux: A Primer

Filed under
HowTos

So there you are, dutifully wading through the documentation for whatever gnarly Linux application you're rassling into submission. You're running commands and editing configuration files and things are working and life is good. Until -- yes, you knew the good times weren't going to last -- until you hit the dreaded "send the process a SIGHUP" instruction.

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More in Tux Machines

LAS 2018

  • LAS 2018
    This month I was at my second Libre Application Summit in Denver. A smaller event than GUADEC but personally was my favorite conference so far. One of the main goals of LAS has been to be a place for multiple platforms to discuss the desktop space and not just be a GNOME event. This year two KDE members, @aleixpol and Albert Astals Cid, who spoke about release cycle of KDE Applications, Plasma, and the history of Qt. It is always interesting to see how another project solves the same problems and where there is overlap. The elementary folks were there since this is @cassidyjames home turf who had a great “It’s Not Always Techincal” talk as well as a talk with @danrabbit about AppCenter which are both very important areas the GNOME Project needs to improve in. I also enjoyed meeting a few other community members such as @Philip-Scott and talk about their use of elementary’s platform.
  • Developer Center Initiative – Meeting Summary 21st September
    Since last blog post there’s been two Developer Center meetings held in coordination with LAS GNOME Sunday the 9th September and again Friday the 21st September. Unfortunately I couldn’t attend the LAS GNOME meeting, but I’ll cover the general progress made here.

The "Chinese EPYC" Hygon Dhyana CPU Support Still Getting Squared Away For Linux

Back in June is when the Linux kernel patches appeared for the Hygon Dhyana, the new x86 processors based on AMD Zen/EPYC technology licensed by Chengdu Haiguang IC Design Co for use in Chinese data-centers. While the patches have been out for months, they haven't reached the mainline kernel quite yet but that might change next cycle. The Hygon Dyhana Linux kernel patches have gone through several revisions and the code is mostly adapting existing AMD Linux kernel code paths for Zen/EPYC to do the same on these new processors. While these initial Hygon CPUs appear to basically be re-branded EPYC CPUs, the identifiers are different as rather than AMD Family 17h, it's now Family 18h and the CPU Vendor ID is "HygonGenuine" and carries a new PCI Express device vendor ID, etc. So the different areas of the kernel from CPUFreq to KVM/Xen virtualization to Spectre V2 mitigations had to be updated for the correct behavior. Read more

Good Support For Wayland Remote Desktop Handling On Track For KDE Plasma 5.15

The KDE Plasma 5.15 release due out next year will likely be in good shape for Wayland remote desktop handling. The KDE Plasma/KWin developers have been pursuing Wayland remote desktop support along a similar route to the GNOME Shell camp by making use of PipeWire and the XDG-Desktop-Portal. Bits are already in place for KDE Plasma 5.13 and the upcoming 5.14 release, but for the 5.15 release is now where it sounds like the support may be in good shape for end-users. Read more

Linux developers threaten to pull “kill switch”

Linux powers the internet, the Android in your pocket, and perhaps even some of your household appliances. A controversy over politics is now seeing some of its developers threatening to withdraw the license to all of their code, potentially destroying or making the whole Linux kernel unusable for a very long time. Read more