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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 20 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Enlightenment’s E17: Ready for prime time? srlinuxx 27/01/2013 - 8:34pm
Story The Biggest systemd Myths srlinuxx 27/01/2013 - 8:21pm
Story Best alternative Linux desktops: 5 reviewed and rated srlinuxx 27/01/2013 - 6:23pm
Story A quick look at Manjaro srlinuxx 27/01/2013 - 5:05am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 11:19pm
Story Ubuntu Not Switching to Rolling Release Model srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:55am
Story Xfce 4.12 Desktop Is Moving Along For Release Soon srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:53am
Story Design the New OpenMandriva Logo srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:51am
Story Does SUSE Linux Have A Future? srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:50am
Story Cinnarch preview srlinuxx 25/01/2013 - 9:50pm

Novell Confirmed Layoff of 600

Filed under
Linux

Linux software company Novell Inc. of Waltham confirmed yesterday that it is laying off about 600 workers, or 10 percent of the company's worldwide workforce of 5,800.

An Arabian Night

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Arabian Linux 0.6 beta 4 was released on or about September 4, and at the request of a reader, Tuxmachines downloaded, burnt and test drove this lovely installable livecd tonight. As the name implies Arabian is primarily designed for Arabian speaking users, however it does have support for English as well. Since this latest release is two month old, some of the packages are going to seem a big dated, but it none the less is worth a look. Great looks, stability, and imaginative customizations make Arabian a worthy contender in either language. In fact, Tuxmachines was quite impressed.

Firefox releases 2nd 1.5 beta, tops 11% marketshare

Filed under
Software

The Mozilla project Wednesday released another beta version of the Firefox 1.5 browser and now topped the 11 percent mark of the browser market.

Nokia Bases Mobile Web Browser on KDE Technology

Filed under
KDE

Nokia has unveiled their new web browser for its mobile phones, based upon the KDE Project's open source technology. The browser uses the KHTML and KJS rendering engines to provide a fast and powerful web browser.

YAMR: Mandriva Linux 2006

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

MandrakeLinux always had a reputation as an ideal distribution for beginners. Now that the renamed Mandriva has included technologies from Conectiva and Lycoris into Mandriva Linux 2006, this reputation seems more justified than ever.

Shout goes out over PHP security bugs

Filed under
Security

Security researchers have identified numerous new vulnerabilities in PHP - the popular, open source web development environment.

The Concept of "Interfaces"

Filed under
Software

Novell recently released some video of "usability" testing featuring 11 people who were familiar with Windows trying to accomplish various tasks under the Linux Desktop. Now, to me, that doesn't sound really effective.

M$ is Threatening Korea Again

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft, the world’s biggest software maker, has renewed its threat to pull the Windows operating system out of Korea, if the ongoing investigation by the nation’s antitrust agency doesn’t turn out to be in its favor.

Open source start-ups make their pitch - in public

Filed under
OSS

Three open source start-up executives Tuesday showed their daring by making pitches to potential customers. What made them daring is that they did it in front of dozens of attendees at the Open Source Business Conference in Newton, Mass.

Linux PCs: Customer service or lip service?

Filed under
Linux

Thinking about buying a new Linux-based home PC? Happy hunting.

n/a

How to Save Your Neck in a Four Easy Steps

Filed under
Misc

Say what you will about Novell CEO Jack Messman, he's no dummy. Maybe it's for the good of Novell or maybe just to save his own neck, but since early September when Blum Capital and Credit Suisse First Boston went public with their gripes that the former railroad exec was fumbling Novell's golden opportunity to be the Red Hat challenger, he has been making big conciliatory moves fast.

The Yin and Yang of Open Source Commerce, Part 1

Filed under
OSS

In this series, we will consider key aspects that impact the future of OSS in the business and consumer markets. Will OSS re-shape the entire IT industry, or will it never be more than a passing fad for niche players?

Trying out the new OpenBSD 3.8

Filed under
Reviews

Yesterday OpenBSD, the proactively secure Unix-like operating system, released version 3.8, featuring several improvements to networking, RAID management tools, and increased security. I took this new release as an opportunity to perform my first ever OpenBSD install.

OSBC, DAY 1

Filed under
OSS

Well, that was a day well spent. Today's day at OSBC was a solid investment of my time. The most interesting interchanges came on borrowed time in hallways with folks like Stephe Walli or Scott Dietzen, but I'm delighted to report that the sessions were almost universally high value.

Image Management with F-Spot

Filed under
Software

Images. Oodles and oodles of images. Images coming out of your ears. Images scattered all over your hard drive. Images everywhere, relentlessly growing in numbers! How can your organize such an insane glut of images? Help!

Novell Changes Leadership

Filed under
Linux

Novell announced on Tuesday that the previous day its board of directors had promoted Ron Hovsepian, executive VP and president of global field operations, to president and chief operating officer of Novell.

Open Source For The Next Generation

Filed under
OSS

For today's young adults, buying shrink-wrapped software to load on a PC is as foreign as fiddling with rabbit ears to improve TV reception.

n/a

Move over, Mac Mini -- MiniPC runs Linux

Filed under
Hardware

A Taiwanese systems integrator is readying a tiny 6.5 x 6.5 x 2 Linux-powered PC likely to make even Mac Mini owners envious.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sculpt for The Curious
    Sculpt for The Curious is the second development stage of the Genode-based general-purpose OS used at Genode Labs. Compared to the initial version, which was targeted at early adopters only, the new version invites a broader user base to explore the system. It comes in the form of a ready-to-use disk image for a bootable USB thumb drive.
  • Genode-Based Sculpt OS Now Available With Easy-To-Use Disk Image
    Sculpt OS is striving to become a general purpose operating system built off the Genode OS framework. The second release of Sculpt OS is now available and it's much easier now to try out. Sculpt OS relies upon Genode's micro-kernel architecture, sandboxed drivers, and other modern approaches for providing a unique OS on commodity PC hardware.
  • Bitfi and McAfee Announce First Truly Unhackable and Open Source Crypto Wallet
    Bitfi, a global payments technology company working to enable businesses and consumers to participate in the digital currency economy, today announced Bitfi Wallet – the first unhackable, open source hardware wallet with an accompanying dashboard that features wireless setup and support for many popular cryptocurrencies and crypto assets, including Monero, a fully decentralized private cryptocurrency that has previously never had a hardware wallet solution.
  • Call for Code is open and organizations are lining up to join the cause
    Today is the first official day of Call for Code, an annual global initiative from creator David Clark Cause, with IBM proudly serving as Founding Partner. Call for Code aims to unleash the collective power of the global open source developer community against the growing threat of natural disasters. Even as we prepare to accept submissions from technology teams around the world, the response from the technology community has been overwhelming and today I am thrilled to announce two new partners joining the cause.
  • Getting started with Open edX to host your course
    Now in its seventh major release, the Open edX platform is a free and open source course management system that is used all over the world to host Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as well as smaller classes and training modules. To date, Open edX software has powered more than 8,000 original courses and 50 million course enrollments. You can install the platform yourself with on-premise equipment or by leveraging any of the industry-leading cloud infrastructure services providers, but it is also increasingly being made available in a Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) model from several of the project’s growing list of service providers. The Open edX platform is used by many of the world’s premier educational institutions as well as private sector companies, public sector institutions, NGOs, non-profits, and educational technology startups, and the project’s global community of service providers continues to make the platform accessible to ever-smaller organizations. If you plan to create and offer educational content to a broad audience, you should consider using the Open edX platform.
  • Friday Free Software Directory IRC meetup time: June 22nd starting at 12:00 p.m. EDT/16:00 UTC
  • Xapian Joins Conservancy as a Member Project
    Software Freedom Conservancy proudly welcomes Xapian as Conservancy's newest member project. Xapian is a probabilistic information retrieval library that allows developers to add advanced indexing and search facilities to their own applications. Conservancy, a public charity focused on ethical technology, is the home of over forty member projects dedicated to developing free and open source software. Conservancy acts as a corporate umbrella, allowing member projects to operate as charitable initiatives without having to independently manage their own corporate structure and administrative services. "We've spent the past 18 years at Xapian developing a technologically mature software package," said Olly Betts, Xapian's Project Lead. "We're excited about how Conservancy can help us extend that maturity to our project governance."
  • Python and Bash - Contenders for the most used scripting language
    Packt Publishing, publisher of software learning resources, has revealed the results of its 2018 Skill Up survey in a new report. From what programming languages, frameworks, and libraries are most used, to job satisfaction, attitudes to management and what it’s like to work in the software industry today, the report offers a snapshot of what matters to software developers in 2018.

What Is the Intersection of OpenStack and Kubernetes?

Lew Tucker is a busy man. Aside from his day job as VP and CTO for Cloud Computing at Cisco, Tucker also sits on the board of directors at both the OpenStack Foundation and the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, giving him a unique perspective on both organizations. Some in the industry have positioned Kubernetes as a competitive replacement for OpenStack, but that's not what Tucker sees. In a video interview, Tucker explains where the intersection currently exists between OpenStack and Kubernetes and why he expects both to be successful. Read more

Graphics: Vulkan, AMDGPU, Wayland

  • Vulkan Display Extensions To Be Used By SteamVR Merged Into Mesa RADV/ANV
    Keith Packard's long in development work for improving the Linux display stack infrastructure for better dealing with VR head-mounted displays is about rounded out with the new Vulkan extension support being merged into Mesa. Just over a year ago famed X developer Keith Packard started contract work for Valve to improve the plumbing around the Linux/X.Org support for virtual reality HMDs for better performance and better integration. Within the Linux kernel and the X.Org Server he's worked and landed the DRM leasing support of outputs to let a VR compositor (Steam VR) have direct access to the output, "non-desktop" quirk handling so VR HMDs don't become mapped as part of a standard Linux desktop, and related work.
  • A Slew Of AMDGPU DC Updates Published, Further Improvements For Raven Ridge
    There hasn't been a new AMDGPU DC code drop in a while as AMD developers work to improve their internal processes, but hitting the wire today is a set of 51 new patches for this "display code" stack that work on a variety of improvements.
  • Sway 1.0 Wayland Compositor Nears With Floating Windows, Tablet Support & More
    The release of the Sway 1.0 Wayland compositor is inching closer with the recent third alpha release. Sway for the uninformed is a very promising i3-compatible Wayland compositor. Earlier this month Sway 1.0 Alpha 3 was released to succeed the second alpha release from the month prior. Sway 1.0 is succeeding the Sway 0.15 changes with a great deal of improvements. Most notably with the 1.0 series is now requiring the WLROOTS modular Wayland compositor library.

Security: OpenBSD, FUD and More

  • OpenBSD Disabling SMT / Hyper Threading Due To Security Concerns
    Security oriented BSD operating system OpenBSD is making the move to disable Hyper Threading (HT) on Intel CPUs and more broadly moving to disable SMT (Simultanious Multi Threading) on other CPUs too. Disabling of Intel HT and to follow with disabling SMT for other architectures is being done in the name of security. "SMT (Simultanious Multi Threading) implementations typically share TLBs and L1 caches between threads. This can make cache timing attacks a lot easier and we strongly suspect that this will make several spectre-class bugs exploitable. Especially on Intel's SMT implementation which is better known as Hypter-threading. We really should not run different security domains on different processor threads of the same core." OpenBSD could improve their kernel's scheduler to workaround this, but given that is a large feat, at least for now they have decided to disable Hyper Threading by default. Those wishing to toggle the OpenBSD SMT support can use the new hw.smt sysctl setting on OpenBSD/AMD64 and is being extended to cover CPUs from other vendors and architectures.
  • Linux malware threats - bots, backdoors, trojans and malicious apps [Ed: Ignoring back doors in Windows and other proprietary platforms to instead focus on malicious software one actually needs to install on one's machine or choose a trivial-to-guess password (when there are open ports)]
  • Does Open Source Boost Security? Hortonworks Says Yes
    Organizations are best served security-wise if they favor and adopt open source technology — especially enterprise open source — over proprietary alternatives, according to Hortonworks. However, not everybody agrees that open source software intrinsically is more secure. It’s tough to argue that open source hasn’t brought significant benefits to the IT industry and the tens of thousands of organizations that rely on IT products to automate their operations. Starting with the introduction of Linux in the late 1990s, major swaths of the tech industry have shifted to open source development methodologies. That includes the vast majority of the big data ecosystem, which has been largely bootstrapped by various Apache Software Foundation projects.
  • Don't Neglect Open Source Security [Ed: Well, if you have chosen proprietary software, then you have already given up on security altogether. With FOSS there's at least control and hope.]
  • How to build a strong DevSecOps culture: 5 tips [Ed: Red Hat is still promoting dumb buzzwords that help employers overwork their staff]
  • A Framework to Strengthen Open Source Security and Compliance [Ed: Firms that profit from perceived insecurity of FOSS push so-called 'white papers' into IDG]