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About Tux Machines

Monday, 21 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu 14.10 Alpha 1 Flavors Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 27/06/2014 - 8:44am
Story Linux Mint 17 "Qiana" Xfce Final Version Is Out – Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:35pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:28pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:27pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:26pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:24pm
Story Rugged, shape-shifting handheld runs Android Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:21pm
Story Ubuntu MATE Remix Is Making Good Progress, Now Runs in Virtualbox Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:16pm
Story Google I/O 2014 keynote shows why Android should replace Chrome OS on Chromebooks Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 10:12pm
Story With Android One, Google is poised to own the entire world Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 9:56pm

How to copy linux to a different partition

Filed under
HowTos

We can be happily working away on our computer and we spent hours putting the final touches on the caricature of our political leader. When we try to save it we get an unable to save error. Puzzled we do a bit of investigating and find that our partition is full. After deleting a few temporary files and managing to save our masterpiece we decide that, as we haven't used windows for a long time and it is a much bigger partition, we will delete windows and move our now precious linux to the bigger partition. Then we scratch our head, sit back and think "How do I do that?". Here's how.

Outlook takes 136 years to sync email

Filed under
Humor

Microsoft has again found itself at the heart of a time-related SNAFU. While syncing outlook to our corporate email system I was rather shocked to see the "status" window informing be there was 1193046 hours remaining for the sync to complete. Thats, erm, 136 years (give or take a few days). Is this a record?

Denial of service attacks outlawed

Filed under
Security

A UK law has been passed that makes it an offence to launch denial of service attacks, which experts had previously called "a legal grey area."

Report from the Ubuntu Developer Summit

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu developers and other interested parties from all over the world have swarmed to Google's offices in Mountain View this week for the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) to plan out the next release of Ubuntu.

The Open-Source Impact

Filed under
OSS

Is open-source software making an impact in small and medium-sized enterprises? That depends on whom you ask. Open-source developers and service providers will sing the praises of software that is not only free but also frees you from many long-established commercial restraints.

Customizing Your Ubuntu Linux Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux expert Marcel Gagne shows how to customize your Ubuntu Linux system to make it truly yours — change your background, your colors, your fonts, and anything else you need to create a desktop as individual as you are.

Developing with Apache Derby – Hitting the Trifecta

This article reviews how to modify an SQL query to group related rows together to provide summary statistics database information and introduces the concept of a view, which can be used to simplify database application development by creating a virtual table that represents the results of an SQL query. Also learn about database indexes, which you can use to locate specific table rows. After you've mastered these advanced database concepts, you'll be well positioned to begin developing Java database applications with Apache Derby.

SFLC’s Bradley M. Kuhn on Novell-Microsoft

Filed under
SUSE

A careful examination of Microsoft’s Patent Pledge for Non-Compensated Developers reveals that it has little value. The patent covenant only applies to software that you develop at home and keep for yourself; the promises don’t extend to others when you distribute. You cannot pass the rights to your downstream recipients, even to the maintainers of larger projects on which your contribution is built.

Running ASP.NET Applications in Debian and Ubuntu using XSP and Mono

Filed under
HowTos

Mono is an open-source project providing the necessary software to develop and run .NET client and server applications on Linux, Solaris, Mac OS X, Windows, and Unix. Monodevelop is probably the best IDE for developing .NET applications on Linux. In order to install and use it for development, you will also need the Mono .NET runtime environment installed.

Ubuntu Edgy 6.10 Clean Install Impressions

Filed under
Ubuntu

After my success upgrading from Ubuntu 6.06 to Edgy 6.10 I decided to reformat my hard drive and try doing a clean install. The whole install process went very smoothly and was an improvement over the Ubuntu 6.06 install.

Blogging made easy with Drivel

Filed under
Software

Most bloggers use a browser to log in and post new entries. The Drivel Journal Editor is designed for those who consider using a browser too tedious when making new blog entries. Designed for GNOME, Drivel can work with Blogger, LiveJournal, MovableType, WordPress, and other popular journaling tools. Despite an elegant yet simple interface, Drivel packs in some very useful features, such as an integrated spellcheker, HTML syntax highlighting, and the ability to edit and update past entries.

Jono Bacon: UDS nearly done

Filed under
Ubuntu

Well, the UDS finishes up tomorrow, and lots has been going on. The spec about unifying resources with Launchpad was very productive, and there was some discussion of it being rolled out for planets and user maps.

Weakly Debian Nudes #4

Filed under
Humor

Nothing happened this week. Sorry.

But that never stopped me before, so...

If Novell and Microsoft were in the car production and sales business...

Filed under
SUSE

Look at it this way for a moment: If I, as an end-user, bought a car from Ford, that does indeed contain technology infringing some patent owned by DaimlerChrysler -- would there by any likelyhood that Ford would sue me, the end-user? However, if I, as an end-user, buy a SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, that *may* contain (well, it doesn't, and never will, as Novell strongly reassures me) software patented technology owned by Microsoft -- would there be any likelyhood that Microsoft would sue me, the end-user?

How to find the owner of a Network or Domain to track down offenders

Filed under
HowTos

Sometime you need to track down offenders who are trying to attack against your services such as routers, mail, web server etc. In some cases you just wanted to find out who is sending traffic or hot linking your images etc.

Abit AW9D i975X

Filed under
Hardware

Abit's AW8 and AW8-MAX were exceptionally well-designed i955X motherboards, and Abit's latest attempt at a high-performance Intel LGA-775 solution is the AW9D series. We have the Abit AW9D on our test bench, which is backed by Intel's flagship 975X processor and boasts an arsenal of innovative features. But how does this product perform under GNU/Linux? We have all of the performance metrics to share today.

Open-source vendors seek help from Congress

Filed under
OSS

Open-source software vendors are prodding Congress to define some legal standards to support the development and deployment of such software.

Matt Asay: The GPL doesn't violate US antitrust law (Duh!)

Filed under
OSS

The verdict is in: The GPL, by driving license costs to zero, is not a violation of US antitrust (e.g., price fixing) law. Whew! I was worried for a minute there.

Open Source Indemnification: More Harm than Good

Filed under
OSS

Since SCO filed its lawsuit against IBM several years ago, a number of vendors have stepped forward to indemnify their customers from suit if the customer becomes embroiled in any litigation involving open source software that the vendor distributed.

Writer's Cafe Offers Novel Approach to Writing

Filed under
Software

As a fiction or novel writer, are you searching for a writing tool to help you harness your creativity and get down to efficiently developing your plot? You might have a cast of characters and need to incorporate several different sub-plots. Maybe you think in a non-linear fashion and need to get your million dollar manuscript done sometime this next... oh, I don't know... decade.

Perhaps you are a Linux user, too.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE/SUSE: SLES for SAP and Christian Boltz Introduced

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications support update
    SUSE has announced effective December 1, 2018, two changes to its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for SAP Applications product. SLES for SAP Applications now includes support for a given service pack for 4.5 years with the regular subscription while the basic codestream is general available and itself fully maintained. This change reflects the request from clients to align OS upgrades with hardware life cycles. To explain this a bit further, this change affects SLES for SAP Applications 12 and 15 code streams. SLES for SAP Applications 11 is at the end of the general availability already, therefore SLES for SAP Applications 11 SP4 is the last service pack. If clients choose to stay on SLES for SAP Applications 11, then they will need to purchase LTSS to ensure ongoing support. This is especially true for clients that run SAP HANA 1 workloads on IBM Power Systems servers in Big Endian mode.
  • 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Christian Boltz
    With two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

ArchLabs Refresh Release, 2019.01.20

Gidday ArchLabbers, Happy New Year. With the new year comes an ISO refresh. All changes are listed at the change-log. If you encounter any issues, please post them at the forum. Also, ArchLabs related bugs need to be raised at BitBucket. Read more

Programming: Homebrew 1.9, JBoss EAP, Python, Qt and Inclusion

  • Homebrew 1.9 Adds Linux Support, Auto-Cleanup, and More
    The latest release of popular macOS package manager Homebrew includes support for Linux, optional automatic package cleanup, and extended binary package support. Linux support, merged from the Linuxbrew project, is still in beta and will become stable in version 2.0. It also enables the use of Homebrew on Windows 10 systems with the Windows Subsystem for Linux installed. Auto-cleanup is meant to optimize disk space occupation by removing all intermediate data that Homebrew generates when installing packages. This can be a significant amount when Homebrew actually builds the packages from sources instead of just installing binaries. Auto-cleanup is opt-in by setting the HOMEBREW_INSTALL_CLEANUP. This behaviour will become opt-out in version 2.0, where you will be able to set the HOMEBREW_NO_INSTALL_CLEANUP environment variable to disable auto-cleanup.
  • Streamline your JBoss EAP dev environment with Red Hat CodeReady Workspaces: Part 1
  • Counteracting Code Complexity With Wily - Episode 195
    As we build software projects, complexity and technical debt are bound to creep into our code. To counteract these tendencies it is necessary to calculate and track metrics that highlight areas of improvement so that they can be acted on. To aid in identifying areas of your application that are breeding grounds for incidental complexity Anthony Shaw created Wily. In this episode he explains how Wily traverses the history of your repository and computes code complexity metrics over time and how you can use that information to guide your refactoring efforts.
  • Qt Visual Studio Tools 2.3.1 Released
    The Qt VS Tools version 2.3.1 has now been released to the Visual Studio Marketplace.
  • Ben Cotton: Inclusion is a necessary part of good coding
    Too often I see comments like “some people would rather focus on inclusion than write good code.” Not only is that a false dichotomy, but it completely misrepresents the relationship between the two. Inclusion doesn’t come at the cost of good code, it’s a necessary part of good code. We don’t write code for the sake of writing code. We write code for people to use it in some way. This means that the code needs to work for the people. In order to do that, the people designing and implementing the technology need to consider different experiences. The best way to do that is to have people with different experiences be on the team. As my 7th grade algebra teacher was fond of reminding us: garbage in, garbage out.

Graphics: Vega, Radeon, Wayland on BSD

  • Vega 10 & Newer Getting More Fine-Grained PowerPlay Controls On Linux
    With the upcoming Linux 5.1 kernel cycle, discrete Radeon graphics cards based on Vega 10 and newer will have fine-grained controls over what PowerPlay power management features are enabled and the ability to toggle them at run-time. Queued into the work-in-progress AMDGPU code for the eventual Linux 5.1 kernel cycle is now a ppfeatures for sysfs. This new "ppfeatures" file on sysfs will allow for querying the PowerPlay features state and toggling them individually. This includes features like GFXOFF (the ability to turn off the graphics engine when idling), automatic fan control, LED display for GPU activity, the dynamic power management state for the various blocks, and other features. Up to now the PowerPlay features couldn't be toggled individually but just a blanket enable/disable.
  • AMD Radeon 7 Will Have Day One Linux Support
    Linux gamers shouldn't see a repeat performance of the Radeon RX 590 situation.
  • Wayland Support On The BSDs Continuing To Improve
    While Wayland was designed on and for Linux systems, the BSD support for Wayland and the various compositors has continued improving particularly over the past year or so but it's still a lengthy journey. In a little more than one year, the FreeBSD Wayland support has been on a steady rise. It's looking like this year could even mark the KDE Wayland session for FreeBSD potentially getting squared away. Besides KDE, the GNOME Wayland work for FreeBSD has advanced a bit and is available in some FreeBSD Ports but there has been some complications around libinput and its Linux'isms. Details on the current state of Wayland-related components in FreeBSD is drafted at the FreeBSD Wiki.