Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 19 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Apple Veteran Named PayPal’s First Head of Open Source Software Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 7:09pm
Story Pico scopes now run Linux Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 7:07pm
Story Linux – The Top 5 Lightweight Distros of 2014 Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 7:03pm
Story Joyent Partners with Canonical on Customized Ubuntu as a Cloud Service Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 7:02pm
Story Teachers Romania oblivious about open source Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 6:54pm
Story Steam's Linux game count explodes in one year, big publishers still absent Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 6:18pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 5:43pm
Story Samsung leads Android pack in enterprise, but Lenovo looms Rianne Schestowitz 2 20/02/2014 - 9:55am
Story Displaying Upload Progress With nginx On Debian Wheezy falko 20/02/2014 - 9:06am
Story Plan 9 is open sauced Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 8:52am

Taking Puppy for a short walk

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Puppy 2.0 was released several days ago and I'd been quite anxious to find the time to look at it. This major release brings about some significant changes to the underlying code as well as some visible changes - most notably the mozilla-seamonkey suite and kernel 2.6.16.7.

Emacs tips: Making outlines

Filed under
HowTos

The ability to make outlines, or to view any structured document in an outline view, are touted features of Microsoft Word and just about every word processor out there. Linux has its ways here, too. The Vim editor has folding, and Emacs has Outline mode, which lets you selectively view documents by their main headings. You can hide and view the text under headings, move quickly between headings, and easily mark whole branches of the outline for cutting.

n/a

GIMP 2.3.9 Development Release

Filed under
Software

GIMP 2.3.9 is the latest and hopefully one of the last development snapshots on our way to version 2.4 of the GNU Image Manipulation Program. There are 28 notable changes in GIMP v2.3.9, not counting all of the bug fixes and code cleanup.

SUSE Linux 10.1 Live DVD Released

Filed under
SUSE

The SUSE Linux 10.1 Live DVD is available now. The Live DVD is a 32bit Intel-based system which contains 4 GB of great Linux software compressed into a 1.7 GB ISO.

Secure your email communication with free software

Filed under
HowTos

Email is one of the most common activities we perform on the internet. However, email is also one of the most vulnerable internet services currently used. In this article, you’ll learn how to install, setup, and use the Mozilla Thunderbird email client for secure, encrypted email using GnuPG and the Enigmail Mozilla Thunderbird extension.

My desktop OS: Zeta

Filed under
OS

In a world filled with alternative operating systems, sometimes you have to search for the best. Mac OS X? Nah. "Place name here" distribution of Linux? Nope. Zeta? Definitely. Zeta has all the power it needs to be my primary OS.

Build a Mail Server with FreeBSD, Part 1

Filed under
HowTos

In this Recipe, I'll show you how to build a mail server for your SMB clients using simple, commodity PC hardware, the FreeBSD operating system, and several pieces of freely available open-source software.

Linux? Windows? Huh?

Filed under
Ubuntu

This is not a gripe against windows. I use windows on a daily basis. I have also recently installed the latest release of Ubuntu Linux and have found that its ease of use is second to no other OS I’ve used as of yet.

Keep your private documents private

Filed under
HowTos

Nowadays, with more and more governmental censorship (and with it getting worse by the day, just look at Slashdot’s privacy section) and reports of hacking into major servers becoming almost a daily occurrence, we all want the maximum security and privacy possible online. Thankfully, some great free software projects have risen to the challenge! Here are some simple steps to keep your "stuff" safe:

Using the scenario feature in OpenOffice.org Calc

Filed under
HowTos

I've been there. We've all been there. You're sitting there in the third hour of a boring meeting, nibbling on the last doughnut and trying to figure out what your income and expenses would have to be to move to a small island in British Columbia and support yourself with your macrame skills. The common thread here is multiple scenarios.

Novell's Fight for Respect

Filed under
SUSE

In many ways, Novell is a lot like many other midsize software companies. All are struggling to reinvent themselves in a world where big deals are being won mainly by the likes of Oracle, IBM and SAP -- and where business models are being upended by such trends as open source and so-called "software as a service," where vendors make wares accessible over the Internet and rely more on monthly subscriptions than up-front license fees.

FVWM: How Styles are Applied

Filed under
HowTos

Configuring FVWM can seem like a chore at times. Indeed, there are certain aspects of it that are easy - and some that are less so. I've been helping people configure FVWM for some time now, and while I have delved into some of the more esoteric regions of FVWM, it seems that many people find the use of Style lines the hardest aspect to grasp. Hopefully this article will help clarify things.

5 things all new users to Ubuntu should know

Filed under
Ubuntu

This is the guide I wish I had that cold november morning 6 months ago when I installed Ubuntu for the first time.

How to suspend and hibernate a laptop under Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Many people prefer working with laptops instead of desktops for the flexibility they offer. Some of them would also like to switch to a free and open source operating system like GNU/Linux and have their laptop do all the things that proprietary OSes offer, such as suspending their laptops. Several distributions try to make this work out of the box, but knowing what's under the hood always comes in handy, particularly when something goes wrong and needs fixing. Let's take a look at how to suspend and hibernate your laptop under Linux.

Lenovo says yes to Linux

Filed under
Linux

Last week, the world's #3 computer vendor, Lenovo, was saying "We will not have models available for Linux, and we do not have custom order, either. What you see is what you get. And at this point, it's Windows." Whoops! Lenovo is now reversing its stance.

KOffice 2.0, The Vision

Filed under
KDE

KOffice is working on its future, one based on KDE4. KOffice is starting new initiatives with libraries like Flake and Pigment that are going to be used for all KOffice applications.

Running debootstrap in a non-Debian distro

Filed under
HowTos

Last week I wanted to install Debian on a chroot on my machine. Maybe there is an easier way to do this, but I will document what I did, just in case someone wants to do something similar.

Migrating mission-critical enterprise apps to Linux platforms: No big deal

Filed under
Linux

If you blinked, you may have missed it. At some time in the past year or two, the concept of moving to a Linux platform for mission-critical enterprise application suites, such as those from SAP, AG and Oracle Corp., ceased to be one rife with agony, stress and doubt.

serverResponse and light weight XML web services

Filed under
HowTos

With the latest GNU Telephony releases of GNU Bayonne, I have experimented with and introduced a new lightweight kind of XML based web service that I call serverResponse.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: ZDNet/CBS FUD, WiFi4EU, and Krack Wi-Fi

  • Open source web hosting software compromised with DDoS malware [Ed: CBS hired Catalin Cimpanu for him to have a broader platform with which to associate "Open Source" with security issues (does he say "proprietary" when it's proprietary, too?). Microsoft has long financed efforts to associate FOSS/copyleft with security issues and stigmatise it with licensing terror.]
  • Commission tried to hide details of 'WiFi4EU' glitch

    The European Commission has tried to hide information related to technical problems its free wifi fund portal suffered, by claiming that it was "out of scope".

    It released documents to EUobserver following an access to documents request - but heavily redacted some of the key papers.

    However, one of the documents has been leaked and published online. A comparison between the leaked version and the one released by the commission clearly shows that the commission went too far with its redactions.

  • The Flawed System Behind the Krack Wi-Fi Meltdown

    "If there is one thing to learn from this, it's that standards can't be closed off from security researchers," says Robert Graham, an analyst for the cybersecurity firm Erratasec. "The bug here is actually pretty easy to prevent, and pretty obvious. It's the fact that security researchers couldn't get their hands on the standards that meant that it was able to hide."

    The WPA2 protocol was developed by the Wi-Fi Alliance and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), which acts as a standards body for numerous technical industries, including wireless security. But unlike, say, Transport Layer Security, the popular cryptographic protocol used in web encryption, WPA2 doesn't make its specifications widely available. IEEE wireless security standards carry a retail cost of hundreds of dollars to access, and costs to review multiple interoperable standards can quickly add up to thousands of dollars.

Android Leftovers

OpenBSD: New Dnsmasq, New OpenSSH and New OpenBSD

FOSS in Digital Currencies

  • Braiins OS: An Open Source Alternative to Bitcoin Mining Firmware
    The company behind Slush Pool recently rolled out the initial release of its ASIC miner firmware: Braiins OS. The operating system is advertised as “the very first fully open-source, Linux-based system for cryptocurrency embedded devices,” an alternative to the factory-default firmware that comes with most popular mining hardware. Upon visiting the project’s website, visitors are greeted with a clear message, a mantra that resonates with its related industry’s ethos: “Take back control.”
  • Cryptoexchange Coinbase open sources its security scanner tool Salus
    The renowned United States-based cryptocurrency exchange, Coinbase always focuses on the security of its platform. Moreover, it has developed novel solutions to implementing security protocols to further strengthen their security. Furthermore, just recently, they announced that they are listing their security scanner execution tool, Salus as open source.
  • Crypto Exchange Coinbase Open-Sources Its Security Scaling Tool
    U.S.-based cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase is making a recently developed automated security scaling tool available to the public. Called Salus, after the Roman the goddess of safety and well-being, the program can automatically choose to run and configure different security scanners and issue a report on the results, according to a Thursday blog post from Coinbase developer Julian Borrey. Available as an open-source tool on GitHub from today, Salus is said to offer the advantage of being able to centrally coordinate security scans across a large number of software storage repositories, avoiding having to configure a scanner for each different project.