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Sunday, 23 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GnuCash Makes Money Management a Snap Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 10:29pm
Story CentOS Project Leader Karanbir Singh Opens Up on Red Hat Deal Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 10:13pm
Story Linux 3.14 Officializes Broadwell, Deprecates Legacy UMS Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 9:09pm
Story Raspberry Pi: 11 reasons why it's the perfect small server Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 9:03pm
Story Is CentOS ready for the Linux desktop? Rianne Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 8:54pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 4:46pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 1:11pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 1:10pm
Story CESG (UK Government): GNU/Linux the Most Secure Operating System; New Backdoors Released for Windows Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 1:01pm
Story Plasma and a new beginning Roy Schestowitz 16/01/2014 - 8:51am

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Google Summer of Code is underway

Filed under
Google

As of May 1, Google is now accepting applications from students. You've only got until May 8th to get them in, so you'd better get on it.

CLI Magic: Using script to log your sessions

Filed under
HowTos

Sometimes when working on a trivial task, such as creating a MySQL account, I find myself unable to remember the exact steps, despite having done it many times in the past few years. When such temporary amnesia strikes, you can turn to script, a command-line utility that keeps a log of your console session. It can record for future reference all the commands you use.

Building an updated Fedora Core 5 DVD

Filed under
HowTos

One of the things which has always ticked me off is making a clean fedora install, and then having hundreds of megs of patches to download the first time "yum update" is run. However, building a patched install dvd is actually pretty simple.

Introducing LKM programming Part I

Filed under
HowTos

This is the first part of a series of articles regarding Linux Kernel Modules. In this series we will see some examples of module programming and some techniques and general rules that we must keep in mind when we work in kernel mode.

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Napster returns to free, limited music

Filed under
Web

In a bid to bolster the image of its music subscription service and lure new subscribers, Napster is returning to the days of yore by offering free music. The free web-based offering utilizes Flash, presenting the user with a basic player application, a window for album art, and another for advertising. It works for Windows, Macintosh, and Linux.

Add Mailfiltering to the Falko howto Postfix Guide

Filed under
HowTos

The Falko guide shows us how to get Virtual users working with Postfix/ Courier IMAP however it would be nice to offer per user mail filtering on email marked as spam by Spam Assasin for example to go into a SPAM folder for example. In this guide, you will learn how to get around some of the security policies that Postfix affords in favour of quickness and speed.

Toll Lane Ahead for Internet Traffic?

Filed under
Web

At issue is the concept of net neutrality, which holds that operators cannot give preferential treatment to content or applications in which they have an interest and that users have a right to use the Internet in a nondiscriminatory, unrestricted fashion.

Designing a database-driven PHP App? Don't Forget the Data!!

Filed under
Software

If you have a sourceforge account, and are on your way to becoming the best thing to happen to the web since Yahoo or Google, then I beg of you to put a call out for people who understand database design fundamentals.

GP2X 2.0.0 Firmware

Filed under
Gaming

The GP2X open-source Linux-based gaming handheld with a dash of SDL and some Star Truckers (which is one of the finest open-source games I've played in months) has a new firmware version 2.0.0 out.

Open enterprise: Schwartz doesn't get Linux

Filed under
Misc

Scott McNealy is out. Jonathan Schwartz is in. And the future never looked brighter for Sun Microsystems—or so we're told. But if Sun's new CEO is going to convince me that his company can remain a dominant player in enterprise software, first he's going to have to get his story straight, particularly when it comes to Linux and open source.

Also: Interview with Jonathan Schwartz

Firefox 1.5.0.4 download location

Filed under
Moz/FF

I again point you to a new version of firefox before it becomes official. The version installed without problem over 1.5.0.2, all extensions that I have installed are still working.

X2: The Threat has gone gold

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Game Publishing just announced that their port of Egosoft's space simulation X2: The Threat has gone gold!

Also: Quetoo 0.3.4 has been released

mount --bind

Filed under
HowTos

One problem with symbolic links is that really they are just files. A special kind of file, yes, but a symlink only points at a directory - it doesn't act like one. So, for example, if you put a symlink to /xyz in a users home directory, and the user has write permission to his home (as he ordinarily would), he can remove your symlink. Nothing you can do with ordinary permissions can prevent that.

Xen in action: Deploying multiple servers

Filed under
Software

This article briefly examines the current state of affairs for multiple server deployment, with an emphasis on modern advancements in virtual servers and workstations. The most common configurations use three primary techniques: Partition, Emulate and Virtualize.

Setting a working directory for an app

Filed under
HowTos

A reader asked a hint for setting a a working directory for applications launched with WINE, because... "Some Windows programs require the setting of a working directory when the program is started."

Linux is not 'free' - it just works well

Filed under
Linux

The compelling reason for Linux's successful incubation and adoption is quite simple: it works for us. Linux meets two key requirements of technically mature enterprise consumers - reliability and portability.

Restoring Files From an Amanda Tape Backup

Filed under
HowTos

I've used the University of Maryland's open source Amanda tape backup system for some time now. There is some documentation on restoring entire disks or partitions with Amanda, but restoring individual files from tape or image file wasn't that intuitive, so I thought I'd share my experiences.

Monitoring nginx Server Statistics With rrdtool

Filed under
HowTos

Few days ago I have installed nginx on one of our adult projects as reverse proxy server and for static files management. Yesterday this server got 200Mbit/sec traffic and because all admins like to create miscellaneous graphs, I have decided to draw nginx stats on graphs to see server load not only in megabits and load averages. As the result, I have created perl script, which uses RRDs perl module to create and manage rrd-database and very beautiful graphs.

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More in Tux Machines

LAS 2018

  • LAS 2018
    This month I was at my second Libre Application Summit in Denver. A smaller event than GUADEC but personally was my favorite conference so far. One of the main goals of LAS has been to be a place for multiple platforms to discuss the desktop space and not just be a GNOME event. This year two KDE members, @aleixpol and Albert Astals Cid, who spoke about release cycle of KDE Applications, Plasma, and the history of Qt. It is always interesting to see how another project solves the same problems and where there is overlap. The elementary folks were there since this is @cassidyjames home turf who had a great “It’s Not Always Techincal” talk as well as a talk with @danrabbit about AppCenter which are both very important areas the GNOME Project needs to improve in. I also enjoyed meeting a few other community members such as @Philip-Scott and talk about their use of elementary’s platform.
  • Developer Center Initiative – Meeting Summary 21st September
    Since last blog post there’s been two Developer Center meetings held in coordination with LAS GNOME Sunday the 9th September and again Friday the 21st September. Unfortunately I couldn’t attend the LAS GNOME meeting, but I’ll cover the general progress made here.

The "Chinese EPYC" Hygon Dhyana CPU Support Still Getting Squared Away For Linux

Back in June is when the Linux kernel patches appeared for the Hygon Dhyana, the new x86 processors based on AMD Zen/EPYC technology licensed by Chengdu Haiguang IC Design Co for use in Chinese data-centers. While the patches have been out for months, they haven't reached the mainline kernel quite yet but that might change next cycle. The Hygon Dyhana Linux kernel patches have gone through several revisions and the code is mostly adapting existing AMD Linux kernel code paths for Zen/EPYC to do the same on these new processors. While these initial Hygon CPUs appear to basically be re-branded EPYC CPUs, the identifiers are different as rather than AMD Family 17h, it's now Family 18h and the CPU Vendor ID is "HygonGenuine" and carries a new PCI Express device vendor ID, etc. So the different areas of the kernel from CPUFreq to KVM/Xen virtualization to Spectre V2 mitigations had to be updated for the correct behavior. Read more

Good Support For Wayland Remote Desktop Handling On Track For KDE Plasma 5.15

The KDE Plasma 5.15 release due out next year will likely be in good shape for Wayland remote desktop handling. The KDE Plasma/KWin developers have been pursuing Wayland remote desktop support along a similar route to the GNOME Shell camp by making use of PipeWire and the XDG-Desktop-Portal. Bits are already in place for KDE Plasma 5.13 and the upcoming 5.14 release, but for the 5.15 release is now where it sounds like the support may be in good shape for end-users. Read more

Linux developers threaten to pull “kill switch”

Linux powers the internet, the Android in your pocket, and perhaps even some of your household appliances. A controversy over politics is now seeing some of its developers threatening to withdraw the license to all of their code, potentially destroying or making the whole Linux kernel unusable for a very long time. Read more