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Saturday, 23 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Creating a Wiki with kwiki

Filed under
HowTos

Wikis are simple interactive websites which are extremely easy to use for storing easily updated text content. Debian has packaged several different Wiki systems and here we'll look at installing just one of them: KWiki.

Why Do They Want My Phone Number?

Filed under
Security

On the checkout line this holiday season, make sure you have everything on your gift list, your cash or credit card ready -- and, oh yeah, get set for one more thing.

"Can I have your phone number, please?"

Where Computer Interfaces Are Going : 3D Beyond Games

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Will we be stuck with flat rectangles on our desktop forever or will we finally live in a 3D desktop? This article discusses some alternatives and proposes a framework in which future interface designs may be evaluated.

High-tech gift ideas, items in wee sizes, at tiny prices

Filed under
Misc

Ask your favorite techies what they want for the holidays, and they'll probably suggest a 50-inch plasma television, the hottest Windows laptop or a 60-gigabyte iPod.

Hackers find first Xbox 360 cracks

Filed under
Gaming

Only weeks after the introduction of the Xbox 360, hackers appear to have cracked their way into the software that runs the Microsoft game console.

Classic Doom with New Tech

Filed under
Gaming

Wish you could relive the glory days playing the original Doom but with all the flair of a modern graphics engine? Well, thanks to the folks over at Flaming Sheep Software, you can!

Enterprise Unix Roundup: What's Driving Mandriva?

Filed under
MDV

Even before you open the door, you can sometimes tell how urgent the person on the other side wants to talk to you. A quiet knock is polite, well-mannered. A harder knock communicates more of a desire to hurry up, let's get this open so we can talk.

Then there's Mandriva. They kicked the door in this week.

The Voice of IP: Open Source and the Traditional Business Model -- Can They Be Buddies?

Filed under
OSS

Something that has become really noticeable is the prominence of Asterisk (the open source PBX) in the telecoms media and at telephony shows. It is not just the high profile presence of Asterisk, but it is the growing number of other companies who have products based on Asterisk that is truly staggering.

SETI@Home project ends; no E.T., but the technology continues

Filed under
Web

Along with the Howard Stern Show, another radio endeavor involving alien life forms is going off the air this week; SETI@Home, a grid supercomputer project for detecting signs of extra terrestrial life from deep space, officially ended Dec. 15.

Music Labels Sue More File-Sharers

Filed under
Legal

The Recording Industry Association of America has filed a new round of lawsuits against people who share unauthorized copies of music over P-to-P services, the trade group announced Thursday.

ODF: The Better, More Affordable Office Standard?

Filed under
Misc

Opinion: If you take a close look, as many people have, it's clear that ODF, and not Open XML, is the better document standard.

Test Your Advanced SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9 Skills

Filed under
SUSE

The 30 exercises found in this sample chapter from Sam's allow you to test your knowledge with SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9 at an advanced level.

Intel vs. AMD: An Epic Continues

Filed under
Hardware

For years, Intel Corp. and Advanced Micro Devices Inc. have battled each other in the x86-based microprocessor business. Nows they've taken it to the courtroom. See what happened in 2005...and what's next.

Windows, Linux tussle with Unix

Filed under
OS

Shivani Shinde delves into the enterprise software market where 64-bit offerings from Microsoft, Red Hat and Novell are starting to take on commercial Unix.

Sun Pushes for Greater Adoption of OpenDocument Format

Filed under
OSS

People want to be able to store their information for the long term without having to continually pay to upgrade their document software to maintain this or be forced to accept the alternative.

At the Sounding Edge: Music Notation Software for Linux, Part 3

Filed under
HowTos

In this month's stop on our tour of Linux music notation programs, we look at the MusiXTeX music typesetting software. MusiXTeX was created by Daniel Taupin, Ross Mitchell and Andreas Egler. MusiXTeX currently is maintained by Christian Mondrup and other volunteers.

Book Review: Beyond the C++ Standard Library

Filed under
Reviews

This is not an easy book. It is not a volume for beginners. But if you are willing to work your way through the code, this will make you a far better C++ programmer. It will also give you a better understanding of the ways you can manage objects.

KDE Dot News: Sponsored by OSU Open Source Lab on Gentoo

Filed under
KDE
Gentoo

I'm happy to announce that KDE Dot News is now fully hosted and supported by the OSU Open Source Lab. OSUOSL server hosting has been provided to us in the form of a Xen virtual machine running Gentoo Linux. I must say I am truly impressed by the combination. I've never used Gentoo before but I am finding it to be a well thought out distribution. Everything just works and it has some nice touches out-of-the-box such a colorised bash shell.

IBM opens up high-performance file system

Filed under
OSS

IBM Corp has begun licensing its General Parallel File System, GPFS, to third parties, with Linux supercomputing specialist Linux Networx Inc the first to use the high-performance file system technology.

Run Your Own Web Server Using Linux & Apache

Filed under
Linux

SitePoint Pty. Ltd., provider of fun, practical and easy-to-understand content for Web professionals, today announced the release of ‘Run Your Own Web Server Using Linux & Apache’.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent
    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.
  • Market value of open source skills on the up
    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.
  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27
    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand. Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud
    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform. And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.
  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source
    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more