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Sunday, 18 Nov 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Pluto: And then there were eight

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Pluto has just been demoted. The celestial body, long known as one of the nine planets of the solar system, will now be considered a "dwarf planet," the General Assembly of the 2006 International Astronomical Union ruled in a vote Thursday in Prague, Czech Republic. Textbook makers grapple with Pluto demotion.

New NVIDIA Display Driver Released

Filed under
Software

Version: 1.0-8774
Operating Systems: Linux IA32, AMD64/EM64T, FreeBSD x86, Solaris x64/x86

Release Highlights
*Added support for X.Org 7.1.

Tips on keeping your Ubuntu Linux server secure

Filed under
Ubuntu

As a system administrator, one of your chief tasks is dealing with server security. If your server is connected to the Internet, for security purposes, it's in a war zone. If it's only an internal server, you still need to deal with (accidentally) malicious users, disgruntled employees and the guy in accounting who really wants to read the boss's secretary's e-mail.

Open-source stack providers getting squeezed?

Filed under
OSS

Pure-play open-source software providers are being squeezed out of the enterprise market by increasingly complete offerings from application and OS providers, according to a report from The 451 Group's just-launched "Commercial Adoption of Open Source" (CAOS) service. The report's findings may be applicable to embedded Linux stack providers, as well.

SUSE Linux Goes Desi

Filed under
SUSE

Novell India today announced that the award-winning SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 and some of the key applications that run on the desktop operating system (OS) have been localized with support in five major languages namely Hindi, Bangla, Tamil, Gujarati, and Marathi.

Ubuntu update becomes terminal pain

Filed under
Ubuntu

Many users of the increasingly popular Ubuntu Linux distribution found themselves on Tuesday thrown back to mid-1990s, when a botched update to the graphical X Window subsystem brought them face-to-face with the command-line terminal.

Marathon: RubiconX

Filed under
Gaming

Rubicon X is a free, cross platform, first person shooter that continues the story of Bungie’s Marathon trilogy. First released as Marathon:Rubicon in 2001, Rubicon X is a complete overhaul of the original.

Mounting things in multiple locations

Filed under
HowTos

We recently saw it is possible to install Debian via debootstrap, and this works nicely for most things. However if you were to boot a system using Knoppix, or similar, you'll soon realise that guide isn't complete - your new system has no kernel installed and is also missing a bootloader. How do we fix this?

How to set up a home web server or photo gallery in 5 Minutes

Filed under
HowTos

It seems like everybody's blogging and sharing digital photos online. Do you like gallery tools such as Flickr, but want to control your photos, or get rid of any of their limits? Now you can have your own custom gallery using PHP, a script called Picy, and 5 minutes of your time!

Hands on: Understanding Dapper Drake

Filed under
Ubuntu

After a short delay, Ubuntu 6.06 (Dapper Drake) was released in June. Originally scheduled for mid-April, the developers decided to let the date slip six weeks to allow for concentrated bug fixing and some final polishing.

[Debian Sarge] Installing A Bind9 Master/Slave DNS System

Filed under
HowTos

In this howto we will install 2 bind dns servers, one as the master and the other as a slave server. For security reasons we will chroot bind9 in its own jail. Using two servers for a domain is a commonly used setup and in order to host your own domain you are required to have at least 2 domain servers.

Curiousity Draws 200 To Enterprise Linux Roadshow

Filed under
SUSE

In a sign that Novell's new lease on life is garnering interest, some 200 people attended the Sydney leg of Novell's national Suse Linux Enterprise roadshow today.

Kickstart your Linux security by avoiding garbage installations

Filed under
Linux

Recently, a colleague complained to me that X Windows refused to start following a routine patch upgrade on a production Web server. I asked why he needed X Windows running on a production Web server in the first place, especially a server that was allegedly secured as a bastion host in a perimeter DMZ. The response that "it was installed by default" seemed inadequate when considering the security risk posed by running X Windows on a bastion host.

How to amp up the Linux kernel

Filed under
HowTos

Vanilla is boring. Though it is, usually, at least stable. One of the inherent beauties of open-source software — philosophical, developmental, and future-of-the-human-race issues aside — is simply that you can play with it. And there is no more an exciting area to play in than the Linux kernel.

KPhotoAlbum Splash Screen Contest

Filed under
KDE

Several times people have complained that the KPhotoAlbum splash screen was a combination of ugly, ugly and non relating to KPhotoAlbum. So far I've managed to tell people to go and take a hike, but today I gave up and I started a contest to make a new splash screen for KPhotoAlbum.

Gentoo Weekly Newletter

Filed under
Gentoo

Some interesting things are found in this week's Gentoo Weekly Newletter. We are briefed on the Gentoo booth happenings at last week's Linux Expo, GCC 4.1.1 and glibc 2.4 are going stable, and an interview at Lxer.com is highlighted. This and more in this week's Gentoo Weekly Newsletter.

Migrating from shadow passwords to tcb in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Shadow passwords have been a de facto standard with Linux distributions for years, and as well as the use of md5 passwords. However, there are drawbacks to using the traditional shadow password method, and even md5 is not as secure as it used to be. There is an alternative to shadow called tcb.

Review: Which Free Linux Desktop Is Best?

Filed under
Linux

CRN Test Center set out to locate good examples of free Linux distributions that still have some channel focus and offer robust features, along with upgrades to commercial support. The field was narrowed down to three familiar names in the Linux world, Ubuntu, OpenSuse and the new Freespire.

To choose or not to choose....

Filed under
Linux

One of the complaints I often hear from users new to Linux is the seemingly endless choices available. I'll admit it is confusing when you are presented with 10 browsers, editors, or email programs. And wouldn't it be great if there were only one way to install applications across all distributions! With out a doubt, it would significantly increase the usability of Linux, in general, if everyone used a best of breed installation process.

How to turn off the annoying system beep in linux (Debian/Ubuntu)

Filed under
HowTos

If you’re like me, you start getting real annoyed, real fast at the system beep that insists on beeping far to often. This system beep emits not from your laptop speakers, but from that deep, dank recesses of ancient pc technology that is a little speaker designed only to beep annoyingly. Short of ripping it out, here’s how to disable it.

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KDE: This week in Usability & Productivity and KBibTeX's Latest

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 45
    Let’s have a bit more Usability & Productivity, shall we? The KDE Applications 18.12 release is right around the corner, and we got a lot of great improvements to some core KDE apps–some for that upcoming release, and some for the next one. And lots of other things too, of course!
  • Running KBibTeX from Git repository has become easier
    A common problem with bug reports received for KBibTeX is that the issue may already be fixed in the latest master in Git or that I can provide a fix which gets submitted to Git but then needs to be tested by the original bug reporter to verify that the issue has been indeed fixed for good. For many distributions, no ‘Git builds’ are available (or the bug reporter does not know if they exist or how to get them installed) or the bug reporter does not know how to fetch the source code, compile it, and run KBibTeX, despite the (somewhat too technical) documentation. Therefore, I wrote a Bash script called run-kbibtex.sh which performs all the necessary (well, most) steps to get from zero to a running KBibTeX. The nicest thing is that all files (cloned Git repo, compiled and installed KBibTeX) are placed inside /tmp which means no root or sudo are required, nor are any permanent modifications made to the user&aposs system.

FreeBSD 12.0-RC1 Released, Fixes Ryzen 2 Temperature Reporting

Arguably most user-facing with this week's FreeBSD 12.0-RC1 release is updating the amdsmn/amdtemp drivers for attaching to Ryzen 2 host bridges. Additionally, the amdtemp driver has been fixed for correctly reporting the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX core temperature. The 2990WX temperature reporting is the same fix Linux initially needed to for a 27 degree offset to report the correct temperature. It's just taken FreeBSD longer to add Ryzen 2 / Threadripper 2 temperature bits even though they had beat the Linux kernel crew with the initial Zen CPU temperature reporting last year. Read more Also: MeetBSD 2018: Michael W Lucas Why BSD?

GPU/Graphics: DRM/KMS and CUDA

  • Google's Pixel 3 Is Using The MSM DRM Driver, More Android Phones Moving To DRM/KMS Code
    It turns out Google's recently announced Pixel 3 smartphone is making use of the MSM Direct Rendering Manager driver associated with the Freedreno open-source Qualcomm graphics project. Google is also getting more Android vendors moving over to using DRM/KMS drivers to power their graphics/display. Alistair Strachan of Google presented at this week's Linux Plumbers Conference and the growing adoption of Direct Rendering Manager / Kernel Mode-Setting drivers by Android devices.
  • Red Hat Developers Working Towards A Vendor-Neutral Compute Stack To Take On NVIDIA's CUDA
    At this week's Linux Plumbers Conference, David Airlie began talking about the possibility of a vendor-neutral compute stack across Intel, Radeon, and NVIDIA GPU platforms that could potentially take on NVIDIA's CUDA dominance. There has been the work on open-source NVIDIA (Nouveau) SPIR-V compute support all year and that's ongoing with not yet having reached mainline Mesa. That effort has been largely worked on by Karol Herbst and Rob Clark, both open-source GPU driver developers at Red Hat. There has also been other compute-motivated open-source driver/infrastructure work out of Red Hat like Jerome Glisse's ongoing kernel work around Heterogeneous Memory Management (HMM). There's also been the Radeon RADV driver that Red Hat's David Airlie co-founded and continues contributing significantly to its advancement. And then there has been other graphics/compute contributions too with Red Hat remaining one of the largest upstream contributors to the ecosystem.

Endless OS Switching To The BFQ I/O Scheduler For More Responsive Linux Desktop

While Con Kolivas' kernel patch series decided to do away with BFQ support, the GNOME-aligned Endless OS Linux distribution has decided to do the opposite in move from CFQ as the default I/O scheduler over to BFQ. Endless OS has decided to switch to the BFQ (Budget Fair Queuing) I/O scheduler since it prioritizes interactive workloads and should make for a better experience for its users particularly when applications may be upgrading in the background. During heavy background I/O, Endless found that their launch time of LibreOffice went from taking 16 seconds with CFQ to just three seconds when using BFQ. Other tests were also positive for improving the interactivity/responsiveness of the system particularly during heavy background I/O. Read more