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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story It's an ideal time to have Linux skills, SUSE exec says srlinuxx 05/04/2013 - 12:37am
Story Sorting Out the Linux Desktop Mess srlinuxx 04/04/2013 - 11:21pm
Story Humble Weekly Sale surprises with AAA Titles srlinuxx 04/04/2013 - 4:52pm
Story What Is Our Goal Here? srlinuxx 04/04/2013 - 4:46pm
Story MATE 1.6 supports systemd login srlinuxx 04/04/2013 - 4:42pm
Story Chakra: A Simple, Strong Energy Center for Your Desktop srlinuxx 03/04/2013 - 9:23pm
Story New major release of Linux Video Disk Recorder srlinuxx 03/04/2013 - 9:22pm
Story Analysts unleash the bears on Red Hat srlinuxx 03/04/2013 - 9:20pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 03/04/2013 - 9:12pm
Story Linux schisms are a blessing in disguise srlinuxx 03/04/2013 - 1:53am

Flexibility - the Core of Open Source

Filed under
OSS

There is a recent thread on LKML that I think is interesting enough, I wanted to highlight it for you, in case you hadn't seen it. Linus' comments, part of which were also posted by Matt Asay on Infoworld, stand on their own, but the general topic is design choice. What matters most? Design focus or user configurability? Can you have both?

Google trumps Microsoft by taking $1.4b AOL stake

Filed under
Misc

Google has agreed to pay US$1 billion ($1.45 billion) for 5 per cent of Time Warner's America Online unit, shutting out rival bidder Microsoft, said a source familiar with the discussions. "It's a pre-emptive move against Microsoft."

Kororaa - Revisited

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Almost a month ago I attempted an install of Gentoo using Kororaa and it didn't quite go as hoped. About a week ago Chris, of Kororaa, writes to mention that he released Beta2-r1. He stated that he was finally able to find a machine that would reproduce my error and thought he had fixed it. He asked if I could test it, and I apologize for the delay, but today I finally did. So, what happened this time?

Author Robin Miller discusses OOo 2.0

Filed under
Software

Author Robin Miller was online Friday, Dec. 16th to discuss the OpenOffice.org suite of office productivity software and his new book "Point and Click: OpenOffice.org."

Linux Tutorial: The Shell

Filed under
HowTos

With the modernization and creation of a lot of newer GUI-based tools, the shell is becoming increasingly un-required to perform many tasks. But the shell is a very powerful place, and a lot is achieved through it.

People Behind KDE: Debian Qt/KDE Packagers

Filed under
KDE

A special treat on tonight's People Behind KDE as we bring you the Debian Qt KDE Packagers. A whole seven interviews in one!

Why Some Linux News Sites Aren't Succeeding

Filed under
Web

I always hate it when a Linux "news" website publishes things that aren't news. It would be like having a hosting website that doesn't do hosting...what's the point really?

Survey: Evil Geniuses Less Interested In World Domination

Filed under
Humor

Facing growing expenses and a lack of motivation, many of the world's leading evil geniuses and conspirators are no longer plotting world domination, according to a new survey conducted by the US Census Bureau.

Gaim 2.0.0beta1 Available

Filed under
Software

We've released Gaim 2.0.0beta1. We're looking for lots of feedback on this release--especially what you love about it and what you hate about it.

GOOGLE'S First Big Failure

Filed under
Web

There was a huge rush to sign up for Google Analytics when it was first announced a few weeks ago. The Google search engine is widely believed to be the best on the Web. Google Gmail was a smash hit. So why does Google Analytics suck?

Also: Oops! Everybody but Google is Case-Sensitive?!

Bruce Perens' Forecasts for 2006

Filed under
Misc
  • Trouble ahead for PHP

  • Java begins its decline as an Enterprise Platform
  • Native Linux APIs gain ground as a Cellular Applications Platform

Firefox browser enters mainstream

Filed under
Moz/FF

The Firefox Web browser hit a milestone recently with the release of version 1.5 in Mac, Windows and Linux flavors. It has graduated from its hacker roots and turned into a powerful, fast and easily customizable browser that anyone can use.

Apache 2.2.0: Should I Stay or Should I Go?

Filed under
Software

Apache 2.2.0 is major release of the Apache httpd server and includes a number of critical changes. This article will cover some of the specific elements that have changed (with examples and alternative configurations) as well as discuss when to upgrade to the new version and when to wait for a future revision.

Kat Continues to Purrrr

Filed under
Linux
-s

Kat is purring louder than ever, and folks are hearing. Not long ago Kat was a new technology brought to my attention by being included in a beta of the last Mandriva release. Not much later I interviewed Roberto Cappuccio and found out much more about him and his exciting project. Recently an article by Roberto was published in one of the largest Linux magazines in existence today. Now Robert Cappuccio celebrates a new site, a new logo and fund raiser.

Running Linux - Fifth Edition

Filed under
Reviews

If you have a passing interesting Linux or if you're a seasoned veteran, you like Running Linux Fifth Edition . It's not only a good book to read, it's an excellent reference.

It pays to be a Novell exec

Filed under
SUSE
Misc

According to the press release, "During the fourth fiscal quarter 2005, Novell recognized Linux platform revenue of $61 million, which was up 418 percent from the year ago quarter." Sounds impressive, doesn't it?

FSM: On free vs. proprietary

Filed under
Software

There is currently a competition going on between two types of business model. Each have their strong advocates, supporters and enemies. Flame wars have raised the temperature of various communication channels. In short, it's good old fashioned fun for all and sundry.

SUSE 10.1 Alpha 4 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

OpenSuSE's SUSE Linux 10.1 alpha4 was released right on schedule December 15 and as usual those developers have been hard at work. No big visual changes, but plenty under-the-hood serve as testament to their dedication. Again some key features this release include superior performance, unparalleled stability, and unrivaled software availability. Weelll, almost...

Digging Distributed Journalism: Digg.com

Filed under
Web

For those of you who haven't heard about Digg, it's a news site that relies on its readers to determine what the most important news stories are that day. In this interview, Kevin and Jay talk in depth about Digg, it's history, why Digg works, and Digg's international aspirations, and where Digg is going in the future.

Linux--The Teenage Years

Filed under
Linux

For seasoned IT citizens (i.e., senior managers and executives) it must be quite a show. Many can sit back and say, "Yup, I remember my AT&T Unix teen years. They were wild and exciting, but we sure are glad we got through them alive."

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent
    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.
  • Market value of open source skills on the up
    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.
  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27
    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand. Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud
    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform. And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.
  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source
    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more