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Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Mozilla: Code of Conduct, Kelly Davis, Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions

  • ow We’re Making Code of Conduct Enforcement Real — and Scaling it
    This is the first line of our Community Participation Guidelines — and an nudge to keep empathy at center when designing response processes. Who are you designing for? Who is impacted? What are their needs, expectations, dependencies, potential bias and limitations?
  • Role Models in AI: Kelly Davis
    Meet Kelly Davis, the Manager/Technical Lead of the machine learning group at Mozilla. His work at Mozilla includes developing an open speech recognition system with projects like Common Voice and Deep Speech (which you can help contribute to). Beyond his passion for physics and machine learning, read on to learn about how he envisions the future of AI, and advice he offers to young people looking to enter the field.
  • Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions
    While the world celebrates athletic excellence, we’re taking a moment to share some of the amazing Internet champions that help build, support and share Firefox.

Canonical Ubuntu 2017 milestones, a year in the rulebook

So has Canonical been breaking rules with Ubuntu is 2017, or has it in been writing its own rulebook? Back in April we saw an AWS-tuned kernel of Ubuntu launched, the move to cloud is unstoppable, clearly. We also saw Ubuntu version 17.04 released, with Unity 7 as the default desktop environment. This release included optimisations for environments with low powered graphics hardware. Read more Also: Ubuntu will let upgraders ‘opt-in’ to data collection in 18.04

The npm Bug

  • ​Show-stopping bug appears in npm Node.js package manager
    Are you a developer who uses npm as the package manager for your JavaScript or Node.js code? If so, do not -- I repeat do not -- upgrade to npm 5.7.0. Nothing good can come of it. As one user reported, "This destroyed 3 production servers after a single deploy!" So, what happened here? According to the npm GitHub bug report, "By running sudo npm under a non-root user (root users do not have the same effect), filesystem permissions are being heavily modified. For example, if I run sudo npm --help or sudo npm update -g, both commands cause my filesystem to change ownership of directories such as /etc, /usr, /boot, and other directories needed for running the system. It appears that the ownership is recursively changed to the user currently running npm."
  • Botched npm Update Crashes Linux Systems, Forces Users to Reinstall
    A bug in npm (Node Package Manager), the most widely used JavaScript package manager, will change ownership of crucial Linux system folders, such as /etc, /usr, /boot. Changing ownership of these files either crashes the system, various local apps, or prevents the system from booting, according to reports from users who installed npm v5.7.0. —the buggy npm update.

Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux Performance For Early 2018

Back in December was our most recent round of Windows Subsystem for Linux benchmarking with Windows 10 while since then both Linux and Windows have received new stable updates, most notably for mitigating the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks looking at the Windows 10 WSL performance against Linux using the latest updates as of this week while also running some comparison tests too against Docker on Windows and Oracle VM VirtualBox. Read more

KDE DCop DoS Vulnerability prior to 3.4

Filed under
KDE
Security

Sebastian Krahmer has reported a vulnerability in KDE, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

The vulnerability is caused due to an error in the authentication process in the DCOP (Desktop Communication Protocol) daemon dcopserver. This can be exploited to lock the dcopserver for arbitrary local users. Successful exploitation may result in decreased desktop functionality for the affected user.

The vulnerability has been reported in versions prior to 3.4.

Solution: Upgrade to KDE 3.4 or apply patch.

Click for more information and links to patches.

Original information on dot.kde.org.

US cyber-security 'nearly failing'

Filed under
Security

Cyber-security in the US is "nearly failing" and has been given a "must try harder" D+ rating by the Federal government.

The US Office of Management and Budget set forth cyber-security standards in the Federal Security Management Act 2002, encouraging federal agencies to tighten their IT systems.

KDE 3.4 Unleashed

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
-s

Defined as a network transparent contemporary desktop environment for UNIX workstations similar to the desktop environments found under the MacOS or Microsoft Windows, KDE provides an easy-to-use highly customizable integrated graphical interface for today's most demanding tasks. These include email communication, newsgroup participaton, web surfing, instant messaging, graphic design and manipulation, multimedia capabilities thru audio and video applications, system monitoring, file managing, and even software package handling. Today we will look at the latest incarnation.

EPA Honors AMD with ENERGY STAR Certificate

Filed under
Hardware

AMD today announced that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) awarded AMD's Cool'n'Quiet(TM) technology with an ENERGY STAR(R) Certificate of Recognition for advancing computer energy efficiency. All AMD Athlon(TM) 64 desktop processors have the innovative Cool'n'Quiet technology, a system-level feature that lowers the power consumption of a computer whenever maximum performance is not needed. AMD received the certificate on March 15 in conjunction with the 2005 ENERGY STAR Awards Ceremony in Washington, D.C.

Open Source - the next big opportunity for consulting firms?

Filed under
OSS

Could Open Source prove to be the next big money-maker for the world's consulting giants? To date only IBM has really got behind open source, so there could be quite a "land grab" in the coming year as more firms seize its potential. Mick James, former Editor of Management Consultancy magazine, speaks with the executive director of the Open Source Consortium to find out more.

Linux drives Renault Formula 1

Filed under
Linux
Sci/Tech

The Renault Formula 1 team is running simulations and crucial telemetry applications on Linux clusters from IBM, and it's pleased with the results.

The IT team behind the Renault Formula 1 team has dramatically cut the time it takes to test new features by using Linux, Renault said on Tuesday.

PCLinuxOS reviewed in Linuxformat

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

The March 2005 issue of Linux Format (a British Linux mag also online at www.linuxformat.co.uk) has a comparison of "PCLinux OS v. Knoppix," pages 26-27, by David Coulsen. He gives PCLOS 7 of 10 stars, versus Knoppix's 10/10. While PCLOS gets a generally positive review, Coulsen says,

It's hitting the mirrors folks.

Filed under
KDE

KDE 3.4 scheduled to be released on March 16 is making it's way onto mirrors as planned. It is still not officially announced yet, but stay tuned. Mirrors should be fairly complete by morning. We will mostly likely get the go-ahead by then.

Please stop by the old homestead here tomorrow for a review and of course plenty of beautiful default and customized screenshots from little ole me in my gallery as well.

Windows Media Player Digital Rights Management Spy

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

This is something really nasty in the XP filing system... it's in Windows Media Player, and it not only has all the information about Digital Rights Management, it also has all the information about your local police force..... QED... Not only is microsoft spying on you, they are also telling the cops what you have got on your system....

lego rubick’s cube robot

Filed under
Sci/Tech

correct me if i’m wrong, but technology was supposed to make our lives easier, take care of us, make us dinner, raise our children, and, fulfill our every dream.

so what has technology done for you lately? nothing? well, my friend, today we have a hack that will change your life forever. today sammo sent us a link to jp brown’s amazing rubick’s cube solving robot.

the final task on my big list of things to do can finally be crossed off. life is good.

Link to full story.

Gas prices on verge of setting a record

Filed under
Misc

The average U.S. retail price for regular-grade gasoline rose 5.7 cents to $2.056 a gallon in the week ended today, less than a cent below the all-time record reached in May, the Energy Department said.

Gasoline prices across the U.S. have climbed since mid- February as refiners passed along higher costs for crude oil, which makes up about half the motor fuel's price. Oil futures in New York have climbed 26 percent this year to $54.95 a barrel today, the highest since October.

Nvidia core G80 emerges

Filed under
Hardware

NVIDIA'S NEXT generation graphic remains a well protected secret. We still managed to get some information about it, despite that. We confirmed that G70 is the real thing and we learned that Nvidia has one more chip down the road codenamed the G80.

MSN TV hacker jailed

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

A Louisiana man has been sent to prison for six months for sending a malicious e-mail to Microsoft MSN TV customers.

The e-mails the convicted man sent out contained an attachment that the mails claimed would re-set their TV’s display colours when opened. Instead, the attachment contained script that re-programmed customers’ TV boxes to dial 911 instead of a local phone number to access Microsoft’s servers.

'Best blogs on the web' honoured

Filed under
Web

The best of the web's blogs - online diaries or websites where people publish their thoughts - have been recognised in the annual Bloggies. The winners from 30 categories were announced at the SXSW Interactive Festival in Texas, US. Boing Boing won the coveted overall best blog prize.

Geekfathers: CyberCrime Mobs Revealed

Filed under
Legal

Crime is now organized on the Internet. Operating in the anonymity of cyberspace, Web mobs with names like Shadowcrew and stealthdivision are building networks that help crackers and phishers, money launderers and fences skim off some of the billions that travel through the Web every day.

Internet Access Tax May Not Be Dead

Filed under
Web

Thought you were free from paying new taxes on your Internet access, at least for the next four years? The Internet Tax Non-Discrimination Act was supposed to put a moratorium on new Net taxes. That, however, hasn't stopped some in Washington from suggesting that old taxes might be applied in new ways.

KDE 3.4 Out?

Filed under
News

Well, no, not officially, but distro developers are beginning to leak them. They appeared in this morning's gentoo portage (masked) and PLD mirrors.

Scheduled to be officially released Wednesday, March 16, the natives are getting restless. Myself? Definitely. I'm debating whether to start the download now or wait. I'm also debating whether to use ebuilds or tarballs. Decisions, decisions, decisions...

New game of tagging may be "it"

Filed under
Web

One of the more tantalizing, if not confounding, innovations in how people share information on the Web has to do with a new process called tagging.

Promulgated by a site called del.icio.us, tagging has to do with on-the-fly categorization of Web links. It's like a do-it-yourself Dewey Decimal System for the Web, except that it really isn't a system at all. At least, not yet.

Securing Slackware

Filed under
Linux
Using the exec-shield Kernel Patch on Slackware 10.1

by Kurt Fitzner

The Holy Grail of most any hacker trying to get access to a system is the remote buffer overflow attack. Well, actually, it's finding a Windows PC not protected by a firewall, but the remote buffer overflow attack is a (somewhat) close second. This article will discus one way to help protect against this type of attack on a Slackware Linux system with the installation of a special system called exec-shield.

Interview, interview, they've all got it in to view

Filed under
KDE

On LugRadio Jono Bacon, Stuart Langridge, Ade Bradshaw, and Matt Revell talk about Linux and whatever else comes along, including:

Aaron Seigo, KDE developer, talks about what KDE's up to and dispels some myths about the desktop environment.

Link.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Code of Conduct, Kelly Davis, Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions

  • ow We’re Making Code of Conduct Enforcement Real — and Scaling it
    This is the first line of our Community Participation Guidelines — and an nudge to keep empathy at center when designing response processes. Who are you designing for? Who is impacted? What are their needs, expectations, dependencies, potential bias and limitations?
  • Role Models in AI: Kelly Davis
    Meet Kelly Davis, the Manager/Technical Lead of the machine learning group at Mozilla. His work at Mozilla includes developing an open speech recognition system with projects like Common Voice and Deep Speech (which you can help contribute to). Beyond his passion for physics and machine learning, read on to learn about how he envisions the future of AI, and advice he offers to young people looking to enter the field.
  • Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions
    While the world celebrates athletic excellence, we’re taking a moment to share some of the amazing Internet champions that help build, support and share Firefox.

Canonical Ubuntu 2017 milestones, a year in the rulebook

So has Canonical been breaking rules with Ubuntu is 2017, or has it in been writing its own rulebook? Back in April we saw an AWS-tuned kernel of Ubuntu launched, the move to cloud is unstoppable, clearly. We also saw Ubuntu version 17.04 released, with Unity 7 as the default desktop environment. This release included optimisations for environments with low powered graphics hardware. Read more Also: Ubuntu will let upgraders ‘opt-in’ to data collection in 18.04

The npm Bug

  • ​Show-stopping bug appears in npm Node.js package manager
    Are you a developer who uses npm as the package manager for your JavaScript or Node.js code? If so, do not -- I repeat do not -- upgrade to npm 5.7.0. Nothing good can come of it. As one user reported, "This destroyed 3 production servers after a single deploy!" So, what happened here? According to the npm GitHub bug report, "By running sudo npm under a non-root user (root users do not have the same effect), filesystem permissions are being heavily modified. For example, if I run sudo npm --help or sudo npm update -g, both commands cause my filesystem to change ownership of directories such as /etc, /usr, /boot, and other directories needed for running the system. It appears that the ownership is recursively changed to the user currently running npm."
  • Botched npm Update Crashes Linux Systems, Forces Users to Reinstall
    A bug in npm (Node Package Manager), the most widely used JavaScript package manager, will change ownership of crucial Linux system folders, such as /etc, /usr, /boot. Changing ownership of these files either crashes the system, various local apps, or prevents the system from booting, according to reports from users who installed npm v5.7.0. —the buggy npm update.

Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux Performance For Early 2018

Back in December was our most recent round of Windows Subsystem for Linux benchmarking with Windows 10 while since then both Linux and Windows have received new stable updates, most notably for mitigating the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks looking at the Windows 10 WSL performance against Linux using the latest updates as of this week while also running some comparison tests too against Docker on Windows and Oracle VM VirtualBox. Read more