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Monday, 21 Jan 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Android Leftovers

Server: QUIC, Supercomputers, CloudLinux Dashboard and Cloud Native Computing Foundation

  • Daniel Stenberg: QUIC and missing APIs
    I trust you’ve heard by now that HTTP/3 is coming. It is the next destined HTTP version, targeted to get published as an RFC in July 2019. Not very far off. HTTP/3 will not be done over TCP. It will only be performed over QUIC, which is a transport protocol replacement for TCP that always is done encrypted. There’s no clear-text version of QUIC.
  • Huge Supercomputers Still Exist. Here’s What They’re Being Used for Today
    The term “Supercomputer” implies one gigantic computer many times more powerful than your simple laptop, but that couldn’t be farther from the case. Supercomputers are made up of thousands of smaller computers, all hooked up together to perform one task. Each CPU core in a datacenter probably runs slower than your desktop computer. It’s the combination of all of them that makes computing so efficient. There’s a lot of networking and special hardware involved in computers of this scale, and it isn’t as simple as just plugging each rack into the network, but you can envision them this way, and you wouldn’t be far off the mark. Not every task can be parallelized so easily, so you won’t be using a supercomputer to run your games at a million frames per second. Parallel computing is usually good at speeding up very calculation-oriented computing. Supercomputers are measured in FLOPS, or Floating Point Operations Per Second, which is essentially a measure of how quickly it can do math. The fastest one currently is IBM’s Summit, which can reach over 200 PetaFLOPS, a million times faster than “Giga” most people are used to.
  • CloudLinux Dashboard — Now in Production
    The CloudLinux OS Team is excited to announce the CloudLinux Dashboard Production release for our valued server and hosting panel administrators. We believe that this product will firmly integrate into your workflow and greatly improve your performance when managing servers.
  • Google dominates code contributions across Cloud Native Computing Foundation projects
    Even without counting Kubernetes, Google is far and away the largest code contributor to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) open source group. Google accounts for 53% of all code commits to the Linux Foundation's CNCF and has seven times more contributions than Red Hat, which only accounted for 7.4% of the contributed code. The analysis of code contributions was done by Stackalytics, which is an open source code analysis framework that is hosted by the OpenStack Foundation and sponsored by Mirantis.

OpenSUSE/SUSE: SLES for SAP and Christian Boltz Introduced

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications support update
    SUSE has announced effective December 1, 2018, two changes to its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for SAP Applications product. SLES for SAP Applications now includes support for a given service pack for 4.5 years with the regular subscription while the basic codestream is general available and itself fully maintained. This change reflects the request from clients to align OS upgrades with hardware life cycles. To explain this a bit further, this change affects SLES for SAP Applications 12 and 15 code streams. SLES for SAP Applications 11 is at the end of the general availability already, therefore SLES for SAP Applications 11 SP4 is the last service pack. If clients choose to stay on SLES for SAP Applications 11, then they will need to purchase LTSS to ensure ongoing support. This is especially true for clients that run SAP HANA 1 workloads on IBM Power Systems servers in Big Endian mode.
  • 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Christian Boltz
    With two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

ArchLabs Refresh Release, 2019.01.20

Gidday ArchLabbers, Happy New Year. With the new year comes an ISO refresh. All changes are listed at the change-log. If you encounter any issues, please post them at the forum. Also, ArchLabs related bugs need to be raised at BitBucket. Read more

Jono Bacon: Sensationalism takes a choke-hold

Filed under
Web

Oh dear. I used to like reading Groklaw and admired it for its accuracy and straight-down-the-line reporting. Recently though, I have felt it has become too much of a pulpit, and this post is just sensationalist clutching at straws.

Get your ABC's of Linux right

Filed under
Humor

Recently, one of my friends shared with me this rather funny ode to Linux which was passed on to him by a friend of his, which I am in turn sharing with you. So without much ado, here is the rhyming ode to Linux ...

Using multiple network cards in XEN 3.0

Filed under
HowTos

Xen is great. But installing more than one network card became a pain when I tried it the first time. There are some documents describing the principle but I was unable to find a real life example somewhere else. So this is a summary about how it works here now.

ET Live CD

Filed under
Gaming

An Enemy Territory live CD has been released recently by [*C]ascii at nixcoders.org. The CD is available in two versions, one including the nvidia, the other one utilizing the ati drivers for optimal support of your graphics card. More Here.

The Linux way to Flickr

Filed under
Software

The Flickr Web portal allows people to publish and share online, grouped and tagged by subject, whole galleries of digital pictures. You can use Flickr with several GNU/Linux-based applications. Developers can also use the API published on the Web site to obtain an API_KEY and build new interfaces to download, upload, or process pictures in Flickr. What might be less known is that Flickr already is another place where GNU/Linux users can meet, as well as a potentially very useful advocacy tool.

Malaysian OSS master plan gets pruned

Filed under
OSS

It was a small change, the deletion of a single sentence from the Open Source Master Plan. But the impact could be major to companies that supply software to the Malaysian Government.

Linux Grabs 75% of All Open Source Investment

Filed under
Linux

The Linux operating system is the recipient of 75% of all vendor investment in open source software, according to a new report from the Harvard Business School, which also indicates that vendor support for open source is primarily motivated by boosting their proprietary offerings.

Linux adoption - it's the ecology stupid!

Filed under
Linux

Why should an operating system be important for a mobile phone? It shouldn't, but of course mobile phones are no longer simple voice communicators. The handset manufacturers' need to get different types of products quickly to market makes the flexibility of an operating system platform particularly valuable.

Latest Search for Nina Reiser Unsuccessful

Filed under
Misc

The Contra Costa County sheriff's search and rescue team searched for the body of 31-year-old Nina Reiser in a hilly area near Oakland on Saturday but wasn't able to find her, sheriff's spokesman Jimmy Lee said today.

Ripping Shoutcast Streams to MP3’s in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

There are quite a few tutorials on how to rip Shoutcast internet radio streams into MP3 files for Windows. Most of these make use of Winamp and a plugin called Streamripper. This is fine and dandy, but you are not a Windows user. So here is a way to do just as easily on Linux.

Locking Down Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Security is an important issue in computing. Unfortunately, many computers allow a cracker to gain access to them and retrieve sensitive information, or just make life hard. This article will review the basics in general security and explain how to apply it to two Linux distributions--Ubuntu and Kubuntu.

Maintaining the 2.4 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

Willy Tarreau replaced Marcelo Tosatti as the 2.4 stable Linux kernel maintainer in August of 2006. In response to a series of compilation fixes sent to the lkml by Mariusz Kozlowski, Willy suggested that all patches would be postponed until 2.4.34 is released.

Combo TV/PC gadget runs SUSE Linux on P4

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Hong Kong based systems integrator Quataris has updated its all-in-one Pentium 4 based analog TV/PC design. The new Ottimo model, which features an innovative mechanical design, supports processors up to 2.8GHz, comes with 15-, 17-, or 19-inch screens, and is available pre-installed with SUSE Linux.

Firefox and Linux

Filed under
Moz/FF

At the recent Firefox Summit, a group of people led by Chris Aillon (Red Hat), Robert O’Callahan (Novell), and myself met to discuss Firefox on the Linux desktop. Historically, there has been a great deal of tension between mozilla.org and the Linux distros.

Microsoft looking into Windows on OLPC

Filed under
OLPC
Microsoft

Microsoft is looking to have its Windows operating system run on the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) notebook computers, OLPC chairman said at the Netevents conference in Hong Kong on Saturday.

"I've known Bill [Gates] his entire adult life. We talk, we meet one on one, we discuss this project," Negroponte said according to a transcript that was provided to vnunet.com.

New NVIDIA Linux Display Drivers Released

Filed under
Software

Version: 1.0-9631
Operating Systems: Linux x86, AMD64/EM64T, FreeBSD x86, Solaris x64/x86
Release Date: December 4, 2006

Bastille: rated security with education

Filed under
Software

Bastille is a program for improving system security on Debian, Fedora, Gentoo, Mandriva, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, and SUSE. Unlike packet sniffers, anti-virus programs, and the majority of security programs available today, Bastille does not wait to react to possible security breaches, but prevents them by removing system vulnerabilities. With many distributions softening security in their default installations in the name of convenience, this approach is enough by itself to make Bastille an essential program.

Installing Damn Small Linux onto your hard drive

Filed under
HowTos

This is a great way to extend the life of your older computers. In my case, I’ve installed it on a IBM T21 with 256MB of memory and a 30 GB hard drive. This tutorial assumes that the user has some linux and command line experience.

Get Paid to Solve Open Source Problems

Filed under
OSS

Getting help on issues related to open source projects isn't always like walking a straight line. Sure there are bug reports, mailing lists and discussion forums, but the challenge of actually getting specific local issues addressed is not a sure thing. That's the gap that OpenLogic is attempting to fill with its Expert Community program.

Open Document Format published as ISO standard

Filed under
OSS

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) finally published the Open Document Format (ODF) as an official standard last week after approving it as an international standard last May. The ODF file format is the XML-based open format for text, spreadsheet, database, and presentation files.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Server: QUIC, Supercomputers, CloudLinux Dashboard and Cloud Native Computing Foundation

  • Daniel Stenberg: QUIC and missing APIs
    I trust you’ve heard by now that HTTP/3 is coming. It is the next destined HTTP version, targeted to get published as an RFC in July 2019. Not very far off. HTTP/3 will not be done over TCP. It will only be performed over QUIC, which is a transport protocol replacement for TCP that always is done encrypted. There’s no clear-text version of QUIC.
  • Huge Supercomputers Still Exist. Here’s What They’re Being Used for Today
    The term “Supercomputer” implies one gigantic computer many times more powerful than your simple laptop, but that couldn’t be farther from the case. Supercomputers are made up of thousands of smaller computers, all hooked up together to perform one task. Each CPU core in a datacenter probably runs slower than your desktop computer. It’s the combination of all of them that makes computing so efficient. There’s a lot of networking and special hardware involved in computers of this scale, and it isn’t as simple as just plugging each rack into the network, but you can envision them this way, and you wouldn’t be far off the mark. Not every task can be parallelized so easily, so you won’t be using a supercomputer to run your games at a million frames per second. Parallel computing is usually good at speeding up very calculation-oriented computing. Supercomputers are measured in FLOPS, or Floating Point Operations Per Second, which is essentially a measure of how quickly it can do math. The fastest one currently is IBM’s Summit, which can reach over 200 PetaFLOPS, a million times faster than “Giga” most people are used to.
  • CloudLinux Dashboard — Now in Production
    The CloudLinux OS Team is excited to announce the CloudLinux Dashboard Production release for our valued server and hosting panel administrators. We believe that this product will firmly integrate into your workflow and greatly improve your performance when managing servers.
  • Google dominates code contributions across Cloud Native Computing Foundation projects
    Even without counting Kubernetes, Google is far and away the largest code contributor to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) open source group. Google accounts for 53% of all code commits to the Linux Foundation's CNCF and has seven times more contributions than Red Hat, which only accounted for 7.4% of the contributed code. The analysis of code contributions was done by Stackalytics, which is an open source code analysis framework that is hosted by the OpenStack Foundation and sponsored by Mirantis.

OpenSUSE/SUSE: SLES for SAP and Christian Boltz Introduced

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications support update
    SUSE has announced effective December 1, 2018, two changes to its SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) for SAP Applications product. SLES for SAP Applications now includes support for a given service pack for 4.5 years with the regular subscription while the basic codestream is general available and itself fully maintained. This change reflects the request from clients to align OS upgrades with hardware life cycles. To explain this a bit further, this change affects SLES for SAP Applications 12 and 15 code streams. SLES for SAP Applications 11 is at the end of the general availability already, therefore SLES for SAP Applications 11 SP4 is the last service pack. If clients choose to stay on SLES for SAP Applications 11, then they will need to purchase LTSS to ensure ongoing support. This is especially true for clients that run SAP HANA 1 workloads on IBM Power Systems servers in Big Endian mode.
  • 2018-2019 openSUSE Board Elections: Meet incumbent Christian Boltz
    With two weeks to go until the ballots open on Monday, February 4, 2019, openSUSE News and the Elections Committee are running a “meet your candidates” series. Questions were sent out to the seven Candidates. The questions and answers will appear in the News, one Candidate each day, in alphabetical order.

ArchLabs Refresh Release, 2019.01.20

Gidday ArchLabbers, Happy New Year. With the new year comes an ISO refresh. All changes are listed at the change-log. If you encounter any issues, please post them at the forum. Also, ArchLabs related bugs need to be raised at BitBucket. Read more