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Tuesday, 19 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Sylpheed and Gxine in Pardus 2007

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HowTos

Sylpheed is a lightweight Gtk-based e-mail client (text mails only, not HTML mails!) which doesn't have any other major dependencies. Here's how I added it [and gxine] to Pardus 2007.

Even Microsoft Can't Compete With Linux Forever

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Linux
Interviews

Two major forces of Linux community -- Open Source Developer Labs and Free Standards Group -- have come together to form Linux Foundation. Here is an exclusive interview of Jim Zemlin, executive director of Free Standards Group.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 186

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Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Interview: Matteo Riondato, FreeSBIE

  • News: Mandriva Metisse edition, PCLinuxOS 2007, gNewSense interview, Fedora 6 re-spins, Gentoo on a server, T-Resc(ue) live CD, OpenSolaris updates
  • Released last week: Damn Small Linux 3.2, ZenLive 4.2
  • Upcoming releases: DragonFly BSD 1.8
  • Site news: Mandriva joins the list of DistroWatch page hit ranking cheaters
  • New additions: BOSS GNU/Linux
  • New distributions: Hardened Linux, ValEnt Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Video Editing: From Windows To Linux

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Software

Without a doubt, one of the biggest problems that I had when I was transitioning from Windows to Linux was losing immediate access to Adobe Premiere Elements. To the video beginner, it can present a little bit of a learning curve, but for someone like me, it’s irreplaceable. Short of buying an Adobe Premiere, I could not have been happier.

FreeNAS makes it easy to add storage to home networks

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HowTos

FreeNAS is a small, powerful, full-featured implementation of FreeBSD as a network-attached storage device. It's powerful enough to be used in the enterprise, but it's friendly enough so that even a typical home office user can take advantage of it. Here's how I created an easy-to-use NAS device for rsync backups and FTP server on my LAN.

Reporting Debian bugs without a working MTA

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HowTos

Debian makes heavy use of it's bug-tracking system for allowing users to inform developers which problem need fixing. However, it normally requires you to have a working MTA that connects to the Internet. This article shows that you can still report bugs even if you don't have a working MTA for any reason.

Book Review: SELinux by Example

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Reviews

SELinux is a project started and actively being maintained by the U.S Department of Defense to provide a Mandatory Access Controls mechanism in Linux. The target audience for this book is SELinux policy writers and system administrators with more content dedicated to be put to use by policy writers.

Why Gentoo Shouldn't be on Your Server

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Gentoo

Over the last year I have run a server using the Linux flavor Gentoo. There are things I really like about Gentoo: the package management, USE flags and the sophisticated dependencies system. But unfortunately the drawbacks are severe for a server setting.

Xfce 4.4.0 released

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Software

After more than two years of development, Xfce 4.4.0 has just been released. Xfce 4.4 features new tools such as the much awaited Thunar file manager as well as several huge improvements of its core components.

Customizing general OpenOffice.org settings

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HowTos

OpenOffice.org includes dozens of options for how it behaves. Available from Tools > Options, they are divided into general settings for the entire office suite and settings particular to each application. General settings are available under the general headings of OpenOffice.org, Load/Save, and Language Settings.

7 reasons why you should consider Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

This post is generally aimed at people who still use only Microsoft Operating systems (e.g. XP, Vista, Win98) etc. In this article I am talking about Ubuntu, which is a linux distro (distribution - think of it as a ‘version’ or ‘flavor’ of linux), however most of the points below could be applied to any modern stable Linux distro.

Modify Your Partitions With GParted Without Losing Data

This article shows how you can modify the partitioning of your Linux system with GParted (Gnome Partition Editor) without losing data. This includes resizing partitions (enlarging and shrinking), moving partitions on the hard drive, creating and deleting partitions, and even modifying filesystem types. GParted is a free partition editor available as a desktop program and also as a Live-CD. It supports the following filesystems: ext2, ext3, fat16, fat32, hfs, hfs+, jfs, linux-swap, reiserfs, reiser4, ufs, xfs, and even ntfs (Windows).

MD5 Checksum Howto

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HowTos

MD5 is an algorithm that is used to verify data integrity through the creation of a 128-bit message digest from data input (which may be a message of any length) that is claimed to be as unique to that specific data as a fingerprint is to the specific individual. Why I need to do the checking? Is it important?

OSDL, Free Standards Group To Merge

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OSS

The two main evangelizers of the Linux operating system, Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) and the Free Standards Group (FSG) are merging to form the Linux Foundation.

AmigaOS 4

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OS
Reviews

The Amiga computer has long been the subject of intense nostalgia in the hearts of anyone who owned one. Released in 1985, only a year after the original Macintosh, the Amiga featured vivid color graphics, 4-channel stereo sampled sound, and a graphical, preemptive multitasking operating system that seemed to come from years in the future. Yet the Amiga languished in obscurity. Many companies made attempts to revive the Amiga. Now, Hyperion Entertainment, Inc., developers of the new AmigaOS 4 operating system, have announced that a final release version is available for download.

So You're Curious About Linux...

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Linux

Every now and then I make a personal acquaintance with somebody who's never seen Linux, but has heard of it. They want to know what it's like and should they try it. I always find myself making the same speech, and I figure lots of other Linux users do too. So here is my canonical About Linux speech.

Time for Novell to Settle the SCOre

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OS

I'm overjoyed that with Microsoft, Sun and greedy investors bailing out of bailing duty, SCO's ship is sinking fast from the holes it punched in its own hull. IBM's role as anchor is finally proving effective, but the torpedo boat is captained by Novell's frighteningly accomplished legal team, ably assisted by the SCO litigation squad, F Troop.

Linux: Marking Code Obsolete Or Deprecated

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Linux

Robert Day proposed a couple of new kernel code maturity configuration options for tagging code as either "deprecated" or "obsolete". He referenced earlier confusion around the attempt to remove devfs [story] in which it wasn't clear on the current state and future plans for the code.

How to install SysAid in (K)Ubuntu linux

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HowTos

In my last post called Keeping an eye on the companies goods I commented about a very useful program called SysAid. I previously used it under RedHat Fedora core 4 where it worked quite well. Installing it was a bit of a hassle and this was where I sampled the superb technical support of the SysAid team.

10 Games from the Ubuntu Universe

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Gaming

Now and again, I show some new Linux users some of the games that are available for Ubuntu. Many of those times, theres a seasoned Ubuntu user close by, who says that they haven’t seen that before. I decided to put together a list of 10 games in the Ubuntu Universe that I have installed.

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Games: King of Cards, GOG, Blade Symphony and Monster Logic

  • Shovel Knight's final two expansions King of Cards and Showdown have been delayed
    Yacht Club Games originally announced the final two expansions would be released in April but they've decided to delay them. For those not up to speed, King of Cards is the next and final expansion for Shovel Knight: Treasure Trove. You take on the role of King Knight, through 4 new worlds and more than 30 all new courses. Then we have Showdown, which is a mix of multiplayer madness for up to 4 players as well as giving another new story mode. Both are going to be free updates when released!
  • GOG has another sale on for the 'Lantern Festival' with some good Linux games going cheap
    It seems there's a game sale for every possible event in the world now, not that I am complaining as it's good for our wallets. The current sale over on GOG is their 'Lantern Festival' to celebrate the Year of the Pig. So you too can pig-out out on some of the great deals going. This time, there's not a huge selection for Linux gamers, so I've picked out a few of the best deals.
  • Blade Symphony patch 7 is out with experimental asset streaming, free to play release next month
    Some big news for Blade Symphony today, not only do they have another major patch release they've also announced the free to play release date. On March 7th, the flood gates will officially open on Steam for everyone to jump into Blade Symphony completely free. This is a huge milestone for Puny Human, something they've been solidly working towards for some time now.
  • Monstrous programming puzzle game 'Monster Logic' is coming to Linux this year
    While it has no clear release date other than this year, Monster Logic certainly looks like a sweet programming puzzle game that's coming to Linux.

All-in-One Messaging Application Franz 5 Sees First Stable Release

After 24 beta releases, Franz, an all-in-one messaging application, has reached version 5.0.0 stable. Besides being the first Franz 5 stable release, the latest 5.0.0 version brings automatic spellcheck language detection, an option to quit Franz from the Windows taskbar, updated Electron to version 4.0.4 (from 4.0.2), and small bugfixes and improvements. Franz is a free Electron application for Windows, Linux and Mac that combines almost 70 chat and messaging services into a single window that can run in the background, with multi-account support, notifications and a system tray, spell checking, and other useful features. Read more

5 Good Open Source Speech Recognition/Speech-to-Text Systems

A speech-to-text (STT) system is as its name implies; A way of transforming the spoken words via sound into textual files that can be used later for any purpose. Speech-to-text technology is extremely useful. It can be used for a lot of applications such as a automation of transcription, writing books/texts using your own sound only, enabling complicated analyses on information using the generated textual files and a lot of other things. In the past, the speech-to-text technology was dominated by proprietary software and libraries; Open source alternatives didn’t exist or existed with extreme limitations and no community around. This is changing, today there are a lot of open source speech-to-text tools and libraries that you can use right now. Here we list 5 of them. Read more

Software: CLI File Viewers, 5 Excellent Free Mind Mapping Software and Sophos Snakeoil for Linux

  • 3 tools for viewing files at the command line
    I always say you don't need to use the command line to use Linux effectively—I know many Linux users who never crack open a terminal window and are quite happy. However, even though I don't consider myself a techie, I spend about 20% of my computing time at the command line, manipulating files, processing text, and using utilities. One thing I often do in a terminal window is viewing files, whether text or word processor files. Sometimes it's just easier to use a command line utility than to fire up a text editor or a word processor. Here are three of the utilities I use to view files at the command line.
  • 5 Excellent Free Mind Mapping Software
    Structured thinking is a process of setting a framework to an unstructured problem. Having a structure not only helps to understand a particular problem, it also helps to identify areas which need more understanding. Structured thinking allows us to map ideas in structured fashion, thereby enabling the identification of areas which require the most thought. Mind mapping is a fairly free flowing concept. This means you need software that is versatile, and can adapt to your requirements. Your idea of a neat and tidy mind map might be another person’s idea of bamboozling. A map can concentrate very complex content in a small space such as a piece of paper. It helps to use both sides of your brain: the logical side and also the creative side. It’s a technique to help organize the way you think and stimulate your creativity: It can help you by developing, sorting and helping to memorize your ideas. Mind mapping software therefore offers an excellent way of capturing your thoughts in a structured way, brainstorming new ideas. Move away from simple lists, and use this software to link ideas in different ways. By thinking creatively, not linearly, we can seize on our big ideas.
  • How to install Sophos Antivirus for Linux [Ed: Installing proprietary software on GNU/Linux would likely cause security issues and/or add back doors, not improve real security]
    Seeing the Ubuntu popularity between both Desktops and serves, here we are using Ubuntu to show how to install Sophos Antivirus for Linux.