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Thursday, 21 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android L update for Google Nexus 4, 5, 7 and 10 to release in late October Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 7:10am
Story KDE Releases in the Future Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 7:05am
Story Preview Of AMD Radeon R9 290 Hawaii Open-Source Performance Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 6:58am
Story Why I don't distro-hop: Because work. And pain. Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 6:49am
Story Meet Sascha Meinrath - Akademy Keynote Speaker Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 6:41am
Story Is Open Source Becoming the De Facto Standard in the Data Center? Rianne Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 6:30am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:23am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:22am
Story Video: Which Super Hero Would the Linux Community Be? Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:09am
Story Cheapo Firefox OS mobes to debut in India – definitely not one for selfie-conscious users Roy Schestowitz 24/08/2014 - 12:03am

Dunc-Tank: Success or failure?

Filed under
Interviews

The Dunc-Tank project has been the topic of much debate in the Debian community since it was launched in September last year. It has now been more than a month since the scheduled release of Debian 4.0, codenamed etch. However, even with Dunc-Tank's funding, etch is yet to be seen.

Red Hat is under siege

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat is under siege. When Oracle launched a direct attack on Red Hat's business model last October, Red Hat's share price sank by 24 per cent. And this week it added management tools to its Linux support service. Now, it's not alone: Sun has thrown Solaris into the mix.

What is this vigr program thingy?

Filed under
HowTos

Here you are spending a few pleasant moments running a critical eye over your directory system when you are suddenly quite alarmed. Staring you accusingly in the face is a program thingy called "vigr". Oh No! You think.

Installing Zimbra on Ubuntu 6.10

Filed under
HowTos

Zimbra is an open source email server. It does email, calendar, contacts, and various other useful things that software like Microsoft Exchange does. The problem is that Zimbra has a number of dependencies on other open source projects and they don't provide direct downloads for those dependencies.

Setting Up A News-Voting Website With Pligg

Filed under
Web
HowTos

This article shows how to set up your own news-voting website with Pligg. Pligg is a content-management system published under the Affero General Public License, and it is written in PHP and uses a MySQL database for storing its data. With a little work you can create your own community and let users vote news to the front page.

Interview with Dr Andrew S Tanenbaum

Filed under
Interviews

Creator of MINIX, flame-war legend and well known supporter of microkernels -- these are some of the monikers of Dr Andrew S Tanenbaum; he probably wrote a textbook or two that is in your library as well. Builder AU's Nick Gibson caught up with Dr Tanenbaum after his keynote address at linux.conf.au and spoke about microkernels, MINIX and what's coming up on the horizon.

Portrait: Rosegarden's D. Michael McIntyre

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Interviews

If there is anything like a "typical" member of the free/open source community, that template is probably nothing like D. Michael McIntyre. By profession a truck driver, McIntyre holds a bachelor's degree in Foreign Languages, and he's used his facility with words to document the popular Rosegarden project. He's since gone on to do whatever he sees that needs to be done on the project, and has become an integral part of the Rosegarden team.

Book review: The Definitive Guide to GCC

Filed under
Reviews

Without the GNU Compiler collection GCC it would be difficult to imagine that free software would have had such a rapid penetration into the market place. If you want to use GCC (including version 4) to its utmost, The Definitive Guide to GCC, Second Edition, written by William von Hagen and published by Apress, is almost certainly for you.

Debugging system freezes

Filed under
HowTos

Sometimes your Debian box hangs, and for a strange reason, there is no debugging information printed on your screen. What options do you have?

Create virtual Machines Using Virtualbox in Debian

Filed under
HowTos

VirtualBox is a general-purpose full virtualizer for x86 hardware. Targeted at server, desktop and embedded use, it is now the only professional-quality virtualization solution that is also Open Source Software.

Change Prompt Color when logged in as Root

Filed under
HowTos

All security books will recommend you not to allow root SSH logins to your Linux machines. In this article, I will show you how to change the color of your prompt when you escalate your privileges to a super-user. This technique is a good way to remind yourself that you are holding high privileges.

Animated boot screen on openSuSE 10.2

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HowTos

Everyone who has used openSuSE 10.2 must have come across the animated boot screen. But the problem is that its not permanent. It comes sometimes, and doesnt come at other times. Im writing this tutorial for all you penguin lovers who would like to see the animated boot everytime!

GPL 3: An Open-Source Earthquake?

Filed under
OSS

For 15 years, the current version of the GNU General Public License (GPL) has remained untouched. One of the oldest, most widely used open-source licenses, the GPL is a foundational text and an ideological marker. Yet this spring, the GPL's author will release a controversial new version of the license, a move that's already sending tremors along the software industry's fault lines.

Mandriva Linux Opens Office in Lagos

Filed under
MDV

As part of its commitment to help bridge the digital divide and make ICT affordable and closer to the people of West Africa, Mandriva Linux has incorporated a subsidiary with headquarters in Lagos.

Open Source Pioneer Alan Dechert To Deliver Keynote at Red Hat Summit

Filed under
Linux

Alan Dechert, one of the pioneers in the open source software movement, will deliver the keynote speech at the Red Hat Summit.

PCLinuxOS Tops DistroWatch Page Hit Ranking

Filed under
PCLOS

After hovering around 13th position for several months this time last year and slowly moving up to around 7th six month ago, this past month has shown PCLOS climbing to 3rd, just below Ubuntu and openSUSE. But refresh for the last 7 days and you find that PCLinuxOS now reigns supreme, knocking Ubuntu out of its long standing first place. Congratulations PCLOS.

Distrowatch.com

Shuttleworth OK with "Evil Edgy"

Filed under
Ubuntu

The U.K.-based team that released the "Satanic" version of Ubuntu last December -- nicknamed "Evil Edgy" -- earlier this month added a KDE-based Kubuntu version. Ubuntu or Kubuntu Satanic Edition can be installed over any Ubuntu Edgy variant, the team said.

The Top Companies Contributing to F/OSS (as seen in Debian GNU/Linux)

Filed under
OSS

The nearly 300-page Economic Impact of FLOSS on Innovation and Competitiveness of the EU ICT Sector report shows that Sun is the largest contributor to F/OSS. IBM provides the next largest amount of contributions.

Frederic Crozat: Metisse is not a 3D desktop

Filed under
Software

I guess most people know now what my dream was : 3D can be more than just fancy. For some time now, I’ve been working with members of In Situ team to integrate their Metisse software in Mandriva Linux and it is really exciting.

Brazil's FOSS utopia image at risk

Filed under
OSS

According to the international media, Brazil is a leader in free and open source software (FOSS) adoption. The New York Times describes the country as "a tropical outpost of the free software movement," while BBC News claims that "Increasingly, Brazil's government ministries and state-run enterprises are abandoning Windows in favour of 'open-source' or 'free' software." However, FOSS advocates familiar with Brazil describe a less hopeful situation.

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    The whole is greater than the sum of its parts is a very famous quote from Aristotle, a Greek philosopher and scientist. This quote is particularly pertinent to Linux. In my view, one of Linux’s biggest strengths is its synergy. The usefulness of Linux doesn’t derive only from the huge raft of open source (command line) utilities. Instead, it’s the synergy generated by using them together, sometimes in conjunction with larger applications. The Unix philosophy spawned a “software tools” movement which focused on developing concise, basic, clear, modular and extensible code that can be used for other projects. This philosophy remains an important element for many Linux projects. Good open source developers writing utilities seek to make sure the utility does its job as well as possible, and work well with other utilities. The goal is that users have a handful of tools, each of which seeks to excel at one thing. Some utilities work well independently. This article looks at 4 open source command line HTTP clients. These clients let you download files over the internet from the command line. But they can also be used for many more interesting purposes such as testing, debugging and interacting with HTTP servers and web applications. Working with HTTP from the command-line is a worthwhile skill for HTTP architects and API designers. If you need to play around with an API, HTTPie and curl will be invaluable.
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