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Wednesday, 21 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story Usability Events at aKademy 2005 srlinuxx 03/09/2005 - 5:11pm
Story How the valley start-up was invented srlinuxx 04/09/2005 - 2:57am
Story Computer shoot-up games set young minds firing srlinuxx 04/09/2005 - 3:01am
Story Let's put internet porn on a new top shelf srlinuxx 04/09/2005 - 3:05am
Story Have you been "googled" srlinuxx 04/09/2005 - 5:43pm
Story A day at the fair is enlightening srlinuxx 04/09/2005 - 6:03pm
Story More parents going high-tech to track kids srlinuxx 04/09/2005 - 5:50pm
Story KDE and digiKam Receive TUX 2005 Readers' Choice Award srlinuxx 04/09/2005 - 5:55pm
Story Microsoft Blasts Massachusetts' New XML Policy srlinuxx 05/09/2005 - 12:33am
Story AMD's X86-64 site goes missing srlinuxx 05/09/2005 - 12:36am

'Best blogs on the web' honoured

Filed under
Web

The best of the web's blogs - online diaries or websites where people publish their thoughts - have been recognised in the annual Bloggies. The winners from 30 categories were announced at the SXSW Interactive Festival in Texas, US. Boing Boing won the coveted overall best blog prize.

Geekfathers: CyberCrime Mobs Revealed

Filed under
Legal

Crime is now organized on the Internet. Operating in the anonymity of cyberspace, Web mobs with names like Shadowcrew and stealthdivision are building networks that help crackers and phishers, money launderers and fences skim off some of the billions that travel through the Web every day.

Internet Access Tax May Not Be Dead

Filed under
Web

Thought you were free from paying new taxes on your Internet access, at least for the next four years? The Internet Tax Non-Discrimination Act was supposed to put a moratorium on new Net taxes. That, however, hasn't stopped some in Washington from suggesting that old taxes might be applied in new ways.

KDE 3.4 Out?

Filed under
News

Well, no, not officially, but distro developers are beginning to leak them. They appeared in this morning's gentoo portage (masked) and PLD mirrors.

Scheduled to be officially released Wednesday, March 16, the natives are getting restless. Myself? Definitely. I'm debating whether to start the download now or wait. I'm also debating whether to use ebuilds or tarballs. Decisions, decisions, decisions...

New game of tagging may be "it"

Filed under
Web

One of the more tantalizing, if not confounding, innovations in how people share information on the Web has to do with a new process called tagging.

Promulgated by a site called del.icio.us, tagging has to do with on-the-fly categorization of Web links. It's like a do-it-yourself Dewey Decimal System for the Web, except that it really isn't a system at all. At least, not yet.

Securing Slackware

Filed under
Linux
Using the exec-shield Kernel Patch on Slackware 10.1

by Kurt Fitzner

The Holy Grail of most any hacker trying to get access to a system is the remote buffer overflow attack. Well, actually, it's finding a Windows PC not protected by a firewall, but the remote buffer overflow attack is a (somewhat) close second. This article will discus one way to help protect against this type of attack on a Slackware Linux system with the installation of a special system called exec-shield.

Interview, interview, they've all got it in to view

Filed under
KDE

On LugRadio Jono Bacon, Stuart Langridge, Ade Bradshaw, and Matt Revell talk about Linux and whatever else comes along, including:

Aaron Seigo, KDE developer, talks about what KDE's up to and dispels some myths about the desktop environment.

Link.

10 Reasons to Switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

From the new "First and Only Magazine for the New Linux User" comes 10 Reasons to Switch to Linux.

  • It Doesn't Crash

  • Viruses Are Few and Far Between
  • Virtually Hardware-Independent
  • Freedom of Choice
  • Standards

Souped-up cellphones like tiny PCs

Filed under
Sci/Tech

A road warrior, Chad Stevens used to shuttle from airport to construction site to hotel, waiting until evening to catch up on the 200 e-mails accumulated each day on his laptop.

These days Stevens, who owns a travel-services business, leaves his laptop at home and uses his palmOne Treo to check e-mail, calendar appointments, driving directions and updates from his Web site — whether he's at a job site, at a stoplight or on his living-room couch.

Pimp my Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox straight 'out of the zip' is ok, but there's a lot you can change, modify and improve. From performance to looks to usability, Firefox tuning gives you the power to make a browser specific to your needs and taste.

CompUSA fingered by feds over rebates

Filed under
Legal

EVER WONDER about those Big Box rebate offers on computer kit being too good to be true? Still waiting for your rebate cheque to arrive? The US government is starting to move against companies that aren't paying up on time. On Friday, March 11, the United States Federal Trade Commission (here) settled charges against CompUSA and the offices of peripherals manufacturer QPS. Inc for "allegedly failing to pay, in a timely manner, thousands of rebates for products sold under the CompUSA and QPS brands."

Beer is fattening, say fat beer-swilling readers

Filed under
Misc

In reference to the article claiming beer isn't fattening, theregister received many letters disputing the findings. We laughed, we cried, ...it contains something for everyone. Link.

US DHS buys more name analysis tools

Filed under
Security

The Homeland Security Department's Customs and Border Protection agency, an arm of the Border and Transportation Security Directorate, has signed a sole-source contract with Language Analysis Systems Inc. of Herndon, Va., for additional software to help analyze names of people.

The software is particularly useful in winnowing the names of terrorists out of lists of passengers or other data sources.

Bringing $100 laptops to developing world

Filed under
Hardware

In rural Cambodian villages with no electricity, nighttime darkness is pierced by the glow from laptop computers that children bring home from school.

The kids belong to three schools that Nicholas Negroponte of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has equipped with inexpensive notebook computers.

"When the kids bring them home and open them up, it's the brightest light source in the home."

MADSHRIMPS Piotke's CeBIT Review

Filed under
Hardware
Humor

lol Piotke's review of Cebit is a little different than most all the others', in that his is a visual tour consisting solely of pictures. Not the same boring ole hardware for Piotke, no. He had a better time than most I would say!

Another One for Our Side

Filed under
Linux

Ardan Peddell, director of The Emerald Hill Group, which manages pubs in a trendy part of Singapore, had long been enticed by Linux's appeal. But he only started implementing the technology about three months ago-when a Linux expert came knocking at his door for a job. That hastened Emerald's adoption of Linux.

Microsoft's PUMA to prevent theft of audio data

Filed under
Microsoft

At the end of April at the WinHEC 2005 developers´ conference Microsoft intends to furnish further details on the copy protection functions of the successor to Windows XP Longhorn, which is planned for 2006.

Microsoft Monopoly Will Wane, Experts Say

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft's Explorer browser is already losing market share. It recently fell below the 90 percent mark because of competition from such rivals as the Firefox open-source browser. The Massachusetts Institute of Techology's Thomas Malone said he wouldn't predict how much Microsoft's dominance might fall.

Don't dump your stocks in the software giant, experts warn.

News Close to [my] Home

Filed under
Misc

Dude, You're Going To Hell!

Seems Dell has fired some Somali Muslims because their prayer schedule clashed with the production schedule. If the workers forge ahead with their plans to sue, "that path might lead to an unpleasant surprise for the workers. In a similar case last year,

Hot kNew Stuff

Filed under
KDE

ca asked why this interview with Josef Spillner wasn't on some of the biggie news sites, so I thought I'd share it on my teny tiny one.

"There has been some recent buzz around KDE's Get Hot New Stuff framework. As the first in a series looking into KDE technologies, KDE Dot News interviewed author Josef Spillner to find out what all this "stuff" was about... read on for the interview. You may also be interested in recent blog entries about KNewStuff: Kate, desktop backgrounds, Quanta, KNewStuffSecure, its user interface design and the HotStuff server setup."

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