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Tuesday, 19 Feb 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Reporting Debian bugs without a working MTA

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HowTos

Debian makes heavy use of it's bug-tracking system for allowing users to inform developers which problem need fixing. However, it normally requires you to have a working MTA that connects to the Internet. This article shows that you can still report bugs even if you don't have a working MTA for any reason.

Book Review: SELinux by Example

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Reviews

SELinux is a project started and actively being maintained by the U.S Department of Defense to provide a Mandatory Access Controls mechanism in Linux. The target audience for this book is SELinux policy writers and system administrators with more content dedicated to be put to use by policy writers.

Why Gentoo Shouldn't be on Your Server

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Gentoo

Over the last year I have run a server using the Linux flavor Gentoo. There are things I really like about Gentoo: the package management, USE flags and the sophisticated dependencies system. But unfortunately the drawbacks are severe for a server setting.

Xfce 4.4.0 released

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Software

After more than two years of development, Xfce 4.4.0 has just been released. Xfce 4.4 features new tools such as the much awaited Thunar file manager as well as several huge improvements of its core components.

Customizing general OpenOffice.org settings

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HowTos

OpenOffice.org includes dozens of options for how it behaves. Available from Tools > Options, they are divided into general settings for the entire office suite and settings particular to each application. General settings are available under the general headings of OpenOffice.org, Load/Save, and Language Settings.

7 reasons why you should consider Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

This post is generally aimed at people who still use only Microsoft Operating systems (e.g. XP, Vista, Win98) etc. In this article I am talking about Ubuntu, which is a linux distro (distribution - think of it as a ‘version’ or ‘flavor’ of linux), however most of the points below could be applied to any modern stable Linux distro.

Modify Your Partitions With GParted Without Losing Data

This article shows how you can modify the partitioning of your Linux system with GParted (Gnome Partition Editor) without losing data. This includes resizing partitions (enlarging and shrinking), moving partitions on the hard drive, creating and deleting partitions, and even modifying filesystem types. GParted is a free partition editor available as a desktop program and also as a Live-CD. It supports the following filesystems: ext2, ext3, fat16, fat32, hfs, hfs+, jfs, linux-swap, reiserfs, reiser4, ufs, xfs, and even ntfs (Windows).

MD5 Checksum Howto

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HowTos

MD5 is an algorithm that is used to verify data integrity through the creation of a 128-bit message digest from data input (which may be a message of any length) that is claimed to be as unique to that specific data as a fingerprint is to the specific individual. Why I need to do the checking? Is it important?

OSDL, Free Standards Group To Merge

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OSS

The two main evangelizers of the Linux operating system, Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) and the Free Standards Group (FSG) are merging to form the Linux Foundation.

AmigaOS 4

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OS
Reviews

The Amiga computer has long been the subject of intense nostalgia in the hearts of anyone who owned one. Released in 1985, only a year after the original Macintosh, the Amiga featured vivid color graphics, 4-channel stereo sampled sound, and a graphical, preemptive multitasking operating system that seemed to come from years in the future. Yet the Amiga languished in obscurity. Many companies made attempts to revive the Amiga. Now, Hyperion Entertainment, Inc., developers of the new AmigaOS 4 operating system, have announced that a final release version is available for download.

So You're Curious About Linux...

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Linux

Every now and then I make a personal acquaintance with somebody who's never seen Linux, but has heard of it. They want to know what it's like and should they try it. I always find myself making the same speech, and I figure lots of other Linux users do too. So here is my canonical About Linux speech.

Time for Novell to Settle the SCOre

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OS

I'm overjoyed that with Microsoft, Sun and greedy investors bailing out of bailing duty, SCO's ship is sinking fast from the holes it punched in its own hull. IBM's role as anchor is finally proving effective, but the torpedo boat is captained by Novell's frighteningly accomplished legal team, ably assisted by the SCO litigation squad, F Troop.

Linux: Marking Code Obsolete Or Deprecated

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Linux

Robert Day proposed a couple of new kernel code maturity configuration options for tagging code as either "deprecated" or "obsolete". He referenced earlier confusion around the attempt to remove devfs [story] in which it wasn't clear on the current state and future plans for the code.

How to install SysAid in (K)Ubuntu linux

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HowTos

In my last post called Keeping an eye on the companies goods I commented about a very useful program called SysAid. I previously used it under RedHat Fedora core 4 where it worked quite well. Installing it was a bit of a hassle and this was where I sampled the superb technical support of the SysAid team.

10 Games from the Ubuntu Universe

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Gaming

Now and again, I show some new Linux users some of the games that are available for Ubuntu. Many of those times, theres a seasoned Ubuntu user close by, who says that they haven’t seen that before. I decided to put together a list of 10 games in the Ubuntu Universe that I have installed.

Expect more open source enterprise apps this year: analysts

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OSS

Open source Could be on the short-list when it comes to application-buying decisions in 2007. Open source has won the first battle: it is now listed among the default platform decisions.

Install *ubuntu without a cdrom drive

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HowTos

If You have a old machine without CD-ROM and you want to use that as your ubuntu desktop You can use any one of the following solutions to install ubuntu.

How To Set Up Linux As A Dial-In Server

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Linux
HowTos

This document describes how to attach modems to a Linux box and allow it to receive calls to connect users to the network. It is like being your own ISP (Internet Service Provider). If your Linux box is connected to the Internet, then the users will also be connected to the Internet. Your Linux box becomes a router. This is also known as RAS (Remote Access Services) in the Microsoft world. In the Linux world it is called PPP (Point to Point Protocol).

PCLinuxOS 2007 Beta 2 (Test 1)

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PCLOS
Reviews
-s

The time is drawing near. The highly anticipated release of the all new PCLOS is right around the corner. Tex and the gang are uploading a beta to mirrors for public testing, but this lucky gal has been running an early beta on my new laptop for a coupla weeks now. I know, I can feel it in my bones, that this release will cause quite a stir. PCLOS already has one of the most loyal fan-bases in the game, but this release will bring more users than ever. I even think some larger distros will be feeling a bit of dread as announcements go out. Not only is the all new PCLOS the most beautiful yet, but it is updated to include some of the latest and greatest software available - all on top of an all new modern code base. Development has been long and hard, but the results will soon be known far and wide. Here's a bit of a sneak peek for those interested.

Philip Rosedale: The Man Behind Second Life

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Interviews

There is little about virtual worlds that is solid. Granted, life in an online fantasy like Second Life is supposed to be ephemeral, no more concrete than the electrons that make a computer screen come to life. But Philip Rosedale is CEO of a living, breathing company behind Second Life called Linden Lab, and it is riding a real-world wave of new users and publicity that suggests the blossoming of an Internet superstar.

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HowTos and Development Leftovers

Today in Techrights

Security: Nest Lockout, Moment of Truth for Cyber Insurance, DNS Hijacking Attacks and Australian Cracking

  • Nest is locking customers out of accounts until they fix their security

    Emails were sent last night to all users that may have been affected by recent [breaches], with a new password being mandatory, as it tries to avoid the "I'll do it later" attitude that means that often vulnerable passwords remain in use for months or years.

  • A Moment of Truth for Cyber Insurance

    Mondelez’s claim represents just a fraction of the billions of dollars in collateral damage caused by NotPetya, a destructive, indiscriminate cyberattack of unprecedented scale, widely suspected to have been launched by Russia with the aim of hurting Ukraine and its business partners. A compromised piece of Ukrainian accounting software allowed NotPetya to spread rapidly around the world, disrupting business operations and causing permanent damage to property of Mondelez and many others. According to reports, Zurich apparently rejected Mondelez’s claim on the grounds that NotPetya was an act of war and, therefore, excluded from coverage under its policy agreement. If the question of whether and how war risk exemptions apply is left to the courts to decide on a case-by-case basis, this creates a profound source of uncertainty for policyholders about the coverage they obtain.

  • A Deep Dive on the Recent Widespread DNS Hijacking Attacks

    The U.S. government — along with a number of leading security companies — recently warned about a series of highly complex and widespread attacks that allowed suspected Iranian hackers to siphon huge volumes of email passwords and other sensitive data from multiple governments and private companies. But to date, the specifics of exactly how that attack went down and who was hit have remained shrouded in secrecy.

    This post seeks to document the extent of those attacks, and traces the origins of this overwhelmingly successful cyber espionage campaign back to a cascading series of breaches at key Internet infrastructure providers.

  • With elections weeks away, someone “sophisticated” [cracked] Australia’s politicians

    With elections just three months away, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced on February 18 that the networks of the three major national political parties had been breached by what Australian security officials described as a "sophisticated state actor."

  • Australia's major political parties [cracked] in 'sophisticated' attack ahead of election

    Sources are describing the level of sophistication as "unprecedented" but are unable to say yet which foreign government is behind the attack.

  • Parliament attackers appear to have used Web shells

    Attackers who infiltrated the Australian Parliament network and also the systems of the Liberal, National and Labor Parties appear to have used Web shells – scripts that can be uploaded to a Web server to enable remote administration of a machine.

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