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Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux firms not impressed with Microsoft's customer win

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft's latest customer win has failed to impress members of the open source community, who insist that it doesn't prove that Windows is superior to Linux.

Richard Carlson, the head of business systems at RICS, admitted that the company did not do a comparative study of Linux and Windows.

eBayer seeks to exorcise voodoo cuddly toy

Filed under
Web

Those readers who feel that their lives are lacking a little excitement may well be interested in snapping up a possessed Stitch teddy bear which has terrorised a Canadian family to the point that they are now compelled to take the only course of action left to them - offload the voodoo devil cuddly toy on eBay before it decapitates the entire clan in an blood-splattered slashfest of mindless, knife-driven violence.

Dot-con job: How InfoSpace took its investors for a ride

Filed under
Web

Five years ago this week, at the height of the dot-com stock frenzy, a young Bellevue company called InfoSpace was worth more than Boeing.

InfoSpace's success was an illusion, created by lies and deception. Built on internal company e-mails, confidential documents filed in court and scores of interviews, Naveen Jain and others created the illusion of revenues with accounting tricks and dubious deals.

Microsoft contract win put down to Linux skills shortage

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft may find a monopoly on developers will help it maintain its grip on the software market in the face of Linux alternatives.

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors said that the decision to go with Microsoft was taken very early on before the job was put out to tender - on the basis that RICS' in-house developers were in the main Microsoft coders.

Maybe they should have called these guys.

Dell welcomes back Muslim workers

Filed under
Hardware
Legal

Dell Computer has reached agreement with 31 workers at its Nashville factory who left the firm after a disagreement over evening prayers.

Computers bad for kids

Filed under
Misc

Using a computer at home might actually reduce a child's performance in maths, science and English rather than improve it, a study has found.

Website offers cash for old mobile phones

Filed under
Web

A new UK website has launched, offering cash in exchange for second-hand phones.

Mopay says that if you send off your used phone - Freepost - to them they’ll send you a cheque in exchange. You can get a quote for your old phone online, before you send it in, and a cheque will arrive within an fortnight.

Intel's 64-Bit Pentium 4s Hit The Streets

Filed under
Hardware

Intel's first 64-bit Pentium 4 microprocessors were quietly added to the company's price lists on Sunday, heralding their entrance into the marketplace.

Although, AMD chip retains the speed crown.

Does Your Wi-Fi Hotspot Have an Evil Twin?

Filed under
Security

Identity thieves are going wireless in their quest to steal your personal info.

You may want to think twice before logging into a public wireless hotspot. Sure, grabbing a few minutes of connectivity is convenient, but identity thieves are discovering that, through "evil twin" attacks, hotspots are a great way to steal unsuspecting users' private information. So how does an evil twin attack work?

This Week's Movies: The Jacket and The Pacifier

Filed under
Movies
Reviews
-s

The Pacifier staring Vin Diesel was your basic Disney feel good movie. Formulaic, by-the-numbers plot and cookie cutter script are dressed up by an admirable performance from my favorite action hero and yours, Vin Diesel.

The Jacket was an imaginative pychological mystery with an intriguing plot and engaging dialogue. The actors did a marvelous job of portraying their characters. They made an unbelievable scenario plausible.

Circumventing Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

Notwithstanding the fact it will be many years before very many corporate users might be able to work in a "Microsoft-free" environment, there appears to be significant effort being put forth to make it a reality. From the geekiest tech pubs, like the Java Developer's Journal to august ones such as The Wall Street Journal, circumventing Microsoft is a hot topic.

Report finds surge in on-line attacks

Filed under
Security

Internet attacks on businesses and other organizations increased by about 28 per cent in the second half of 2004 compared with the first six months of the year, and hackers are setting their sights on the rapidly emerging mobile-computing market, warns a report on Internet security to be released Monday.

original content

Will Longhorn be short on features?

Filed under
Microsoft

While Microsoft continues raising Longhorn, rivals are seizing the operating system's extended adolescence to develop competing feature sets of their own.

The already scaled-back version of Longhorn is still roughly 18 months from shipping, and with the expected technical advances by Linux competitors during that time, Microsoft's estimable industry influence to sell the product as currently constituted will be severely tested.

Computer Addiction or Healthy Enthusiam?

Filed under
-s

Are you a computer addict? ... or is someone you love a computer addict?

If so, you are not alone.

I have this friend who I believe has become addicted to her computer. It started out innocently enough with the purchase of a computer to do her bookkeeping, keep in touch with long distant friends and relatives, or a little light reading. Over the next year or so she began to spend more and more time on it and less and less with her friends. She became withdrawn from society and stopped participating in activities she used to enjoy. Call her anytime day or night and in asking "wha'cha doing?" she states "playing on the computer". I jokingly told her "I think you are addicted to that thing".

NYPL Digital Gallery

Filed under
Web

The New York Public Library is making more than 275,000 images available for personal use. Print and frame these vintage maps, rare prints and photos and create your own personal art gallery.

Link.

Google Gmail accounts are bottomless barrels

Filed under
Web

PLENTY OF US use Google's Gmail accounts on a daily basis. I, for instance, obtained my first account back in early June, 2004. It only took me 10 months to fill Google's until then considered "huge" storage space. See, one gigabyte is not so much after all when you start leaving all your email on the remote server.

Back in February, I started getting nervous when the space-metre at my Gmail account hit "95%". I asked my contact at Google in the UK what would happen when the account reached 100%. Would email start bouncing back to sender? Would I be alerted and given the option to "upgrade" for a fee to a bigger storage space?

UK games industry 'needs support'

Filed under
Gaming

More software and games are being sold overseas than are imported, a good sign for the economy, said the report. It shows the interactive entertainment industry is doing financially better than film and television industries. The rising cost of making games has meant many studios have closed however, sending talent overseas.

A Peak at MDK 10.2-b2 AMD64

Filed under
Reviews
Submitted by Anonymous

Anonymous writes, "It took about 10-12 minutes to install. I selected the default installation. You need all 3 cd's if you are doing the default install though it appears to only need 3-4 packages from the 3rd cd.

Boot up speed was about the same as the x86 version. The noticable difference came after logging into the desktop. This is where you begin to notice the speed difference from accessing the menus to launching applications.

After cable recall, Xbox's still frying

Filed under
Microsoft

14 million games console owners are still at risk of waking up to find their Xbox has become an ex-box. For when Microsoft issued a safety advisory for Xbox customers last month, it failed to address the underlying problem.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME and Fedora

  • RFC: Integrating rsvg-rs into librsvg
    I have started an RFC to integrate rsvg-rs into librsvg. rsvg-rs is the Rust binding to librsvg. Like the gtk-rs bindings, it gets generated from a pre-built GIR file.
  • 1+ year of Fedora and GNOME hardware enablement
    A year and a couple of months ago, Christian Schaller asked me to pivot a little bit from working full time on Fleet Commander to manage a new team we were building to work on client hardware enablement for Fedora and GNOME with an emphasis on upstream. The idea was to fill the gap in the organization where nobody really owned the problem of bringing up new client hardware features vertically across the stack (from shell down to the kernel), or rather, ensure Fedora and GNOME both work great on modern laptops. Part of that deal was to take over the bootloader and start working closer to customers and hardware manufacturing parnters.
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Works on the beach
    My trip is getting really close, so I decided to upgrade my system to rawhide. Wait, what ? That is usually what everybody would tell you not to do. Rawhide has this reputation for frequent breakage, and who knows if my apps will work any given day. Not something you want to deal with while traveling.
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February

Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks (and Proprietary Opera)

  • Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks Like Waterfox, Pale Moon, or Basilisk
    Mozilla Firefox is an open source project, so anyone can take its code, modify it, and release a new browser. That’s what Waterfox, Pale Moon, and Basilisk are—alternative browsers based on the Firefox code. But we recommend against using any of them.
  • Opera Says Its Next Opera Release Will Have the Fastest Ad Blocker on the Block
    Opera Software promoted today its upcoming Opera 52 web browser to the beta channel claiming that it has the faster ad blocker on the market compared to previous Opera release and Google Chrome. One of the key highlights of the Opera 52 release will be the improved performance of the built-in ad blocker as Opera claims to have enhanced the string matching algorithm of the ad blocker to make it open web pages that contain ads much faster than before, and, apparently than other web browsers, such as Chrome.

Graphics: Glxinfo, ANV, SPIR-V

  • Glxinfo Gets Updated With OpenGL 4.6 Support, More vRAM Reporting
    The glxinfo utility is handy for Linux users in checking on their OpenGL driver in use by their system and related information. But it's not often that glxinfo itself gets updated, except that changed today with the release of mesa-demos-8.4.0 as the package providing this information utility. Mesa-demos is the collection of glxinfo, eglinfo, glxgears, and utilities related to Mesa. With the Mesa-demos 8.4.0 it is predominantly glxinfo updates.
  • Intel ANV Getting VK_KHR_16bit_storage Support Wrapped Up
    Igalia's Jose Maria Casanova Crespo sent out a set of patches today for fixes that allow for the enabling of the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension within Intel's ANV Vulkan driver. The patches are here for those interested in 16-bit storage support in Vulkan. This flips on the features for storageBuffer16BitAccess, uniformAndStorageBuffer16BitAccess, storagePushConstant16 and the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension. This support is present for Intel "Gen 8" Broadwell graphics and newer. Hopefully the work will be landing in Mesa Git soon.
  • SPIR-V Support For Gallium3D's Clover Is Closer To Reality
    It's been a busy past week for open-source GPU compute with Intel opening up their new NEO OpenCL stack, Karol Herbst at Red Hat posting the latest on Nouveau NIR support for SPIR-V compute, and now longtime Nouveau contributor Pierre Moreau has presented his latest for SPIR-V Clover support. Pierre has been spending about the past year adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's "Clover" OpenCL state tracker. SPIR-V, of course, is the intermediate representation used now by OpenCL and Vulkan.

Security: Updates, Tinder, FUD and KPTI Meltdown Mitigation

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Tinder vulnerability let hackers [sic] take over accounts with just a phone number

    The attack worked by exploiting two separate vulnerabilities: one in Tinder and another in Facebook’s Account Kit system, which Tinder uses to manage logins. The Account Kit vulnerability exposed users’ access tokens (also called an “aks” token), making them accessible through a simple API request with an associated phone number.

  • PSA: Improperly Secured Linux Servers Targeted with Chaos Backdoor [Ed: Drama queen once again (second time in a week almost) compares compromised GNU/Linux boxes to "back doors"]
    Hackers are using SSH brute-force attacks to take over Linux systems secured with weak passwords and are deploying a backdoor named Chaos. Attacks with this malware have been spotted since June, last year. They have been recently documented and broken down in a GoSecure report.
  • Another Potential Performance Optimization For KPTI Meltdown Mitigation
    Now that the dust is beginning to settle around the Meltdown and Spectre mitigation techniques on the major operating systems, in the weeks and months ahead we are likely to see more performance optimizations come to help offset the performance penalties incurred by mitigations like kernel page table isolation (KPTI) and Retpolines. This week a new patch series was published that may help with KPTI performance.