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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 17 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story What is good video editing software on Linux? Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2014 - 12:13am
Story MultiTail – Monitor Multiple Files Simultaneously in a Single Linux Terminal Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2014 - 12:07am
Story Linux 3.14-rc5 Rianne Schestowitz 04/03/2014 - 12:00am
Story Daimler hints at Android-powered telematics in future cars Rianne Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 11:52pm
Story Linux group could hasten 64-bit Android for ARM mobile devices Rianne Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 11:46pm
Story Are there enough users for Linux Mint Debian Edition to survive? Rianne Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 11:38pm
Story Cover Oregon should have used open-source software: Guest opinion Rianne Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 11:28pm
Story Report: Android Marches to 62 Percent of Tablet Market Rianne Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 11:22pm
Story KDE PIM November Sprint Rianne Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 11:12pm
Story Qt embedded GUI adds Yocto recipes, hops up emulator Rianne Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 11:02pm

REALbasic 2006 Release 3 for Linux

Filed under
Software

REAL Software, Inc. announced today that REALbasic 2006 Release 3 for Linux is available now. In addition to the over 100 features and fixes that have been added, REALbasic 2006 Release 3 for Linux has been specifically tested and optimized for use with SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop from Novell.

Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu caused a lot of friction with and for Debian. In discussions with its founder, Mark Shuttleworth, and other Ubuntu developers during (and before) Debconf6, I was able to spell out the main criticisms from the Debian perspectives of the way Canonical/Ubuntu is handling things.

Ubuntu Makes Opera 9 available for easy download and installation

Filed under
Ubuntu

After the launch of Ubuntu 6.06 LTS, Canonical is pleased to announce the availability of Opera 9 for Ubuntu. With just a few clicks of the mouse, all Ubuntu users can download and install the latest version of the Opera browser.

Book review: Python How to Program

Filed under
Reviews

Python How to Program is a textbook for a basic course in programming based on the increasingly popular programming language, Python. This book is truly a textbook, right down to the duotone red and black printing, which takes me back to my school days.

Microsoft to offer open source document format

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft on Thursday bowed to pressure from governments to offer new free open source software that will allow its Office suite of programmes to handle documents in rival formats.

Fedora considering default font switch

Filed under
Linux

The Fedora Project is thinking about switching to the DejaVu font family as the default font in Fedora Core. DejaVu is a derivative of the popular Bitstream Vera family, which has not seen any updates since 2003.

Installing Ubuntu (Linux.com training videos)

Filed under
Ubuntu

In our first set of Linux.com training videos we showed you how to download Ubuntu GNU/Linux and run it from a CD without installing it. Today, in two short videos, we install Ubuntu on our hard drive.

Open-Xchange Publishes First in a Series of Position Papers

Filed under
OS

Open-Xchange, Inc. today posted the first in a series of position papers intended to review the forces changing the market for information technology in general and collaborative solutions in specific.

n/a

Printing, theming improved in GTK 2.10 release

Filed under
Software

Originally designed for the GNU Image Manipulation Program, the GTK graphical application development toolkit provides an extensive assortment of widgets and controls for cross-platform software construction. The latest version, GTK 2.10.0, has been officially released with plenty of exciting new features.

Hovsepian: bringing about change at a troubled company

Filed under
Interviews

Ron Hovsepian, Novell’s newly appointed CEO, tells Don Tennant what went wrong at the software vendor in recent years and what needs to change for the better

KDE at FrOSCon 2006

Filed under
KDE

About two weeks ago, several KDE developers gathered at FrOSCon, the Free and Open Source conference in St. Augustin near Bonn, Germany. Representatives of the KDE project gave two talks at the official conference programs, as well as two other talks that directly related to KDE.

Run Zeroconf for Linux in a Snap

Filed under
HowTos

The fond dream of computer users everywhere is to plug in their computers and watch as networking automagically sets itself up. Gnarly old network admins who are accustomed to keeping a tight grip on their realms tend to be resistant to the whole idea. Zeroconf is coming to Linux.

Researcher Promises Browser Bug-A-Day

Filed under
Security

A security researcher has promised to release one browser vulnerability each day for the next month as part of his self-proclaimed "Month of Browser Bugs."

Open source lobby a voice in EU patent consultations

Filed under
OSS

Open source software developers are second only to corporations in voicing opinions in a consultation process about the future of Europe's patent regime, the European Commission said Wednesday.

Open source and SOA to redefine software landscape

Filed under
OSS

The "four horsemen" of commoditisation - service oriented architecture (SOA), open source, software as a service and offshoring - will lead to cheaper prices and a radical change in enterprise software landscape of the future.

Review: Virtuozzo for Linux 3.0

Filed under
Reviews

Virtualization is sweeping the nation. Well, maybe not the nation, but it's a big hit with data centers and organizations that need to consolidate systems and streamline management. With so many virtualization applications on the market, which one to choose? SWsoft's Virtuozzo is strong contender.

The End User: Firefox users decide fate

Filed under
Moz/FF

For a software company that is rapidly cutting into Microsoft's share of the Web browser market, Mozilla Corp. has a particularly unimpressive European headquarters.

Sun to sink in the west?

Filed under
Misc

Sun Microsystems is in deep trouble.

So say a number of analysts.

Also: Scott McNealy's Still Got Game

Novell Innovation in Linux Education Drives New Learning Options

Filed under
SUSE

Novell today announced two new innovative programs for Linux training designed to promote education around open source. Novell unveiled its “Train the Teacher” series, the industry's first free week-long boot camp for Linux* educators.

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More in Tux Machines

Browsing the web with Min, a minimalist open source web browser

Does the world need another web browser? Even though the days of having a multiplicity of browsers to choose from are long gone, there still are folks out there developing new applications that help us use the web. One of those new-fangled browsers is Min. As its name suggests (well, suggests to me, anyway), Min is a minimalist browser. That doesn't mean it's deficient in any significant way, and its open source, Apache 2.0 license piques my interest. Read more

Security: Patches, FUD and Voting Machines

  • libssh 0.8.4 and 0.7.6 security and bugfix release

    libssh versions 0.6 and above have an authentication bypass vulnerability in the server code. By presenting the server an SSH2_MSG_USERAUTH_SUCCESS message in place of the SSH2_MSG_USERAUTH_REQUEST message which the server would expect to initiate authentication, the attacker could successfully authentciate without any credentials.

  • A Cybersecurity Weak Link: Linux and IoT [Ed: Blaming "Linux" for companies that put default passwords on all their products? Windows has back doors.]
  • Undetectably bypass voting machines' anti-tamper mechanism with a bit of a soda-can

    But University of Michigan grad student Matt Bernhard has demonstrated that he can bypass the tamper-evident seals in seconds, using a shim made from a slice of a soda can. The bypass is undetectable and doesn't damage the seal, which can be resecured after an attacker gains access to the system.

  • Security Seals Used to Protect Voting Machines Can Be Easily Opened With Shim Crafted from a Soda Can

    Bernhard, who is an expert witness for election integrity activists in a lawsuit filed in Georgia to force officials to get rid of paperless voting machines used in that state, said the issue of security ties and seals came up in the lawsuit earlier this year when Fulton County Elections Director Richard Barron told the court that his Georgia county relies on tamper-evident metal and plastic ties to seal voting machines and prevent anyone with physical access to the machines from subverting them while they sit in polling places days before an election.

    [...]

    He noted that defeating ties and seals in non-tamper-evident ways isn’t the only method to wreak havoc on an election in Michigan. The state has a unique law that prohibits ballots from being used in a recount if the number of voters doesn't match the number of ballots cast at a precinct or if the seal on a ballot box is broken or has a different serial number than what it should have. Someone who wanted to wreak havoc on an election or alter an election outcome in Michigan could purposely tamper with ballot box seals in a way that is evident or simply replace them with a seal bearing a different serial number in order to get ballots excluded from a recount. The law came into sharp relief after the 2016 presidential election when Green Party candidate Jill Stein sought to get a statewide recount in Michigan and two other critical swing states and found that some precincts in Wayne County couldn't be recounted because the number of voters who signed the poll books—which get certified with a seal signed by officials—didn't match the number of ballots scanned on the voting machines.

OSS: Hedera Hashgraph, Service Providers, and Renaming the Bro Project

  • Hedera Hashgraph Distributed Ledger Technology Shares New Open-Source SDK [Ed: Hedera needs to delete GitHub, however, as the new head of GitHub killed Java projects like Hedera's]
    Hedera Hashgraph, one of the DApp facilitators within the blockchain industry recently announced that it has released its Software Development Kit (SDK) in Java.
  • Service Providers Should Adapt to Open Source World
    Finding differing opinions on open source with the telecom industry isn't hard to do, especially where orchestration is concerned. That's why a panel discussion on open source and MANO at the Light Reading NFV-Carrier SDN event in Denver seemed an odd place to find such outspoken agreement on that topic, but there it was. Four smart guys, none shy with their opinions, all seemed to agree on key points around open source, the need for standards, the role of vendors and the lack of internal software skills. But they also agreed that telecom service providers are struggling a bit to understand how to proceed in an open source world and still need some fundamental internal changes.
  • Renaming the Bro Project
    More than 20 years ago I chose the name "Bro" as "an Orwellian reminder that monitoring comes hand in hand with the potential for privacy violations", as the original Bro paper put it. Today that warning is needed more than ever ... but it's clear that now the name "Bro" is alas much more of a distraction than a reminder. On the Leadership Team of the Bro Project, we heard clear concerns from the Bro community that the name "Bro" has taken on strongly negative connotations, such as "Bro culture". These send a sharp, anti-inclusive - and wholly unintended and undesirable - message to those who might use Bro. The problems were significant enough that during BroCon community sessions, several people have mentioned substantial difficulties in getting their upper management to even consider using open-source software with such a seemingly ill-chosen, off-putting name.

Back End: Apache Kafka, 'Serverless'