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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 16 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

HP To Certify Suse Linux For Notebooks

Filed under
Hardware
SUSE

Hewlett-Packard will ensure that the operating system works on several of its notebook models by year-end.

It's Official: 'To Google' Is Grammatically Correct

Filed under
Google

Everyone seems to be content with making "google" a generic term except the search company that invented the name. "To google" has caught on to such a degree that Merriam-Webster decided to include it as a transitive verb in the upcoming new edition of its dictionary.

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Gaming in Kubuntu

Filed under
Gaming
Ubuntu
HowTos

I was able to get the Gaming part of the Kubuntu How-to done. Half-Life 2 is really a fun First person shooter. I'll show you how to play it in Linux with a little help from our friends at Transgaming.com. With Half-Life 2 under your belt, how about loading a game that runs native linux code? The Kubuntu How-to continues with loading Quake 4.

Mandriva offers online Linux training

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva has announced a set of online, tutored training classes aimed at satisfying the growing demand for Linux skills among both businesses and individuals. The company says the training classes are adaptable to a variety of learning speeds and knowledge levels.

Perl Coders Get New GTK+ Release

Filed under
Software

Programmers on Perl and other languages can take advantage of the latest stable release of the GTK+ toolkit to facilitate rapid application development.

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Test Your Knowledge of Ubuntu Topics

Filed under
Ubuntu

As reviewed last month, the latest Linux certification to go live is that of Ubuntu Professional. To earn this certification, you must first become LPI certified at Level I (LPIC Sleepy, and then pass an additional exam. The following questions are intended to allow you to test your knowledge of the topic and make certain you are ready for this certification. Good luck!

ODF Faithful Tell Microsoft to Cut The FUD

Filed under
OSS

Microsoft's pledge to provide open-source plug-ins that form a bridge between the Open Document Format (ODF) and its own Open XML format caused a stir among standards experts from companies that back ODF.

Beginner Linux Tips

Filed under
HowTos

Recently the subject of beginners and Linux has come up here on TNL and I agreed to post a few thoughts on things people new to Linux may want to consider before striking out to find a distribution and installing it.

Hosting multiple websites with Apache2

Filed under
HowTos

One of the most common Apache2 questions I've seen on Debian mailing lists is from users who wonder how to host multiple websites with a single server. This is very straightforward, especially with the additional tools the Debian package provides.

Donate to advertise OpenOffice.org

Filed under
OSS

Following the successful community-based marketing efforts of www.spreadfirefox.com to raise awareness of the FireFox browser, another group is planning a similar campaign to market the OpenOffice.org office suite.

OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications

Filed under
OSS

If you ask me, one of the widely used software at any time - if you discount the web browser and the text editor - would be a word processor. But all these applications (baring the open source ones) encourage their users in saving the files in their own unique file formats. So a need was felt in various quarters to develop and promote an open file format for saving office documents.

CENTOS 4.3 Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

CentOS 4 is built using the same source code as the industry-leading Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, and version 4.3 is commensurate with RHEL 4 update 3. Released in March of this year, CentOS 4.3 contains all previously issued bug fixes and updates. CentOS alone fills the huge gap between Fedora Core and Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

10 Things I Love About KDE

Filed under
KDE

In no particular order, here are ten things I love about KDE. This list includes applications that run under KDE, so I’m including them here. So, KDE things and KDE apps.

A scanner for wireless interlopers

Filed under
HowTos

Wireless security firm Network Chemistry recently released a cross-platform, free software security tool called RogueScanner in conjunction with its wireless network protection package RFprotect. RogueScanner, licensed under the GPL and the latest of three free software security modules available from Network Chemistry, allows you to monitor your network for rogue wireless devices. Release 1.0 comes in both Windows and Linux versions.

Stable kernels 2.6.16.24 and 2.6.17.4 released

Filed under
Linux

The 2.6.16.24 and 2.6.17.4 stable kernels are available. They add a single patch fixing a local privilege escalation vulnerability in the prctl() system call. More Here and Here.

Hardware Vendors Missing Open-source Opportunity

Filed under
OSS

Enterprising hardware hackers managed another coup this week, having successfully installed a version of the open source DD-WRT firmware on the latest revision of the Linksys WRT54G wireless router. Linksys still markets a Linux-powered version of the router, now known as the WRT54GL. But the custom firmware community sees this as a halfhearted acknowledgment of its efforts, at best. At worst, it sees Linksys as thumbing its nose at some of its staunchest supporters. But why does it have to be this way?

Negroponte: $100 laptops due next year

Filed under
Hardware

M.I.T. Media Lab co-founder Nicholas Negroponte showed off the latest prototype of the US$100 computer to a gathering of educators in San Diego Thursday.

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More in Tux Machines

AMD Dual EPYC 7601 Benchmarks - 9-Way AMD EPYC / Intel Xeon Tests On Ubuntu 18.10 Server

Arriving earlier this month was a Dell PowerEdge R7425 server at Phoronix that was equipped with two AMD EPYC 7601 processors, 512GB of RAM, and 20 Samsung 860 EVO SSDs to make for a very interesting test platform and our first that is based on a dual EPYC design with our many other EPYC Linux benchmarks to date being 1P. Here is a look at the full performance capabilities of this 64-core / 128-thread server compared to a variety of other AMD EPYC and Intel Xeon processors while also doubling as an initial look at the performance of these server CPUs on Ubuntu 18.10. Read more

OSS Leftovers

  • New FIDO2 Security Key Will Be Open Source
    A new security key solution is poised to further extend the reach of the FIDO Alliance’s new FIDO2 authentication standard. Called “Solo”, the security key is currently in the works from San Francisco-based SoloKeys, which currently has a Kickstarter campaign underway to support the product. Like other prominent security key solutions, Solo is designed to plug into a computer or laptop’s USB port, allowing the user to confirm with an authenticating service that they are physically present at the device by pressing a button on the key.
  • IOTA (MIOTA) – Biilabs launches GDPR compliant open-source implementation of TangleID
    The rise of IOTA as a top DLT continues. Earlier this year, the city of Taipei announced that they were using the IOTA tangle in implementing their smart city project. The project has largely been a success in implementing a decentralized digital identity system that runs on the IOTA tangle. That’s a major plus towards the growth of the IOTA ecosystem, and gives a huge intrinsic value to the IOTA coin. However, the best news is that this system is now open source. This means that it can be applied to any other city all across the world.
  • Open Source Healthcare Journal Preview at the Connected Health Conference in Boston
    The debut issue of the Open Source Healthcare Journal, a magazine advocating innovative open-source solutions in health, will be available for preview by over 2,000 technology innovators and healthcare providers at the Connected Health Conference at the Seaport World Trade Center in Boston, October 17-19. The Open Source Healthcare Journal's forward-looking point of view is the perfect match for the industry-leading conference, known for provocative discussions on the future of tech-enabled health. The first issue of the journal — published by GoInvo, a healthcare design studio located in Arlington, Massachusetts — features a Q&A with digital health leader and best-selling author Eric Topol, MD as well as articles by Jane Sarasohn-Kahn of HealthcareDIY and Juhan Sonin of MIT and GoInvo.
  • Hedera Hashgraph releases open source SDK
    Hedera Hashgraph, the public distributed ledger that enables globally decentralized applications recently announced the public release of the Hedera SDK in Java. The SDK is open source under an Apache 2 license. With the SDK, developers can now begin to develop Hedera-based applications for use on the Hedera platform.
  • 4 [free] open-source network monitoring tools
    Just as with commercial, for-pay monitoring software, there are open-source options that have varying features, and the goal of an enterprise is to find the best fit for its environment. That’s where this downloadable PDF package of reviews can help. It evaluates four popular free, open-source network-monitoring platforms – Icinga, Nagios, Observium and Zabbix – highlighting pros and cons and giving enough context that this bundle can serve as a guide for IT pros seeking advice.
  • Open Source MANO Needs a Reality Check
    So what's next? Another ONAP update is due soon (in November, dubbed Dublin) but that will only cover up some of the cracks. But you know what -- that's OK! No one actually expects an open source development comprising millions of lines of code to be made useful in a blink of an eye, or even a few months. Iterative progress and a very clear indication of the state of documentation, exactly which modules might be ready to be either used by an operator's team or considered for "industrialization" by a vendor and even highlighting areas where more community activity would all be useful and not at all damaging: Promoting ONAP as "ready to deploy" currently invites suspicion, because that suggests 100% readiness and that's very far from reality.
  • Is Open Source the Right Approach for NFV Orchestration?
    Once upon a time there was a maharaja who decided to raise a baby elephant as a pet (stick with me…). As the elephant grew, it became more and more expensive to feed and created such a mess that eventually the maharaja told his courtiers that he was gifting them the elephant out of the generosity of his heart. In return they would have to look after the elephant and bring it back to him when it was a bit more mature and stable enough for him to ride. Some might say that, in the context of NFV MANO (management and orchestration), the elephant is Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) and the maharaja is AT&T Inc. (NYSE: T). But that would be unfair. In reality there are two maharajas -- AT&T and China Mobile Ltd. (NYSE: CHL) -- and two elephants that have been merged into a six-legged Loxodonta with two tails and three tusks. (See MANO Marriage: ECOMP, OPEN-O Converge as ONAP.)
  • Nuclear Reactor Startup Transatomic Power going Open Source after Closure
    It seldom happens that certain circumstances do not allow one idea to prosper as planned. But Open Source can solve that issue, once the idea is shared with the world. Others can take on that work, build upon and keep improving it. This recently happened with Transatomic Power (founded by Mark Massie and Dr. Leslie Dewan in April 2011), a Nuclear Startup that introduced a brand new design of its own Nuclear Reactor that is a lot more efficient than conventional ones. As they haven’t been able to build it within their targeted timeframe, they announced suspending operations on September 25, 2018. But declaring their designs Open Source is certainly going to help change things for the better.
  • Play Your Favorite Old Web Games Now, Chrome 71 May Break Them
    hen Google rolled out Chrome 66 earlier this May, it offered a tweak that pleased almost everyone by muting sites that would play sound automatically. Unfortunately, it also ended up breaking several projects’ audio. This meant that a variety of different media, from popular web games to some of Google’s own projects effectively had their audio broken beyond repair. Users were understandably upset, and in response to an overwhelming amount of backlash, Google retained the browser alteration that blocked autoplaying video and audio, but decided to push back the feature’s application for games and web apps to Chrome 71, which is set to debut in December.
  • GCC Is Preparing To End Support For Solaris 10
    Solaris 10, what may will argue as the last "good" Solaris operating system release before Sun Microsystems fell under control of Oracle, may soon see its support deprecated by the GCC compiler stack. With upstream Solaris 10 soon reaching its end of life and an increasing number of failures/issues coming up when testing the GNU Compiler Collection on Solaris 10, the GNU toolchain developers are looking at obsoleting that support.

Servers: Nginx, Container, and Kubernetes on AWS

  • Nginx Updates Web Server Application Platform
    Nginx Inc. held its annual customer conference on Oct. 9-10, announcing a series of updates to its namesake Application Platform. While Nginx was originally best known for the open source nginx web server, Nginx Inc. has expanded in recent years to enable a larger set of web application capabilities, with a series of different products. Nginx first announced its Application Platform in September 2017, which includes the Nginx Plus Application service combined with the Nginx Controller management and Nginx Unit application server.
  • Container-native, it’s now ‘a thing’
    San Francisco headquartered software analytics company New Relic has acquired Belgian container and microservices monitoring firm CoScale. Neither firm is essentially open source in its core approach, but the technologies being interplayed here essentially are. CoScale’s expertise is in monitoring container and microservices environments, with a special focus on Kubernetes — the open source container orchestration system for automating deployment, scaling and management of containerized applications originally designed by Google.
  • Open source tool simplifies Kubernetes on AWS
    AWS Service Operator relies on the Kubernetes controller pattern, which packages various basic tasks, integrates disparate components and keeps an application in a desired state. This information is stored on a single API server for the Kubernetes and AWS assets, with AWS services defined as custom resources, and a user can potentially deploy the entire lifecycle process through a single YAML manifest. [...] Etc.io, a Dallas-based consulting firm, doesn't use any AWS container services at scale, and relies primarily on Google Container Engine. AWS Service Operator could make it more convenient to use Kubernetes on AWS, but it doesn't help organizations that want to move to a microservices architecture that doesn't rely on a single vendor, said E.T. Cook, managing partner at Etc.io.

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