Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 26 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 06/12/2012 - 5:43am
Story GIMP Magazine – Issue 2 srlinuxx 05/12/2012 - 10:12pm
Story KDE Ships December Updates: 4.9.4 srlinuxx 05/12/2012 - 10:11pm
Story Can a 7 year old install Fedora 18? srlinuxx 05/12/2012 - 10:08pm
Story few howtos: srlinuxx 05/12/2012 - 8:46pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 05/12/2012 - 4:42am
Story Fedora 18 Sneak Peek srlinuxx 05/12/2012 - 12:01am
Story GNOME's Next Step srlinuxx 04/12/2012 - 11:52pm
Story Steve Ballmer's Nightmare... or not srlinuxx 04/12/2012 - 10:44pm
Story Linus Mellows In His Old Age… or not srlinuxx 04/12/2012 - 10:33pm

China's Bet on Linux

Filed under
Linux

As China prepares to become a full member of the World Trade Organization, the Beijing government is trying to prove to the West that it is serious about reducing software piracy. And so government agencies and businesses are turning to Linux.

Fry's $159 Linspire Computer

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

When I opened the local Fry's ad circular, one of the first things I spotted was the ad for a complete PC for $159. As you might guess, this PC for tightwads doesn't run any flavor of the Gatesian OS, instead the system ships with Linspire. We took the plunge and bought one, just to find out if it really could be a viable option.

klik User's FAQ online now

Filed under
Software

klik provides an easy way to download and use software for most major distributions. klik User's FAQ is online now and being added to daily.

How to make millions writing free software

Filed under
OSS

So you want to be an open-source millionaire, do you? What will really determine if your Linux distribution or your content management system, or whatever, will ever bring you a thin-dime has very, very little to do with your code's goodness.

GAIM: Cool and Advanced Features

Filed under
HowTos

Last week, I wrote a small introduction to Gaim, a great chat client written for GTK. The functionality of Gaim has gotten quite advanced, which has made it one of the leading-edge open-source chat clients currently available.

Mozilla Tests Next Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla Firefox 1.5 Release Candidate 1 is available now from the Mozilla Foundation so that testers can make any last-minute fixes before the final code is released.

10 Things I Hate About (U)NIX

Filed under
OS

UNIX was a terrific workhorse for its time, but eventually the old nag needs to be put out to pasture. David Chisnall argues that it's time to retire UNIX in favor of modern systems with a lot more horsepower.

Red Hat leakage

Filed under
OSS

It's a familiar phenomenon - a company becomes successful and, as it does so, some of its brightest stars leave the mother ship to try to re-create that success elsewhere on their own. This is starting to happen with Red Hat. Until OSBC, however, I hadn't realized how fast this was happening.

A Preview of the $100 Laptop

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

It's a clever little thing - I had a hard time putting it down after picking it up. The mockup I saw was about the size of a large paperback book running a customized Red Hat distro to the processor and hardware specifications of the machine.

Tsunami-inspired FSF award focuses on humanity

Filed under
OSS

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) has announced a new annual award that honours the use of free software in "the service of humanity".

On the 15th birthday of the WWW, a look back

Filed under
Web

In November of 1990, Tim Berners-Lee, a researcher at Europe's CERN Particle Physics Laboratory, invented the very first web server and web browser. The web developed in a unique fashion, due to conditions unlikely to be repeated today.

Open source turns money-spinner

Filed under
OSS

Open source code, written by a community of thousands of software developers, has always been made freely available. But there are ways of making money from it, as David Reid finds out in Amsterdam.

Learning From Google

Filed under
Web

The top executives at Google recently admitted that they kind of let their employees invent and develop whatever they think is cool and the company has no problem putting it online to see what happens.

Global channel boss parts company with Novell

Filed under
Misc

Mark Hardardt, Novell's VP and general manager for partners and channels, has parted company with the software vendor.

AZ - Next hotbed of IT

Filed under
Web

Following in Intel's and Google's footsteps, EBAY plans to build a data center in Phoenix and hopes to have it open next year.

Helping Save the World

Filed under
Linux

Linux is saving the world.

Yes, you read that right. I wrote "is saving." Not "will save" or "has a chance to save."

Nope.

Is. Saving.

KOffice Meets the Users

Filed under
KDE

Are you using KOffice? What are you using KOffice for? Why did you decide to use KOffice? What are your main problems? We want to reach our users directly and ask them what they think.

Linux loses its religion

Filed under
Linux

EERO TEERIKORPI, who runs Continuent told us yesterday that the religious fervour that used to grip Open Source advocates has largely abated as the software matures and has become pervasive.

MyahOS 1.1 - Moving on up

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

MyahOS 1.1 was released less than a week ago and already it's gaining some momentum. The latest news on this wonderful slackware-based operating system is its new listing on Distrowatch. Being recognized and listed on distrowatch not only validates a developer's efforts, but also brings in more focus and users to an os. It's quite prestigious and an honor to be included in Distrowatch's listings considering there are still approximately 100 distros still waiting. MyahOS is quite deserving of this listing and today we are going to share with you some of those reasons.

Setting up your own APT repository with upload support

Filed under
HowTos

We've previously covered setting up your own repository for the Debian's apt-get system, but we didn't cover managing automatic uploads. Thankfully this is a simple task with the reprepro, and dupload tools and a small amount of scripting.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Wayland, Radeon, Mir, Vulkan

  • Igalia Continues Working On Wayland & Accelerated Media Decode In Chromium On Linux
    Months ago we had reported on Igalia's efforts for improving hardware video/media acceleration on the Chromium browser stack for Linux and getting Chromium ready for Wayland but it's been relatively quiet since then with no status updates. Fortunately, a Phoronix reader pointed to a fresh round of ongoing work in this space. Igalia is working on supporting the V4L2 VDA (Video Decode Acceleration) on the Linux desktop for video/image decode of H.264, VP8, VP9, etc. Up to now the V4L2 VDA support was just used on ARM and under Chrome OS. This is part of the consulting firm's work on delivering first-rate Wayland support for Chromium -- it's a task they have been working on for quite some time.
  • Radeon GPU Profiler 1.2 Released With RenderDoc Interoperability
    AMD's GPUOpen group has announced the release of Radeon GPU Profiler 1.2, it's open-source GPU performance profiler. What's significant about this release is initial interoperability with the popular RenderDoc debugger. Beginning with Radeon GPU Profiler 1.2, there is beta support for allowing a profile be triggered from RenderDoc and for displaying data across the opposite tool along with synchronization between the two utilities.
  • Mir Is Running On Arch Linux; Mir Also Progressing With EGLStreams Support
    Prominent Mir developer Alan Griffiths of Canonical has published his latest weekly update on the status of this Linux display server that continues working on supporting Wayland clients. First up, via the UBports community, Mir is now working on Arch Linux after some basic changes and packaging work. So similar to Ubuntu and Fedora and others, it's now easy to run Mir on Arch Linux if so desired.
  • VK9 - Direct3D 9 Over Vulkan - Hits 26th Milestone
    It's been a wild week for the various Direct3D-over-Vulkan projects with VKD3D 1.0 being released for the initial Direct3D 12 over Vulkan bits from the ongoing work in the Wine project to DXVK continuing to get better at its D3D11-over-VLK support. There's also an update on the VK9 front.
  • Wine-Staging 3.9 Fixes D3D 10/11 Gaming Performance Regressions
    One day after the exciting Wine 3.9 update with VKD3D work and more, the Wine-Staging code has been updated against this latest development release. While since the revival of Wine-Staging earlier this year there has been more than 900 out-of-tree/experimental patches against this Wine branch, with Wine-Staging 3.9 that patch count comes in at 895 patches. It's great to see with more of the changes working their way into upstream Wine after being vetted while other patches are no longer relevant. Also decided this week is that Wine-Staging developers will rely upon the WineHQ bug infrastructure for handling the submission of new Wine-Staging patches so that the work is much easier to track by users/developers in seeing the status and background on proposed patches for the staging tree.

Security: The Microsoft Cyber Attack, VPNFilter, Compliance, Docker

  • « The Microsoft Cyber Attack » : a German Documentary from the ARD on Relations Between Microsoft and Public Administration Now Available in English

    On February 19th, 2018, the German public broadcaster (ARD) aired a documentary on Microsoft relations with public administrations. Part of the inquiry is about the Open Bar agreement between Microsoft and the French ministry of Defense, including interviews of French Senator Joëlle Garriaud-Maylam, Leïla Miñano, a journalist, and Étienne Gonnu of April.

    The documentary is now available in English thanks to Deutsche Welle (DW), the German public international broadcaster, on its Youtube channel dedicated to documentaries : The Microsoft Cyber Attack. It should be noted that April considers itself as a Free software advocate, rather than open source, as the voice-over suggests.

  • VPNFilter UNIX Trojan – How to Remove It and Protect Your Network
    This article has been created to explain what exactly is the VPNFilter malware and how to secure your network against this massive infection by protecting your router as well as protecting your computers. A new malware, going by the name of VPNFilter has reportedly infected over 500 thousand router devices across most widely used brands such as Linksys, MikroTik, NETGEAR as well as TP-Link, mostly used in homes and offices. The cyber-sec researchers at Cisco Talos have reported that the threat is real and it is live, even thought the infected devices are under investigation at the moment. The malware reportedly has something to do with the BlackEnergy malware, which targeted multiple devices in Ukraine and Industrial Control Systems in the U.S.. If you want to learn more about the VPNFilter malware and learn how you can remove it from your network plus protect your network, we advise that you read this article.
  • FBI: Reboot Your Router Now To Fight Malware That Affected 500,000 Routers
  • Compliance is Not Synonymous With Security
    While the upcoming GDPR compliance deadline will mark an unprecedented milestone in security, it should also serve as a crucial reminder that compliance does not equal security. Along with the clear benefits to be gained from upholding the standards enforced by GDPR, PCI DSS, HIPAA, and other regulatory bodies often comes a shift toward a more compliance-centric security approach. But regardless of industry or regulatory body, achieving and maintaining compliance should never be the end goal of any security program. Here’s why:
  • Dialing up security for Docker containers
    Docker containers are a convenient way to run almost any service, but admins need to be aware of the need to address some important security issues. Container systems like Docker are a powerful tool for system administrators, but Docker poses some security issues you won't face with a conventional virtual machine (VM) environment. For example, containers have direct access to directories such as /proc, /dev, or /sys, which increases the risk of intrusion. This article offers some tips on how you can enhance the security of your Docker environment.

Programming: Fonts, Jupyter, and Open Source FPGAs

  • 11 Best Programming Fonts
    There are many posts and sites comparing fonts for programming and they are all amazing articles. So why I repeated the same subject here? Since I always found myself lost in dozens of fonts and could not finger out which one was best for me. So today I tried many fonts and picked up the following fonts for you. These fonts are pretty popular and easy to get. And most importantly, all these fonts are FREE!
  • New open-source web apps available for students and faculty
    Jupyter is an open source web environment for writing code and visualizing data. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly popular across a wide range of academic disciplines. [...] JupyterHub is a variation of the Jupyter project, which adds support for user account management and enterprise authentication. The TLT instance allows students and faculty to log in with their credentials for full access to their own Jupyter environment and provides direct access to their Penn State Access Account Storage Space (PASS). Using PASS for storage provided a large persistent storage space that students and faculty were already familiar with and was easily accessible from the local lab systems or their personal devices.
  • An Ultrasound Driver With Open Source FPGAs
    Ultrasound imaging has been around for decades, but Open Source ultrasound has not. While there are a ton of projects out there attempting to create open ultrasound devices, most of this is concentrated on the image-processing side of things, and not the exceptionally difficult problem of pinging a sensor at millions of times a second, listening for the echo, and running that through a very high speed ADC. For his entry into the Hackaday Prize, [kelu124] is doing just that. He’s building an ultrasound board that’s built around Open Hardware, a fancy Open Source FPGA, and a lot of very difficult signal processing. It also uses some Rick and Morty references, so you know this is going to be popular with the Internet peanut gallery. The design of the ultrasound system is based around an iCE40 FPGA, the only FPGA with an Open Source toolchain. Along with this, there are a ton of ADCs, a DAC, pulsers, and a high voltage section to drive the off-the-shelf ultrasound head. If you’re wondering how this ultrasound board interfaces with the outside world, there’s a header for a Raspberry Pi on there, too, so this project has the requisite amount of blog cred.

today's howtos