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About Tux Machines

Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry Tomboy and Dropbox, the Dynamic Duo bigbearomaha 08/12/2011 - 1:44pm
Story Install GNOME 3 (With Mint GNOME Shell Extensions) Or Mate On Ubuntu 11.10 (Oneiric Ocelot) falko 08/12/2011 - 10:28am
Story What’s going on in Fedora QA srlinuxx 08/12/2011 - 12:29am
Story Ubuntu 11.10 without Unity shell shock srlinuxx 08/12/2011 - 12:05am
Story Portable Software Center srlinuxx 07/12/2011 - 10:44pm
Story More Extensions for GNOME srlinuxx 07/12/2011 - 10:36pm
Story KDE Telepathy 0.2 srlinuxx 07/12/2011 - 10:31pm
Blog entry Stop the US government trying to Own the internet.. fieldyweb 07/12/2011 - 9:57pm
Story Trine 2 For Linux Delayed srlinuxx 07/12/2011 - 8:55pm
Story Open Source Total Cost of Ownership 2.0 srlinuxx 07/12/2011 - 8:46pm

Windows vs. Linux in maintenance costs

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Windows and Linux are neck-and-neck when it comes to the cost of maintenance. Analyst Yankee Group questioned 509 companies and organisations and found that the hourly cost of Windows downtime was three- to four-times higher than that of Linux server downtime.

Open-source companies chase steady money

Filed under
OSS

When entrepreneur Byron Sebastian started his company last year, he set his sights on the business software industry's ultimate cash cow: maintenance contracts.

TV may turn four-year-olds into bullies

Filed under
Misc

Young children who watch a lot of television are more likely to become bullies, a new study reveals. The authors suggest the increasingly violent nature of children's cartoons may be to blame. "What I suspect is these violent animated shows are causing kids to become desensitised to violence."

Tiny drives set for space boost

Filed under
Hardware

Hard drives for mobiles and other portable gadgets could store up to a terabyte of data in the next few years, using a century-old recording process. Hitachi has said it can fit 230 gigabits of data per square inch on a disk using "perpendicular recording". Perpendicular recording was pioneered by the late 19th century work of Danish scientist Valdemar Poulsen, who demonstrated magnetic recording with his telegraphone.

Quake IV for QuakeCon 10th anniversary

Filed under
Gaming

For years, the fragging faithful have gathered for what has become Valhalla for worshippers of first-person shooters. The event is known as QuakeCon, and as the gathering of gamers turns 10 this year, Hollenshead states, "We'll have Quake IV multiplayer to play."

Performance Sneak Preview: Intel Dual Core Pentium

Filed under
Hardware

We recently returned from a road trip to discover a very large box waiting for us. In the package was an Intel reference white box system. The system included a motherboard built around the Intel 955X chipset and a 3.2GHz Pentium 4 Extreme Edition model 840. This particular version of the Pentium 4 contains two full processor cores, built around the Prescott architecture. So we rolled up our sleeves, cleared the lab bench off, and began installing benchmarks.

Cyber-Terrorism Analyst Warns Against Complacency

Filed under
Security

Florida-Cyber-security and counterterrorism analyst Roger Cressey on Monday pleaded with IT executives not to underestimate the threat of "national cyber-event" targeting critical infrastructure in the United States.

Google feature incorporates satellite maps

Filed under
Web
Sci/Tech

Online search engine leader Google has unveiled a new feature that will enable its users to zoom in on homes and businesses using satellite images, an advance that may raise privacy concerns as well as intensify the competitive pressures on its rivals.

the world's only blue rose

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Australian and Japanese researchers have demonstrated the application of RNAi technology for gene replacement in plants, developing the world's only blue rose.

Breeders have attempted to make true blue roses over many years, but none have successfully bred roses with blue pigment. In its first commercial application in plants, the CSIRO-developed RNAi technology was used to remove the gene encoding the enzyme dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR) in roses.

'Perpendicular recording' to boost hard drive capacity

Filed under
Hardware

The next generation of personal computers and portable music players could hold 10 times more information than current models, thanks to a different way of writing magnetic data to a hard disc.

How IBM misjudged the PC revolution

Filed under
Misc

Computer giant IBM has been through many changes. Thirty years ago, the US company dominated the information technology market. Now the landscape is very different, with competitors such as Hewlett-Packard and Dell taking it on on equal terms.

But things could have been very different for the company often referred to as 'Big Blue'.

Linux Kernel Denial of Service Vulnerability

Filed under
Linux
Security

Daniel McNeil has reported a vulnerability in the Linux Kernel, which can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

Linux vs. Linux: The Battle for the Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Many Linux advocates claim that Linux is now ready for primetime, stating that even the novice users can get around in Linux without too many headaches. The good news is that Linux seems to have reached a point where it can begin to compete with Microsoft Windows, to an extent. The open-source operating system offers a variety of free software that is equal to and possibly superior to some professional level software for the Windows platform.

Mini Distro Round-Up

Filed under
Reviews

Distributions that can fit on a mini-cd are today's answer to the floppy distros of yesteryear. Those floppy distros were so handy for those quick repairs, setting up a filesystem on a new harddrive, or just killing a Saturday night. Nothing like the satisfaction of overcoming the difficulties getting MuLinux to dial up to the internet or even boot into a mini X. Hal was my favorite though. I still have my Hal floppy. They were just plain fun!

Today we have our mini-distros too, some as small as 50MB. There isn't much of a challenge these days though, just boot and go. With a weekend off from work, I thought I'd get reacquainted with an old friend and hopefully make some new ones. I test drove 5 of the smallest distros I could find and I'll tell you what I discovered.

Sin City Making Big Bucks and Big News

Filed under
Movies

Released April 1, seems Sin City is on the tips of movie goers' and tech heads' tongues everywhere these days. Noted for using mostly cgi on AMD64 machines for it's action scenes, movies goers and comic fans just love the realistic blood and gore entreated.

Samba, Soccer and Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Since the election of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Brazil has gradually become a beachhead for Open Source, and consequently a thorn in Microsoft's side. Amazed by Open Source potential, it could completely undermine Microsoft's monopoly, and it probably will.

Seven Deadly IT Mistakes

Filed under
Misc

Handling change is where many software horror stories emerge. Effective design and testing of processes is essential. Using the latest business process management tools makes this even easier because it allows the business process to be viewed and changes to be managed with confidence.

Spring Forward

Filed under
Misc

For those of us in the States, remember to set your clocks ahead an hour at 2:am or before you go to bed.

Pope's influence includes technology firsts

Filed under
Sci/Tech
Misc

While Pope John Paul II will largely be remembered for his influence on social issues ranging from euthanasia to AIDS, he also earned a place in history as the first pontiff to embrace computer technology.

Pope John Paul II dies in Vatican

Filed under
Obits

Pope John Paul II, the third longest-serving pontiff in history, has died at the age of 84.

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