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Thursday, 20 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story It's time to pay the maintainers Rianne Schestowitz 19/09/2018 - 8:32am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 19/09/2018 - 12:24am
Story Raspberry Pi I/O add-on targets aquaponics and hydroponics Rianne Schestowitz 19/09/2018 - 12:04am
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2018 - 11:46pm
Story New CloudBees Suite Addresses DevOps Gaps in Software Delivery Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2018 - 11:43pm
Story NYU applies open source Google AI to diagnose lung cancer Roy Schestowitz 1 18/09/2018 - 11:40pm
Story Chrome's Latest Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2018 - 11:25pm
Story Everything Is File In Linux - Part 1 Mohd Sohail 18/09/2018 - 9:13pm
Story Mozilla: Firefox Lockbox, Project DeepSpeech, Firefox Reality, Servo Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2018 - 8:39pm
Story The History of Various Linux Distros Roy Schestowitz 18/09/2018 - 8:22pm

Games: Gift of Parthax, Galaxy Champions TV, Shovel Knight: King of Cards, BlockShip Wars, 0°N 0°W

Filed under
Gaming

The world’s biggest curl installations

Filed under
OSS
Web

curl is quite literally used everywhere. It is used by a huge number of applications and devices. But which applications, devices and users are the ones with the largest number of curl installations? I've tried to come up with a list...

I truly believe curl is one of the world's most widely used open source projects.

If you have comments, other suggestions or insights to help me polish this table or the numbers I present, please let me know!

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Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

The Current Linux Performance With 16 ARM Boards

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I provided a fresh look at the latest Linux performance on 22 Intel/AMD systems while for kicking off the benchmarking this week is a look at the current Linux performance on sixteen different ARM single board computers / developer boards from low-end to high-end.

For those curious about the current ARM Linux performance or wanting to compare your own x86/ARM/POWER/MIPS performance to these 16 ARM boards, here are some fresh benchmarks using the latest ARM Linux image releases for these different boards under test. Without going into too old of ARM platforms and based upon what I had available, the sixteen ARM boards for this comparison were...

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Apache SpamAssassin 3.4.2 released

Filed under
Security

On behalf of the Apache SpamAssassin Project Management Committee, I am
very pleased to announce the release of Apache SpamAssassin v3.4.2.
This release contains security bug fixes. A security announcement will
follow within the next 24 hours.

Apache SpamAssassin can be downloaded from
https://spamassassin.apache.org/downloads.cgi and via cpan
(Mail::SpamAssassin).

Our project website is https://spamassassin.apache.org/

Our DOAP is available at https://spamassassin.apache.org/doap.rdf

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International Day Against DRM takes action for a Day Without DRM on September 18th

Filed under
GNU

DRM is the practice of imposing technological restrictions that control what users can do with digital media. DRM creates a damaged good: it prevents you from doing what would be possible without it. This concentrates control over production and distribution of media, giving DRM peddlers the power to carry out massive digital book-burnings and conduct large-scale surveillance over people's media viewing habits.

Organized by the Defective by Design team, IDAD has occurred annually since 2006. Each year, participants take action through protests, rallies, and the sharing of DRM-free media and materials. Participating nonprofits, activist groups, and companies from around the world include the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Open Rights Group, Public Knowledge, the Document Foundation, and others (for a complete list, see: https://dayagainstdrm.org). These groups will share the message by writing about why DRM is harmful, organizing events, and offering discounts on DRM-free media.

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Bulgaria prepares to build its own central code repository

Filed under
Development
OSS

In November, Bulgaria’s state eGovernment agency SEGA (Държавната агенция „Електронно управление“ ДАЕУ) will award a contract for building the country’s open source code repository. SEGA began studying submitted proposals this Tuesday. The repository, to be based on Git, will be hosting source all software newly developed by or for Bulgaria’s public services.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • An "obsessive," "anti-imperialist" Turing Complete computer language with only one command

    Daniel writes, "An obsessive programmer, frustrated with not only the inefficiencies of mainstream OSes like Windows, but what he sees as their 'imperialistic oppression,' built an entire operating system using a subleq architecture. Subleq is a OISC, a language with only a single command. It lacks the most basic features of programming languages, and yet is Turing Complete.

  • PHP 7.3-RC1 Released, Benchmarks Looking Good For This Next PHP7 Update

    Released this week was the first RC milestone for the PHP 7.3 feature update due out before year's end. This weekend I ran some fresh PHP benchmarks looking at its performance.

    The PHP 7.3 release candidate is made up of many fixes ranging from memory corruption and segmentation faults to undefined symbols and other problems. The list of changes can be found via the NEWS entry.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: GIMP 2.10

    GIMP 2.10 landed in Debian Testing a few weeks ago and I have to say I'm very happy about it. The last major version of GIMP (2.8) was released in 2012 and the new version fixes a lot of bugs and improved the user interface.

  • Political strategy game Democracy 4 announced with Linux support

    Positech Games have announced Democracy 4 [Official Site], the next evolution of their political strategy game and it's coming with Linux support. For those who think they can run a country or would like to have a go at it, this is probably the closest you will ever get.

    This is good to see, because we had Democracy 3 that supported Linux, but Democracy 3 Africa did not support Linux. A shame too, because I rather liked what I saw in Democracy 3 which is why I'm quite happy about this news.

Software and howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • 7 Top free & open source web hosting control panel (Cpanel)

    Setting up a website is not an easy task especially when you have to maintain multiple websites including databases and other files. Its become more hectic, when you go for VPS servers or Cloud hosting those are not more than a just bare server machine with some Linux operating system such as CentOS or Ubuntu. Those are website developers or familiar to how to up and run a website on Linux server definitely looking for some kind of free & open source tools to manage a website’s hosting backend.

    To solve such situations we have web hosting control panels or admin panels software those comes really handy and helps to get rid of the command interface for setting up each and everything.

  • Gavi's Song sheet music with TuxGuitar and LilyPond

    A year or two ago I bought Lindsey Stirling’s Album Brave Enough. It’s wonderful all around, but I really fell in love with Gavi’s Song.

    Three weeks ago I took a stab at playing this on my guitar. It’s technically not actually that difficult – After listening to the original and trying to repeat it for several days, I can now actually play through it without too many hiccups (still far from being YouTube’able, though). At least the first two thirds – but what I have is enough to get the feeling across, and it has a proper ending.

  • How to Increase File Upload Size in PHP
  • Simple guide to install PostGreSQL on Ubuntu
  • Combating article theft by delaying RSS feeds

KDE: KDE Repository Proposal, Belated Akademy Coverage, and Krita Interview With Alyssa May

Filed under
KDE
  • Proposal: .editorconfig files in every KDE Repository

    There’s some discussion on D15383 about the use of editorconfig in our sources, I belive that we should have this little file in *all* of our projects (actually I would put this in *every single project that exists*. This is a small file that handles common code conventions per project, for instance the tab vs spaces thing.

  • KDE Akademy 2018

    Yeah I am not in the picture, but I was there! You can find me over on the left there, where several of us were cut off Akademy was held in the lovely city of Vienna, Austria this year. Hats off to the akademy team for a great job!

    This year at akademy I spent much of my time catching up with the Blue Systems team and meeting with the KDE Sysadmin team. I am happy to report Ben Cooksley is real! Due to my flights, I missed the first and last day. It was still a productive akademy. I attended some good sysadmin and KDE Neon BoFs . I also did a bit of volunteering

    Even though I am mostly packaging for Debian directly these days, KDE Neon is still near and dear to my heart. I hope to be able to merge debian packaging into Neon soon so that we can have better collaboration within the team.

    I met with Ben in regards to getting back into sysadmin/CI work. I am working on Appimage tooling for KDE Binary factory to begin. I hope to utilize the craft tooling to make everyone’s lives easier. This of course is on my free time, but do keep an eye out!

  • Krita Interview with Alyssa May

Linux Accessibility For The Visually Impaired – For The Record

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews

Linux Accessibility For The Visually Impaired. I received a comment from Milton asking me about text to speech options in Linux. He also wanted to know what I recommended for audio dictation under Linux. The first option is indeed, using FoSS awesomeness. However the later relies on Google’s Web Speech API. Also, here is that article on controlling your mouse cursor with your webcam and no hands.

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4 scanning tools for the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

While the paperless world isn't here quite yet, more and more people are getting rid of paper by scanning documents and photos. Having a scanner isn't enough to do the deed, though. You need software to drive that scanner.

But the catch is many scanner makers don't have Linux versions of the software they bundle with their devices. For the most part, that doesn't matter. Why? Because there are good scanning applications available for the Linux desktop. They work with a variety of scanners and do a good job.

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Openwashing and EEE, or 'Open' but Actually Proprietary

Filed under
OSS
  • Initial Flatpak support arrives for Windows Subsystem for Linux
  • Aussie banks dragged into the 'open source' era via GitHub

    The open banking Data Standards Body, which is being run by the CSIRO's Data61 unit, is using the online service to manage feedback and comments for the technical standards that will govern the movement of data in the new economy. All decision proposals and final decisions for the open banking standards will be published on GitHub.

  • eBay Replatforming to Kubernetes, Envoy and Kafka: Intending to Open Source Hardware and Software

    eBay have discussed how they are conducting a replatforming initiative across their entire technology stack, which includes building and releasing as open source both the new hardware and software created. Open source is "fueling the transformation" of eBay's infrastructure, and they intend to use cloud native technologies like Kubernetes, Envoy, MongoDB, Docker and Apache Kafka.

    As part of a three-year effort to replatform and modernise their backend infrastructure, eBay has recently announced that they are building their own custom-designed servers "built by eBay, for eBay". The plan also includes making eBay's servers available to the public via open source in the fourth quarter of this year. Although many large scale technical organisations and cloud vendors custom build their own hardware, including Google, AWS and Azure, they do not typically release this as open source. eBay have stated that they "are using servers and hardware that we designed, reducing our dependence on third parties".

Torvalds Apologizes for His ‘Bad Behavior’, Takes a Break from Linux

Filed under
News

No more F-words and angry outbursts from Torvalds anymore? Linux creator Linus Torvalds is taking a break from Linux kernel development in order to take professional help for improving his behavior.
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Security: Windows/NSA Back Doors, Election Cracking, and Open Source Security Podcast

Filed under
Security
  • Cryptocurrency mining attacks using leaked NSA hacking tools are still highly active a year later

    Yet, more than a year since Microsoft released patches that slammed the backdoor shut, almost a million computers and networks are still unpatched and vulnerable to attack.

  • Leaked NSA exploits are still used to infect at least 919K servers with cryptojacking malware [Ed: Microsoft gave the NSA back doors. It was inevitable that crackers who do not work for the US government would get in too.]

    Although Microsoft indicated that they have closed the backdoor used by this ransomware, more computers globally are not fully secured to prevent the infection by the malware. Interestingly, the hackers have shifted their game from asking for ransom and are now infecting new computers with cryptojacking malware.

  • Cybersecurity Is Only 1 Part of Election Security

    The DEF CON 2018 Voting Machine Hacking Village aimed to raise awareness in voting security through a full day of speakers and panel discussions along with a challenge for attendees to hack more than 30 pieces of voting equipment. A partnership with rOOtz Asylum offered youths between 8 and 16 years old an opportunity to hack replicas of the websites of secretaries of state to demonstrate that even hackers with limited years of experience can easily compromise critical systems. The goal was to break as many voting machine pieces as possible in order to draw attention to the vulnerabilities that will be present in the upcoming 2018 elections.

    The focus on election equipment, however, ignores the greater danger caused by hacking into the diverse collection of sensitive information that flows through political campaigns and the electoral process, and using that to influence and sow distrust among voters. While changing a vote or voting results can be traced back to a particular stakeholder, changing people's understanding of facts is far more insidious.

  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 114 - Review of "Click Here to Kill Everybody"

    Josh and Kurt review Bruce Schneier's new book Click Here to Kill Everybody. It's a book everyone could benefit from reading. It does a nice job explaining many existing security problems in a simple manner.

​Linus Torvalds takes a break from Linux

Filed under
Linux

In a surprising move, Linus Torvalds, Linux's creator, is taking a break on his Linux kernel work to work on his behavior to other developers. In a note to the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML), Torvalds wrote, "I need to change some of my behavior, and I want to apologize to the people that my personal behavior hurt and possibly drove away from kernel development entirely."

If you follow the trials and tribulations of Linux's developments, this is mind-blowing. For the almost 30-years Torvalds has been working on the kernel, he's been famous--or infamous--for his outbursts towards programmers and others who didn't meet his high expectations.

Over the decades, Torvalds has torn into security developers, open-source lawyers, and other kernel developers, such as Sage, formerly Sarah, Sharp. Every few months, there would be another four-letter Torvalds eruption. This became publicly accepted, but privately it left bad blood.

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Review: Linux Mint 3 Debian Edition (LMDE 3)

Filed under
Reviews

On the whole, I liked running LMDE 3 a lot. The distribution was easy to set up, I liked the quick access to common tools in the welcome window. The change from ranked upgrades to having the system safeguarded by Timeshift snapshots may make things a little harder for newcomers (it's harder to recover a system than to not have it break in the first place), but the new approach probably offers better security in the long run.

One thing I appreciated about LMDE 3 is that it looks beautiful. I usually don't focus much on a theme, or icon style, but Mint looks incredible to me. Everything is high contrast and attractive. The fonts are a little thin for my taste, but this can be easily changed with a few clicks in the settings panel.

I was a little disappointed the system installer defaults to using ext4 instead of Btrfs. Since Mint recommends and relies on Timeshift for system recovery, and Btrfs snapshots are much more efficient than rsync snapshots, it makes sense to me to use Btrfs by default. On a related note, when Timeshift is set up to use rsync snapshots, the rsync command will drag down system performance for about 20 minutes at a time. Having the snapshots run as a lower priority in the background would have avoided slowing down the desktop once a day.

I would have preferred if LMDE had shipped with MATE instead of Cinnamon. I realize Cinnamon is an in-house desktop project and it makes sense for the Mint developers to focus on using and promoting Cinnamon. However, since I suspect many of the people who want to use the Debian branch over the Ubuntu branch will be doing so for performance reasons, I think MATE would make the sensible default. MATE is lighter than Cinnamon, does not require special video driver/hardware support and will run better in virtual environments. Cinnamon is a solid desktop and I think it looks and performs wonderfully on physical hardware, it just doesn't feel like the optimal choice for people who want to run the lighter, more conservative Debian branch of Mint.

Finally, I want to give credit to the Mint team for integrating Flatpak support into the software manager. It is easy to find Flatpaks without having them blend in with other packages, potentially confusing users. I think Flatpak support was handled well by the Mint team.

On the whole, the above points are minor style preferences for a distribution that I was impressed by. Mint's Debian edition performed smoothly, offered a lot of great software out of the box and was easy to use. I think the Debian branch might be slightly less appealing to beginners than the main, Ubuntu-based edition, but there are few practical differences and most people will probably find either branch works for them. I think LMDE will be a good fit for most people, whether beginners or more experienced users.

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More in Tux Machines

Microsoft Demonstrates Why Proprietary Software Cannot be Trusted

  • This Windows file may be secretly hoarding your passwords and emails
    If you're one of the people who own a stylus or touchscreen-capable Windows PC, then there's a high chance there's a file on your computer that has slowly collected sensitive data for the past months or even years. [...] The handwriting feature is there since Windows 8 which means the vulnerability has been there for many years. However, if you don’t store valuable information like passwords or email on your PC, you aren’t much likely to get affected much.
  • This Windows File Might Be Secretly Collecting Sensitive Data Since Windows 8
    There is a Windows file named WaitList.dat that covertly collects your passwords and email information, with the help of Windows Search Indexer service. Digital Forensics and Incident Response (DFIR) expert Barnaby Skeggs first discovered the information about the file back in 2016 but wasn’t paid much attention. However, in after a new and exclusive interview with ZDNet – it appears that the file, in fact, is reasonably dangerous.

The best editor for PHP developers who work in Linux OS

Every programmer knows that coding is fun! Don't you agree with me? However, to be an absolutely professional PHP developer, we have to know a lot about all the specific details of coding. Selecting the editor you are going to use to happily code is not an easy decision and must be taken unhurriedly. If you are a beginner, you may try a great code editor with a rich functionality and very flexible customization which is known as Atom Editor, the editor of the XXI century. You may say that we have many pretty alternatives available. Read the explanation below, and the introduced information will knock you off! Read more

Android Leftovers

Variscite’s latest DART module taps headless i.MX6 ULZ

Variscite is prepping a headless version of its Linux-friendly DART-6UL module with NXP’s new i.MX6 ULZ SoC, a cheaper version of the i.MX6 UL without display or Ethernet features. Variscite is spinning out yet another pin-compatible version of its 50 x 25mm DART-6UL computer-on-module, this time loaded with NXP’s headless new i.MX6 ULZ variant of the single Cortex-A7 core i.MX6 UL. Due for a Q4 launch, the unnamed module lacks display or LAN support. It’s billed as “a native solution for headless Linux-based embedded products such as IoT devices and smart home sensors requiring low power, low size, and rich connectivity options.” Read more