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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story FreeOffice 2018 Release is Seamlessly Compatible With MS Office on Linux itsfoss 20/05/2018 - 8:35am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 8:30am
Story Doxyqml 0.4.0 Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 7:35am
Story SMTube review - Your train to Youtube Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 7:28am
Story GNOME Development/Developers Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 7:24am
Story Debian Development/Developers Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 7:22am
Story Linux Graphics: AMD and Mesa Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 7:11am
Story FreeBSD 11.2-BETA2 Now Available, DragonFly BSD 5.2.1 Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 7:08am
Story Congratulations to Tesla on Their First Public Step Toward GPL Compliance Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 6:33am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 20/05/2018 - 3:32am

Graphics: Mesa 18.0.4 and More

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 18.0.4

    Mesa 18.0.4 is now available.

    In this release we have:

    r600 driver gets a fix for constant buffer boounds, which fixes rendering bugs
    in Trine and Witcher 1.

    Several fixes for RADV driver: fixes around alpha channel in Pre-Vega, fix in
    multisample image copies, and fixes around multilayer images in compute path.

    For the case of ANV/i965 drivers, also a couple of fixes, all of them around
    ISP. On top, there are a couple of fixes relative to code emission around 16-bit
    integers, and a a fix for a leak in blorp for Gen4 and Gen5.

    Speaking of leaks, there are also fixes for winsys/radeon/amdgpu and
    pipe-loader.gets a couple of patches to fix a couple of leaks.

    SPIR-V part gets a patch to apply OriginUpperLeft to FragCoord.

    Mesa core gets a couple of patches to fix error handling in
    get_framebuffer_parameteriv, and to add missing support for
    glFogiv(GL_FOG_DISTANCE_MODE_NV).

  • Mesa 18.0.4 Released With A Handful Of Bug Fixes

    Mesa 18.1 might be out this weekend but for those riding the Mesa 18.0 stable release series for now, Mesa 18.0.4 is the latest point release.

  • AMD Will Continue Maintaining Multiple Compute Stacks For Linux

    With the great shape that ROCm has been getting into recently for open-source Radeon GPU compute support on Linux including advancing OpenCL support, one might have rightfully assumed that was going to be their centralized compute stack moving forward. It turns out that their PAL-based compute stack will continue to be maintained too.

  • VC5 Gallium3D Driver Becomes V3D, Enabled By Default In Mesa

    What was developed as the VC5 Gallium3D driver is now renamed to V3D and enabled by default in new Mesa 18.2 builds.

    The Broadcom Video Core V driver that was already part of Mesa was renamed to V3D to match the name of the V3D DRM kernel driver. The VC5 to V3D renaming occurred since this driver is already supporting a VideoCore VC6 device, so the VC5 naming was no longer deemed appropriate.

  • VMware 13.3 X.Org Driver Brings DRI3 With Latest Mesa, X.Org Server 1.20 Support

    Usually X.Org DDX driver releases aren't too notable these days with most of the open-source Linux graphics innovations happening elsewhere in the stack, but for those using the VMware graphics virtualization support available through their different virtualization products, the xf86-video-vmware update out today is on the heavier side.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Fantastic kernel patches and where to find them

    I've griped before about kernel development being scattered and spread about. A quick grep of MAINTAINERS shows over 200 git trees and even more mailing lists. Today's discussion is a partial enumeration of some common mailing lists, git trees and patchwork instances. You can certainly find some of this in the MAINTAINERS file.

  • Sprint Joins ORAN Alliance and Linux Foundation Networking Fund

    Sprint is becoming a member of the ORAN Alliance, formerly known as the xRAN Forum, and it is also joining the LF Networking Fund (LNF).

    The two moves signal the operator’s commitment to the open source world. It’s making these inroads prior to its planned merger with T-Mobile. The two companies announced earlier last month that they will merge. The deal, if approved, will close in early 2019.

  • Vulkan 1.1.75 Released With Many Issues Resolved

    It's been almost one month since the Vulkan 1.1.74 debut but now that's been succeeded by Vulkan 1.1.75.

    The Khronos Group has put out Vulkan 1.1.75 this morning as the newest revision to this graphics/compute API. The Vulkan 1.1.75 update doesn't introduce any new extensions, but there are a wide number of issues resolved -- as usual, mostly document clarifications about intended behavior and some fixes.

  • FreeOffice 2018 Release is Seamlessly Compatible With MS Office on Linux

    A few months after the release of the premium SoftMaker 2018 office suite, SoftMaker has just released the latest version of its free office suite, SoftMaker FreeOffice 2018.

    SoftMaker is a premium productivity suite and one of the most viable alternatives to Microsoft Office. FreeOffice is a stripped down version of SoftMaker premium with fewer features than the premium version. You can read about the difference between the features of SoftMaker and FreeOffice here.

  • Colony building sim Maia has a fresh update with a ton of polish & new fancy exterior rendering

    Maia [Official Site], from developer Simon Roth has just been updated with a pretty big update. There's a lot of polish in this update, literally so with a new floor cleaning robot.

    I'll be honest, Maia is one of those games that I've always had a bit of a love/hate relationship with. Mainly because I love the simulation in it and the insane levels of detail, but it has previously been a little on the buggy side. Thankfully, the developer is massively dedicated and each update really has improved the game dramatically. This update is no different, it's made a world of difference.

  • The first stage of removing loot crates from Robocraft is now live

    Robocraft, the free to play, build and battle game just got updated with the first stage planned in a series of updates to remove loot crates.

    With this first initial update, you can no longer buy item crates and you don't get a daily login item crate bonus. While you still get them in other parts of the game, it's a great first step towards it, since the game is now a lot more geared towards having to play it to win it. There's still crates to be earned as you play, but they will remove them gradually with more updates.

  • Linspire Server 2018 Released, Based On Ubuntu 16.04 With Xfce Desktop

    Back in January was the news of Linspire (formerly known as "Lindows") making a comeback and this week marks the release of Linspire Server 2018.

    Linspire/Lindows had previously been focused on just a desktop offering, but PC/OpenSystems acquired the Linspire rights a few months back and now they are spinning up new products. The newly-announced Linspire Server 2018 is based on Ubuntu Server 16.04 and is available for free with a self-support license while the company is also selling commercial support for interested users.

  • openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 Taiwan: Call for proposals is open

    openSUSE.Asia Committee calls for proposals of talks for openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018 held at National Taiwan University of Science and Technology on August 11 and 12. We might have community day on 10th August before the summit.

    openSUSE.Asia Summit is one of the great events for openSUSE community (i.e., both contributors, and users) in Asia. Those who usually communicate online can get together from all over the world, talk face to face, and have fun. Members of the community will share their most recent knowledge, experiences, and learn FLOSS technologies surrounding openSUSE.

  • [Slackware] HandBrake 1.1.0 – now also in a patent-friendly package

    A new release of HandBrake, the video transcoder/ripper. The version 1.1.0 (released last month) comes with a load of enhancements, bug fixes and new features. Read the announcement to get all the details.

    And its GTK+-3 based GUI still compiles on Slackware 14.2. The devs must have done something right. Thank you! Still, it is sad that I can not compile the HandBrake GUI on Slackware 14.1 – or older – due to the GTK+-3 requirement (how I wish that the Qt based GUI was still an option). You could still build the CLI-only variant I suppose. But it might also be a good idea to upgrade to Slackware 14.2 if you thought of running the graphical HandBrake program…

  • Video Channel Updates

    I’ll still keep uploading to YouTube, but ultimately I’d like to make my self-hosted site the primary source for my content. Not sure if I’ll stay with MediaDrop, but it does tick a lot of boxes, and if its easy enough to extend, I’ll probably stick with it. MediaDrop might also be a good platform for viewing the Debian meetings videos like the DebConf videos.

Servers, Buzzwords and Red Hat

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • Containers and microservices and serverless, oh my!

    A new round of buzzword-heavy technologies are becoming relevant to—or at least discussed among—developers, operations professionals, and the tech staff who lead them. Need to come up to speed on the changing cloud and container trends and technologies? If you feel out of the loop, this tech-transfer explainer should provide enlightenment.

    Once upon a time, virtual machines changed how we thought about servers. Then, the cloud changed how we thought about IT. Now, containers have started a new transformation. The latest entry is “serverless”—though I should point out immediately that the term serverless is a misnomer. Future cloud-native applications will consist of both microservices and functions, often wrapped as Linux containers.

    VMs and the cloud enabled DevOps, the practice of developers and IT operations staff collaborating to optimize technology processes. Cloud technologies’ dynamic compute and storage resources made it easier to provision resources. The idea behind DevOps is that developers no longer need to worry about infrastructure because that's taken care of in the background by programs such as Ansible, Chef, and Puppet.

    Then along came containers. Containers use far fewer resources than VMs by using shared operating systems. Containers are also easier to spin up and down when circumstances require it.

  • How a competitive cycling team applies DevOps and agile methods
  • Red Hat Virtualization 4.2 Gains New SDN, High-Performance Features
  • Scaling AMQ 7 Brokers with AMQ Interconnect

    Red Hat JBoss AMQ Interconnect provides flexible routing of messages between AMQP-enabled endpoints, including clients, brokers, and standalone services. With a single connection to a network of AMQ Interconnect routers, a client can exchange messages with any other endpoint connected to the network.

    AMQ Interconnect can create various topologies to manage a high volume of traffic or define an elastic network in front of AMQ 7 brokers. This article shows a sample AMQ Interconnect topology for scaling AMQ 7 brokers easily.

    AMQ Interconnect does not use master-slave clusters for high availability. It is typically deployed in topologies of multiple routers with redundant network paths, which it uses to provide reliable connectivity. AMQ Interconnect can distribute messaging workloads across the network and achieve new levels of scale with very low latency.

    The router accepts AMQP protocol–based connections from clients and creates AMQP connections to brokers or AMQP services. The router classifies incoming AMQP messages and routes the messages between message producers and message consumers.

    A messaging client can make a single AMQP connection into a messaging bus built with routers, and over that connection it can exchange messages with one or more message brokers connected to any router in the network. At the same time, the client can exchange messages directly with other endpoints without involving a broker at all.s

  • Advisory: Red Hat DHCP Client Command Injection Trouble

Devices: AsteroidOS, Android and More

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • AsteroidOS 1.0 Released, Net Neutrality Update, Qt 3D Studio 2.0 Beta Now Available and More

    AsteroidOS 1.0 is now available. Released yesterday, the open-source operating system for smartwatches is finally available after four years in the works. As posted on the AsteroidOS website, "AsteroidOS is built on standard Linux technologies including OpenEmbedded, opkg, Wayland, Qt5, systemd, BlueZ, and PulseAudio. This makes it the ideal platform to build any sort of wearable project you can imagine. Do you want to run Docker on your watch? AsteroidOS can do it. Do you want to run Quake on your watch? AsteroidOS can do that too. The sky is really the limit! Our community welcomes anyone interested in playing with a smartwatch project."

  • Meet AsteroidOS – A potential replacement for Wear OS
  • Logic Supply embedded PCs now available with pre-loaded AWS Greengrass

    Logic Supply is now offering pre-loaded AWS Greengrass software for autonomous edge processing linked to the AWS IoT platform on two of its Linux-based systems: its recent Apollo Lake based CL200 mini-PC and its Kaby Lake enabled MC850 embedded PC.

    Logic Supply announced it has joined Amazon Web Services’ AWS Partner Network (APN), and is certified to offer the Linux-driven AWS Greengrass software for localized edge computing. The first two certified systems are the recent Intel Apollo Lake based CL200 Edge Device mini-PC and last year’s high-end MC850 embedded computer running Kaby Lake or Skylake CPUs.

  • New Cherry Trail Pico-ITX SBC also available in 7- and 10-inch touch-panels

    Estone Technology (AKA Habey) has launched a Linux-friendly “EMB-2610” Pico-ITX SBC built on an Atom x5-Z8350 with WiFi, BT, and optional PoE, and also introduced 7- and 10-inch touch-panel PCs built on it.

    Over the last decade, Toledo, Ohio based Estone Technology has sold products under either the Estone or Habey label. It’s now integrating the operations and websites under the Estone brand. The product page for the new EMB-2610 Pico-ITX SBC, for example, points to a Habey EMB-2610 datasheet. The EMB-2610 also powers new 7-inch PPC-6607 and 10.1-inch PPC-6610 touch-panel PCs (see farther below).

  • OnePlus 6 Launched; Features A 6.28-inch Screen With Notch And Full Glass Body

    The highly-awaited OnePlus 6 has been launched by the Chinese company OnePlus. Latest of the segment, OnePlus 6 features a 6.28-inch Optic AMOLED display, a notorious notch and carries the price tag of $529 for the starting variant.

    The phone can be availed in three colors namely Mirror Black, Midnight Black and the limited edition Silk White. Under the hood, you will find the Qualcomm Snapdragon 845 along with two options of RAM (6GB and 8GB).

  • How Android P’s Gesture Navigation Works

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Coreboot 4.8 Released With 17 New Motherboards Supported

    While many Coreboot users just habitually ride the latest Git code, for those sticking to official stable releases, Coreboot 4.8 was released today.

  • Extensions in Firefox 61

    Firefox 60 is now in the Release channel, which means that Firefox 61 has moved from Nightly to the Beta channel. As usual, Mozilla engineers and volunteer contributors have been hard at work, landing a number of new and improved WebExtensions API in this Beta release.

    Before getting to the details, though, I’d like to note that the Firefox Quantum Extensions Challenge has come to an end.  The contest was a huge success and the judges (myself included) were overwhelmed with both the creativity and quality of the entrants.  A huge thank you to everyone who submitted an extension to the contest and congratulations to the winners.

  • Enigmail 2.0.4 available - better protection against Efail

     

    Enigmail now discovers if GnuPG prints a warning message about missing MDC (Modification Detection Code) for old algorithms like CAST5 and treats it like a hard failure. Such a message will no longer be displayed.

  • Built-in Sharding for PostgreSQL

    Built-in sharding is something that many people have wanted to see in PostgreSQL for a long time. It would be a gross exaggeration to say that PostgreSQL 11 (due to be released this fall) is capable of real sharding, but it seems pretty clear that the momentum is building. The capabilities already added are independently useful, but I believe that some time in the next few years we're going to reach a tipping point. Indeed, I think in a certain sense we already have. Just a few years ago, there was serious debate about whether PostgreSQL would ever have built-in sharding. Today, the question is about exactly which features are still needed.

    If you haven't followed progress in this area closely, I highly recommend that you read the Built-in Sharding page which my colleague Bruce Momjian wrote up for the PostgreSQL wiki in December of 2016 as well as the very interesting slides which Etsuro Fujita, Kyotaro Horiguchi, Masahiko Sawada, and Amit Langote presented at PGCONF.ASIA 2016. (Note that the atomic commit feature mentioned in that presentation did not make it into PostgreSQL 11.)

  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS is now on Windows 10's Microsoft Store [Ed: There's more press/media coverage this week about Ubuntu running under Microsoft WSL than there is about Ubuntu running on its own. I guess/venture to guess why... and one needs to follow the money, e.g. ad money.]
  • [Older] OpenBSD 6.3 : why and how
  • Licenses for data

    The amount of available data is growing larger these days, to the point that some data sets are far larger than any one company or organization can create and maintain. So companies and others want to share data in ways that are similar to how they share code. Some of those companies are members of the Linux Foundation (LF), which is part of why that organization got involved in the process of creating licenses for this data. LF VP of Strategic Programs Mike Dolan came to the 2018 Legal and Licensing Workshop (LLW) to describe how the Community Data License Agreement (CDLA) came about.

    The kinds of data affected are for applications like machine learning, blockchains, AI, and open geolocation, he said. Governments, companies, and other organizations want to share their data and the model they want to follow is the one they have learned from open-source software. So the idea behind the CDLA is to share data openly using what has been learned about licensing from decades of sharing source code.

  • LLVM 5.0.2 Released With Spectre Variant Two Mitigation

    For those that haven't yet upgraded to LLVM 6.0 stable, the long overdue LLVM 5.0.2 is now available.

    LLVM 5.0.2 was due out at the end of March while now at the middle of May this point release has materialized. What makes this new LLVM 5.0 stable update important is that it contains the compiler-side Retpoline support for Spectre Variant Two mitigation. This was already found in LLVM 6.0 and then back-ported to LLVM 5.0 and now available in this latest point release.

Software: Neofetch, QOwnNotes, FreeOffice, LabPlot, Elisa

Filed under
Software
  • Display System Information On Linux With Neofetch (Version 4.0.0 Available)

    Neofetch is a terminal-based system information tool that displays not only information about your desktop settings, but also about your operating system and hardware, like the CPU and GPU, system memory, kernel, uptime, and much more.

    What you see in the screenshot is not all Neofetch can show. You can customize it to show a lot more information - from CPU temperature to public IP, disk information, currently playing song, and so much more.

    Neofetch can even display your current wallpaper instead of the ASCII OS logo if it meets the requirements:

  • QOwnNotes 18.05.3

    QOwnNotes is a open source (GPL) plain-text file notepad with markdown support and todo list manager for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, that (optionally) works together with the notes application of ownCloud (or Nextcloud). So you are able to write down your thoughts with QOwnNotes and edit or search for them later from your mobile device (like with CloudNotes) or the ownCloud web-service. The notes are stored as plain text files and you can sync them with your ownCloud sync client. Of course other software, like Dropbox, Syncthing, Seafile or BitTorrent Sync can be used too.

  • FreeOffice 2018 Released with “Complete Support” For Microsoft Office Files

    SoftMaker FreeOffice 2018 is now available to download for Windows and Linux.

    Developed by Germany-based software company SoftMaker, the office suite is both free to download and free to use — so if you’re on the hunt for a free Microsoft Office alternative for Linux you’ll almost certainly want to check it out.

  • LabPlot Support for live data

    Coming close to the next release of LabPlot, the last new feature in this release that we want to introduce is the support for live data. This feature developed by Fábián Kristóf during “Google Summer of Code 2017” program. In this context, the support for live data refers to the data that is frequently changing and the ability of the application to visualize this changing data.

    Prior to the upcoming release, the only supported workflow in LabPlot was to import the data from an external file into LabPlot’s data containers and to do the visualization. On data changes, the user needed to re-import again. With LabPlot 2.5 we introduced the “Live Data Source” object that is “connected” to the actual data source and that takes care of re-reading the changed data according to the specified options.

  • News about Elisa

    Elisa is a music player developed by the KDE community that strives to be simple and nice to use. We also recognize that we need a flexible product to account for the different workflows and use-cases of our users.

Talos II Lite

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Raptor Launching Talos II Lite POWER9 Computer System At A Lower Cost

    For those that have been interested in the Talos II POWER-based system that is fully open-source down to the firmware but have been put off by its cost, Raptor Computer Systems today announced the Talos II Lite that is a slightly cut-down version of the Talos II Workstation.

    The Talos II Lite is still a very competent beast of a system and features a single POWER9 CPU socket, EATX chassis, 500W ATX power supply, and is sold as a barebones package. The Talos II Lite motherboard supports up to the 22-core POWER9 CPU, eight DDR4 ECC RAM slots, one PCI Express 4.0 x16 slot, one PCI Express 4.0 x8 slot, dual Gigabit Ethernet, four USB 3.0 ports, and one USB 2.0 port.

  • A little Talos of your very own

    Overall, that $3300 really does translate into greatly improved expandability in addition to the beefier power supplies, and thus it was never really an option for my needs personally. Maybe my mini:Quad analogy wasn't so off base. But if you want to join the POWER9 revolution on a budget and give Chipzilla the finger, as all right-thinking nerds should, you've now got an option that only requires passing a kidneystone of just half the size or less. It ships starting in July.

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Enhanced OpenShift JBoss AMQ container image for production

    As a Solution Architect at Red Hat, I had the opportunity to run an « JBoss AMQ on OpenShift workshop » some weeks ago at a customer site. Working with AMQ for years outside OpenShift and having just played with the containerized version, I was astonished that some features were already there but not documented while some others were simply missing.

    This post is a walk-through some enhancements I’ve made to Red Hat JBoss AMQ container image in order to meet my customer requirements. It goes through some topics like: adding a monitoring layer to AMQ, making configuration management across environments easier and explaining source-2-image process and use-cases for AMQ. By the way, if you’re interested on monitoring topic on Red Hat integration solutions, I recommend having a look at Bruno Meseguer excellent blog post that was an inspiration for reproducing on AMQ what was done on Fuse.

  • Red Hat brings cloud-native capabilities to software partner ecosystem

    Red Hat, the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, has introduced Kubernetes Operators to the Red Hat OpenShift ecosystem, providing a simplified path for software partners to ultimately deliver tested and validated Kubernetes applications on the industry’s most comprehensive enterprise Kubernetes platform.

  • Red Hat’s AI Strategy

    Daniel Riek leads the AI Center of Excellence in the CTO Office at Red Hat, which is tasked with advancing the adoption of AI across Red Hat’s products, services and communities. Before that, Daniel has managed engineering groups, worked on Container Strategy and has led RHEL Product Management.

  • Blue Sky Discussion: EPEL-next or EPIC

Security: Updates, Flaws, and Purism

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Critical Linux Flaw Opens the Door to Full Root Access
  • It has been a bad week for encrypted messaging and it’s only Wednesday

    Also on Monday, a different team of researchers disclosed a vulnerability in the desktop version of the Signal messenger. It allowed attackers to send messages containing malicious HTML and JavaScript that would be executed by the app. Signal developers published a security update on Friday, a few hours after the researchers privately notified them of the vulnerability. On Monday, Signal developers issued a new patch after discovering over the weekend that the first one didn’t fully fix the bug. (The incompleteness of the patch was independently and more-or-less simultaneously found by the researchers.)

  • Purism and Nitrokey Partner to Build Purekey for Purism’s Librem Laptops

    Purism, the social purpose corporation which designs and produces security focused hardware and software, has announced today that they are partnering with Nitrokey, maker of Free Software and Open Hardware USB OpenPGP security tokens and Hardware Security Modules (HSMs) to create Purekey, Purism’s own OpenPGP security token designed to integrate with its hardware and software. Purekey embodies Purism’s mission to make security and cryptography accessible where its customers hold the keys to their own security and follows on the heels of their announcement of a partnership with cryptography pioneer and GnuPG maintainer Werner Koch.

  • Purism Expands Its Linux Hardware Portfolio To Include A USB-Based GPG SmartCard

    If Purism didn't have their hands full enough already working to further free Linux laptops and their very ambitious project to get their own Linux smartphone software/hardware shipping next year, they have now expanded their portfolio with the Purekey.

GNOME: Shell, GNOME To Do and More

Filed under
GNOME
  • Gnome Shell Dash To Panel v14 Brings Intellihide, Configurable Window Previews Size

    The Gnome Shell Dash to Panel extension combines the Dash with the top Gnome panel. The result is a single panel that provides an icon taskbar, the tray, system menu, and date / time indicator. This is similar to the KDE Plasma and Windows 7 (and newer) taskbar. The extension supports Gnome Shell 3.18 and newer.

  • Working on GNOME To Do this Summer

    I am Rohit Kaushik (kaushik on IRC) from Delhi, India. I am currently pursuing B.E Computer Science at BITS Pilani, Goa. I am interested in Software Engineering, Machine Learning and Research. I usually spend my free time playing badminton, cricket or listening to music.
    Last year, I worked on implementing Todoist for GNOME To Do and this time again I will be working on GNOME To Do, improving the two plugins that I wrote earlier and implementing newer features. I am grateful to GNOME and my mentor feaneron for giving me this opportunity.

  • Banquets and Barbecues

    One of the biggest problems with Fractal at the moment is that 1-1 messaging is pretty terrible. Since the rooms in the sidebar are sorted by most recent activity, high-traffic public rooms (such as GNOME IRC channels) tend to drown out rooms with less traffic, such as 1-1s and small groups. This is problematic because the signal-to-noise ratio in 1-1 chats and small groups tends to be much higher than in high-traffic public rooms. This leaves the user constantly searching for the rooms they care about, while the rooms they don’t care about are always at the top.

  • Performance hackfest

GNU: guix, gnucash, and glibc

Filed under
GNU
  • Tarballs, the ultimate container image format

    The tarball format is plain and simple, it’s the one we know and love, and it’s been there “forever” as its name suggests. The tarball that guix pack produces can be readily extracted on another machine, one that doesn’t run Guix, and you’re done. The problem though, is that you’ll need to either unpack the tarball in the root file system or to play tricks with the unshare command, as we saw in the previous post. Why can’t we just extract such a tarball in our home directory and directly run ./opt/gnu/bin/guile for instance?

  • Using GnuCash as a Freelancer to Track Finances and Prepare Taxes

    I don't own a credit card (by choice), so keeping a close eye on my finances is really important, but I think whether or not you have a credit card, it’s a good idea to track all of your financial transactions.
    It’s really the only way you’ll know what’s coming in and what’s going out. This is a great habit to do even if you don’t have any problems keeping a positive balance – and I would say it's essential to do if you struggle with debt.
    Luckily I have no debt but I've seen a number of people turn around their whole financial situations just by starting to keep a ledger of all of their transactions.

  • Who controls glibc?

    The removal of an old joke from the GNU C Library manual might not seem like the sort of topic that would inspire a heated debate. At times, though, a small action can serve as an inadvertent proxy for a more significant question, one which is relevant to both the developers and the users of the project. In this case, that question would be: how is the project governed and who makes decisions about which patches are applied?

    Toward the end of April, Raymond Nicholson posted a patch to the glibc manual removing a joke that he didn't think was useful to readers. The joke played on the documentation for abort() to make a statement about US government policy on providing information about abortions. As Nicholson noted: "The joke does not provide any useful information about the abort() function so removing it will not hinder use of glibc". On April 30, Zack Weinberg applied the patch to the glibc repository.

    Richard Stallman, who added the joke sometime in the 1990s, asked that it not be removed. The resulting discussion touched on a number of issues. Carlos O'Donell, who has been trying hard to resolve the issue with some degree of consensus, suggested that the joke could hurt people who have had bad experiences associated with abortion. He proposed a couple of possible alternatives, including avoiding jokes entirely or discussing such issues in a different forum. Stallman, however, replied that "a GNU manual, like a course in history, is not meant to be a 'safe space'". He suggested the possibility of adding a trigger warning about functions that create child processes, since childbirth is "far more traumatic than having an abortion".

Zenkit Is Now Available as a Snap for Ubuntu and Other GNU/Linux Distributions

Filed under
Ubuntu

Promising to offer Linux users one of the most innovative, all-in-one and web-based project management solutions, Zenkit made a Snap universal app to help Linux users install Zenkit on their favorite GNU/Linux distributions. Created by Canonical, Snaps can be installed on Ubuntu, Debian GNU/Linux, Fedora, Arch Linux, Gentoo Linux, OpenSuSE, Linux Mint, Solus, and other popular distros.

"We are delighted to see Zenkit bring their project management solution to the snap ecosystem and place the same importance on Linux users as those of other operating systems. We see an increasingly varied amount of snaps in the store, Zenkit being the latest productivity example, and therefore widening the apps available for Linux users to choose from," says Jamie Bennett, VP of Engineering, IoT and Devices at Canonical.

Read more

6 Industrial Touch-Panel Computers Based on the Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

In the smart home, voice agents are increasingly replacing the smartphone touchscreen interface as the primary human-machine interface (HMI). Yet, in noisier industrial and retail IoT environments, touchscreens are usually the only choice. The industrial touch-panel computer market has been in full swing for over a decade. Touch-panel systems based on Linux, and to a lesser extent, Android, are gaining share from those that use the still widely used Windows Embedded, and over the past year, several Raspberry Pi based systems have reached market. Here we look at six RPi-based contenders.

Read more

TDF announces LibreOffice 5.4.7

Filed under
LibO

The Document Foundation (TDF) announces LibreOffice 5.4.7, the last minor release of the LibreOffice 5.4 family, currently targeted at mainstream users and enterprises.

TDF suggests deploying LibreOffice in production environments with the backing of certified developers, migrators and trainers (an updated list is available at https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/professional-support/). This is extremely important for the growth of the LibreOffice ecosystem.

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Snyk and Black Duck Attack Free/Open Source Software for Profit Again

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OSS

Games: Tales of Maj'Eyal, Stardew Valley, Unforeseen Incidents, Albion Online, Super Hyperactive Ninja

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Gaming
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Development Leftovers

  • My talk from the RISC-V workshop in Barcelona
  • KDAB at SIGGRAPH 2018
    Yes, folks. This year SIGGRAPH 2018 is in Canada and we’ll be there at the Qt booth, showing off our latest tooling and demos. These days, you’d be surprised where Qt is used under the hood, even by the biggest players in the 3D world!
  • 9 Best Free Python Integrated Development Environments
    Python is a widely used general-purpose, high level programming language. It’s easy to read and learn. It’s frequently used for science, data analysis, and engineering. With a burgeoning scientific community and ecosystem, Python is an excellent environment for students, scientists and organizations that develop technology software. One of the essential tools for a budding Python developer is a good Integrated Development Environment (IDE). An IDE is a software application that provides comprehensive facilities to programmers for software development. Many coders learn to code using a text editor. And many professional Python developers prefer to stay with their favourite text editor, in part because a lot of text editors can be used as a development environment by making use of plugins. But many Python developers migrate to an IDE as this type of software application offers, above all else, practicality. They make coding easier, can offer significant time savings with features like autocompletion, and built-in refactoring code, and also reduces context switching. For example, IDEs have semantic knowledge of the programming language which highlights coding problems while typing. Compiling is ‘on the fly’ and debugging is integrated.
  • Want to Debug Latency?
    In the recent decade, our systems got complex. Our average production environments consist of many different services (many microservices, storage systems and more) with different deployment and production-maintenance cycles. In most cases, each service is built and maintained by a different team — sometimes by a different company. Teams don’t have much insight into others’ services. The final glue that puts everything together is often a staging environment or sometimes the production itself! Measuring latency and being able to react to latency issues are getting equally complex as our systems got more complex. This article will help you how to navigate yourself at a latency problem and what you need to put in place to effectively do so.

Devices: AsteroidOS, Das blinkenlight, Android P

  • The open source AsteroidOS is a new alternative to Wear OS
    AsteroidOS is a new Linux-based open source operating system that can be used as a replacement to Wear OS. A small team of developers have been hard at work on the smartwatch platform for the last four years. As the culmination of their efforts, this week the first stable version was made available to the public. It plays nice with a few Wear OS-compatible smartwatches.
  • Das blinkenlights are back thanks to RPi revival of the PDP-11
    The designers left the I2C port of the Raspberry Pi free for hacks, and “it is not very hard to add support for such things in the simh emulator, so the PiDP-11 can use them as I/O”. The SR switches on the PiDP-11's SR switches can be set to boot various operating systems (this part is a work in progress), so instead of RSX-11MPlus users can choose BSD, DOS-11, Unix System 6 or System 7 and the like.
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  • How Android P Will Increase Battery Life

today's howtos

GNU nano 2.9.7 was released

Accumulated changes over the last five releases include: the ability to bind a key to a string (text and/or escape sequences), a default color of bright white on red for error messages, an improvement to the way the Scroll-Up and Scroll-Down commands work, and the new --afterends option to make Ctrl+Right (next word) stop at the end of a word instead of at the beginning. Check it out. Read more