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Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 Benchmarks On AMD EPYC - Big Speed-Ups Over RHEL7

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Red Hat

Since the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 at the start of May we've been running various benchmarks of this latest enterprise Linux platform. Our tests to date have been with Intel Xeon hardware where it's been performing well and a nice speed-up over RHEL 7 with modern Xeon Scalable CPUs. Similarly, AMD EPYC is also much faster with RHEL 8.0 thanks to the much newer Linux kernel, compiler, and other software updates.

AMD EPYC screams on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0 compared to RHEL 7.6. The modern AMD server platform performs much better thanks to the GCC 8.2 compiler replacing the older GCC 4.8 compiler that came well before any Zen support. The Linux 4.18 kernel is also a blessing for newer AMD (and Intel/IBM/ARM) hardware compared to the heavily-patched Linux 3.10 kernel of RHEL7. RHEL 8.0 also shifted over to the MQ-Deadline scheduler for SATA SSDs compared to the non-MQ deadline scheduler and the plethora of upgraded packages compared to RHEL7 also means a big deal for performance at large.

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Microsoft Swallowing Everything and DRM (or 'Cloud') Makes Users 'Slaves'

Filed under
Microsoft
  • One billion Linux desktops? [Ed: Pushing the nonsense that Linux counts only when it's spied on]
  • Neil Williams: New directions

    Third, my job hunting has shown that the centralisation of decentralised version control is still a thing. As far as recruitment is concerned, if the code isn't visible on GitHub, it doesn't exist. (It's not the recruitment agencies asking for GitHub links, it is the company HR departments themselves.) So I had to add a bunch of projects to GitHub and there's a link now in the blog.

  • We Are Tenants on Our Own Devices

    Today, we may think we own things because we paid for them and brought them home, but as long as they run software or have digital connectivity, the sellers continue to have control over the product. We are renters of our own objects, there by the grace of the true owner.

  • DRM and terms-of-service have ended true ownership, turning us into "tenants of our own devices"

    Tufekci's analysis points out a serious problem in the "Surveillance Capitalism" critique that says that paying for devices and services (rather than getting them through an advertising subsidy) would restore dignity and balance to the tech world. When Apple charges you $1,000 for a phone and then spends millions killing Right to Repair legislation so that you'll be forced to buy repair services from Apple, who will therefore be able to decide when it's time to stop fixing your phone and for you to buy a new one, then it's clear that "if you're not paying for the product" is a serious misstatement, because in a world of Big Tech monopolies, even when you're paying for the product, you're still the product.

Graphics: RISC-V, WebRender, SVT-AV1/Intel, AMD and X.Org

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • SiFive RISC-V SoCs Can Now Be Paired With A GPU... Imagination's PowerVR

    If you want a SiFive SoC for the royalty-free, open-source RISC-V architecture it's now possible to pair it with graphics. Unfortunately, the graphics option is about as far from open-source as possible.

  • WebRender newsletter #45

    WebRender is a GPU based 2D rendering engine for web written in Rust, currently powering Mozilla’s research web browser servo and on its way to becoming Firefox‘s rendering engine.

  • Mozilla GFX: Graphics Team ships WebRender MVP!

    After many months of hard work and preparation, I’m pleased to announce the general availability of WebRender for selected Windows 10 devices. WebRender is a major rewrite of the Firefox rendering architecture using the same kind of GPU-based acceleration techniques used by games.

  • SVT-AV1 0.5 Released As Intel's Speedy AV1 Video Encoder

    While we have been reporting on and benchmarking the Intel SVT video encoders since February, they were only officially announced last month and this Sunday marks their first tagged release for the AV1 encoder in the form of SVT-AV1 0.5.0.

    SVT-AV1 0.5 is easily one of the fastest AV1 CPU-based video encoders and has been performing excellent in our tests, including continued daily benchmarks of it in keeping track of its performance.

  • Intel Graphics Compiler 1.0.4 Released With Fixes & Improvements

    Less than one month after releasing the Intel Graphics Compiler 1.0.3, the Intel team maintaining "IGC" today released version 1.0.4.

    The only changes to this LLVM-based graphics compiler for Intel GEN graphics hardware are "minor fixes and improvements."

  • RadeonSI Primitive Culling Lands In Mesa 19.2

    The past few months AMD's Marek Olšák has been working on primitive culling support for the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver and last week that code was merged into the Mesa 19.2 development code.

    Marek has been working on primitive culling via asynchronous compute prior to the vertex shader process to eliminate geometry that ends up being invisible. Marek found that this functionality helps in workloads like the workstation ParaView software we use as part of our OpenGL test suite.

  • X.Org's XDC2019 Issues Call For Proposals On Wayland, Mesa, X.Org, Etc

    X.Org's annual event, the X.Org Developers' Conference, is running like a well-oiled machined these days. While there are still months to go until XDC2019 in Montreal, a Call for Proposals has been issued for those wishing to speak at this annual gathering that pertains to Wayland, Mesa, libinput, Cairo, and related components as well, yes, the X.Org Server.

Programming: Qt Design Studio, GCC, Digest, Learning C++, Eclipse and More

Filed under
Development
  • Qt Design Studio 1.2 Beta Offers Bridge With Sketch Vector Graphics Editor

    Qt Design Studio 1.2 Beta also introduces gradients support for shape-based items and other changes. More details on the Qt Design Studio 1.2 Beta over on the Qt blog.

  • Qt Design Studio 1.2 Beta released

    Qt Design Studio is a UI design and development tool that enables designers and developers to rapidly prototype and develop complex UIs. Both designers and developers use Qt Design Studio and this makes collaboration between the two a lot simpler and more streamlined. To get an impression, you should watch this video.

    The main addition for Qt Design Studio 1.2 is the Sketch Bridge. It is now possible to export your scenes from Sketch and import them to Qt Design Studio 1.2.

  • ESR Switches To Threadripper But His GCC SVN-To-Git Conversion Could Still Take Months

    It looks like the saga of converting the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) source tree from SVN to Git isn't over yet and could still take months until completion. 

    As written about last week, a Linaro developer worked on a Bash script leveraging Git-SVN for converting GCC's SVN to Git as while Eric S Raymond has been working on the effort for many months using his homegrown "Reposurgeon" utility, it hasn't yet panned out. Reposurgeon in last year's form was too memory hungry and slow while ultimately he began rewriting the tool in Golang in hopes of addressing these issues.

  • digest 0.6.19

    digest creates hash digests of arbitrary R objects (using the md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-512, crc32, xxhash32, xxhash64, murmur32, and spookyhash algorithms) permitting easy comparison of R language objects.

    This version contains two new functions adding new digest functionality. First, Dmitriy Selivanov added a fast and vectorized digest2int to convert (arbitrary) strings into 32 bit integers using one-at-a-time hashing. Second, Kendon Bell, over a series of PRs, put together a nice implementation of spookyhash as a first streaming hash algorithm in digest. So big thanks to both Dmitriy and Kendon.

  • Next C++ workshop: Binary Search Trees, 23 May at 18:00 UTC

    Learn C++ features with the help of LibreOffice developers! We’re running regular workshops which focus on a specific topic, and are accompanied by a real-time IRC meeting. 

  • Apache Camel development on Eclipse Che 7

    Apache Camel development is improving on Eclipse Che 7 compared to Che 6. On Che 6, it is limited to XML DSL and without classical XSD-based XML support. With Che 7, Camel Java DSL is available and XSD-based XML support is working nicely with the Camel XML DSL support. Please note that Che 7 is still in beta.

  • level up yo py/js adhd af research blaggin
  • Episode 4: A Conversation with Steve George

    Steve joined Weaveworks in February 2017 as COO. In a career spanning 20 years, Steve has worked in a range of roles in the technology sector, most recently leading Canonical’s operations and corporate development. His interest and support for FOSS goes back to 1997, when he got hold of his first copy of Slackware on floppy disk.

  • Rule-Based Matching In Natural Language Processing

    SpaCy is an open-source software library for advanced Natural Language Processing, written in Python and Cython. Here it is used to build a rule-based matcher that always classifies the word "iPhone" as a product entity

  • Eclipse IoT Surveys Developer Community
  • MIME type "text/vnd.sosi" for SOSI map data

    As part of my involvement in the work to standardise a REST based API for Noark 5, the Norwegian archiving standard, I spent some time the last few months to try to register a MIME type and PRONOM code for the SOSI file format. The background is that there is a set of formats approved for long term storage and archiving in Norway, and among these formats, SOSI is the only format missing a MIME type and PRONOM code.

Kerala Infrastructure and Technology for Education to make physics experiments easier

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Higher secondary students will now be able to undertake physics experiments in digital form, courtesy the Kerala Infrastructure and Technology for Education (KITE).

KITE will make available a free and open source software (FOSS) and hardware ‘ExpEYES’ (Experiments for Young Engineers and Scientists) that can be connected to laptops. This facility for physics studies is in addition to the Maths IT labs that will be introduced this year.

At present, 36 practical activities have been stipulated for higher secondary students.

In addition to lab experiments, students can easily undertake electronics, electrical, mechanical, thermal, and sound experiments through ExpEYES, a recent statement from KITE said.

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The Huawei Ban: Will Linux Replace Windows On Future Huawei Laptops?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

As I write this, Bloomberg has learned that other U.S-based tech giants like Intel, Qualcomm and Broadcom will cut off their supply of components to Huawei. Losing access to Intel processors will obviously affect future Huawei laptops, but what about the operating system Huawei will ship on these devices? What about the installation of Windows 10 you currently have on your Huawei laptop?

[...]

Linux Out Of The Box?

We know that Huawei has prepared for this situation by developing its own in-house alternative operating systems to both Android and Windows, though the state of said development is unknown.

Its Windows alternative is almost certainly a custom Linux distribution. And it's not far-fetched to speculate that Huawei has it playing nicely on its own processors.

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Lokomotive: Production-ready Kubernetes distribution with Linux technologies

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Kinvolk.io, a software consultancy specializing in cloud tech for Linux, announced their Kubernetes distribution Lokomotive on May 17, 2019. Under an open source license, Lokomotiv aims towards production-ready performance and a secure, stable Kubernetes distribution.

According to Kinvolk, the fully supported release and commercial support with lokoctl and Lokomotive Components pulls into the station sometime this summer. For now, let us have a look at what’s under the hood and the project’s goals.

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Also: Kubernetes, Cloud Native, and the Future of Software

10 Best Linux Distros to Install on a USB Stick

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The GNU/Linux community is blessed with 100+ distributions and we do our best to cover only the best of them on FossMint so if you haven’t checked out titles like the Best Linux Distros for Laptops in 2019, 5 Operating Systems for the IoT, and the Top 10 GNU/Linux Distros for Privacy & Security then you probably should.

Today, our attention is Linux distros that are perfect for running from USB sticks (and potentially other portable external storage devices) which means that we’ll be concentrating on portable Operating Systems.

These are Operating Systems that are designed to be minimalist in their resource requirements i.e. they can run on hardware with little secondary storage space and/or little RAM.

Portable Operating Systems also typically come in small enough sizes to fit on USB drives and CDs without losing the quality of their performance even when running on old machines. With that being said, here’s my list of the best portable Linux distributions.

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Audiocasts/Shows: Coder Radio, SMLR and This Week in Linux

Filed under
Interviews
  • Batteries are Leaking | Coder Radio 358

    A strong argument against Python’s batteries included model exposes some bigger problems the community is struggling with. We chat about all of it.

    Plus lessons learned six years after a project, a new tool, and some feedback.

  • SMLR 307 Night of The Living Daemon
  • This Week in Linux 67 | Zombieload, Nextcloud, Peppermint 10, KDE Plasma, IPFire, ArcoLinux, LuneOS

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ll check out some Distro News from Peppermint OS, ArcoLinux, LuneOS & IPFire. We got a couple apps to talking about like Nextclou0…d and a new Wallpaper tool that has quite a bit of potential. We’ll take a look at what is to come with the next version of KDE Plasma. Intel users have gotten some more bad news regarding a new security vulnerability. Later in the show, we’ll cover some interesting information regarding a couple governments saving money by switching to Linux. Then finally we’ll check out some Linux Gaming News. All that and much more on your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

Kernel: Btrfs vs Ext4, Xen, Management Engine and Purism (Which Disabled It)

Filed under
Linux
  • Some Btrfs vs Ext4 random-read/write performance observations

    I’ve been using XFS as a very conservative file system choice for the last four years or so after being burned by BtrFS file system corruptions a couple of times in a row. However, I’ve been working more with many small files lately to build this blog using a static website generator. Performance hasn’t been great and I’ve also found a need for recording file creation times, something which isn’t natively supported by XFS.

    My hardware setup have consisted of two old fashioned spinning software mirrored 4 terabyte hard drives for my home directory. I’ve used these drives as a backing drive with a Samsung 960 EVO NVMe solid state drive as a LVM cache drive for performance. I stopped using LVM cache disk a few months ago as I wanted to enable full-drive encryption and it also prevented my system from hibernating; a problem LVM caches share with BCache. I considered trying BCache anyway, but luckily decided against it just days before people started noticing drive corruptions with BCache on GCC 9 and Linux 5.

    After a careful review I decided to slim down my home directory and move over to the NVMe with an LUKS encrypted BtrFS file system. I’ve had bad experiences with this file system in the past, but surely something has happened in the last four years, right? I decided to give it a fourth chance in the interest of getting a more modern file system. I had to move a lot of files over to a separate drive, but cleaning up your home directory never hurt anyone (assuming you have proper backups).

  • Xen Developers Continue Work On CPU Core Scheduling Support

    Sent out earlier this month is the second version of the Xen core scheduling patches that allow for CPU core and socket-level scheduling by this virtualization hypervisor.

    The focus of this core/socket-level scheduling is to ensure the same VM(s) share the vCPU threads, which is more important these days in light of the various CPU speculative execution vulnerabilities that make Hyper Threading look particularly unsafe.

  • Do you know what IVBP, ROMB or UTOK are?

    First, thanks to everyone for the all the help with UEFI modules. There are a ton left, but also a lot done, so we’re getting there. If anyone is intimately familiar with ME firmware, I’d also really like some help with this Intel Management Engine document too. Thanks!

  • Purism and the Linux Kernel

    We’re especially proud of our kernel contributions – where 13 patches have made it into 5.1. Since this is our first installment, it also includes the changes that went into 5.0 and 4.20. Bellow is a list of our most recent contributions.

Games: Pixel Noir, Hell is Other Demons, Sipho, Regions Of Ruin, Afterlight and Tank Maniacs

Filed under
Gaming
  • Pixel Noir, a turn-based RPG set against a film noir backdrop is entering Early Access soon

    Here's another game successfully funded on Kickstarter, one we missed, which looks fantastic and it's coming to Linux. It's called Pixel Noir and it sure does look stylish.

    It was funded on Kickstarter back in 2015 with the help of nearly two thousand backers. Interestingly, the reason we didn't pick it up is that the campaign wasn't originally targetting Linux as a platform.

  • Hell is Other Demons is a frantic arcade shooter that's pure bliss to play, out now

    Not originally scheduled to release same-day with Linux support, Hell is Other Demons, developed by Cuddle Monster Games and publishing from Kongregate is out now and it's damn good.

    Hell is Other Demons is a ridiculously good retro-looking arcade shooter, one that I've pretty much fallen in love with. From the moment I got to test it, I was hooked right in thanks to the incredible styling. That's not all though, while the game is mechanically simple as it's basically a platform shooter with tiny arenas it's in no way easy. It manages to do a lot with the simplicity, while also giving you a lot of choice.

  • Creature-building survival-action game 'Sipho' has a new breed in the latest update

    The whole idea of the game is pretty sweet, giving a different kind of action and survival experience. It has a nice gameplay loop to it already with you picking a breed, constructing your creature and then attempting to survive while also possibly unlocking a new breed if you collect enough of their DNA. Once you manage to take down the Queen, you also get to play with the Aquarium feature, which is basically a sandbox area to do whatever you want.

  • Regions Of Ruin, a side-scrolling RPG with town-building is now on GOG

    Regions Of Ruin from Vox Games and Poysky Productions, a side-scrolling RPG with town-building is now available DRM-free on GOG. A nice reminder of it too, one we completely missed actually being properly released for Linux.

  • In the 2.5D puzzle-adventure Afterlight, you play as an isolated astronaut on Titan

    Afterlight really does look beautiful, with a "2.5D" style this puzzle-adventure is one to firmly keep an eye on.

    It's currently looking for funding on Kickstarter, with Linux as a planned platform for release "Our main platform is PC (Windows, Mac & Linux) via Steam" and their FAQ also makes it clear Linux is a target too. With 24 days to go, they're closing in on half of the $35K goal.

  • Tank Maniacs looks like some seriously good local multiplayer fun, coming to Linux soon

    Tank Maniacs, a local multiplayer party game about blowing up everyone with tanks looks really fun and it's coming to Linux. I managed to get confirmation from the developer on Twitter, who mentioned a Linux build is now up for those testing it.

    A game that doesn't exactly need a long description, you each pilot a strange tank and attempt to destroy everyone else. As the developer says "It's mostly about destroying your closest friends' hopes and dreams with weird tanks."—hah.

Events Roundup: Fedora, LSS, Kubecon, Linux Plumbers Conference, YottaDB at LFNW

Filed under
OSS
  • Fedora Mexico: Three months of activities

    The Fedora contributors and enthusiast in Mexico city has monthly meetings since February.

  • Linux Security Summit 2019 North America: CFP / OSS Early Bird Registration

    The LSS North America 2019 CFP is currently open, and you have until May 31st to submit your proposal. (That’s the end of next week!)

    If you’re planning on attending LSS NA in San Diego, note that the Early Bird registration for Open Source Summit (which we’re co-located with) ends today.

  • Kubeflow at KubeCon Europe 2019 in Barcelona

    Kubeflow, the Kubernetes native application for AI and Machine Learning, continues to accelerate feature additions and community growth. The community has released two new versions since the last Kubecon – 0.4 in January and 0.5 in April – and is currently working on the 0.6 release, to be released in July. The key features in each release are briefly discussed below.

  • Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Tracing Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! Its return to Linux Plumbers shows that tracing is not finished in Linux, and there continue to be challenging problems to solve.

    There’s a broad list of ways to perform Tracing in Linux. From the original mainline Linux tracer, Ftrace, to profiling tools like perf, more complex customized tracing like BPF and out-of-tree tracers like LTTng, systemtap, and Dtrace. Part of the trouble with tracing within Linux is that there is so much to choose from. Each of these have their own audience, but there is a lot of overlap. This year’s theme is to find those common areas and combine them into common utilities.

  • YottaDB

    At the core of YottaDB is a daemon-less hierarchical key-value database engine that executes within the address space of the application process, which makes in-memory calls to a YottaDB API. Processes cooperate with one another to manage the database, and the achievable throughput is limited by the underlying computing platform, rather than the potential single-point bottleneck of a daemon. Combining the database engine and application logic in a single process yields robustness, security, simplicity and performance.

  • YottaDB at LFNW 2019

    YottaDB was happy to sponsor and attend the 2019 Linux Fest North West in Bellingham, WA on April 26 -28, 2019.

Red Hat Family: Fedora, CloudLinux, CentOS and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora Community Blog: GSOC 2019 – release-bot project

    On May 6, the selected students for Google summer of code 2019 were officially announced. We, as mentors of the release-bot project, would like to thank all applicants and provide insight into our decision process.

    Google summer of code is popular for the past several years which means that competition is really high. For our project, release-bot, this was definitely the case. We had several very promising candidates providing early contributions.

  • CloudLinux OS Feature Survey - CLOSING SOON

    We're closing this CloudLinux OS feature survey at the end of this month. We'll publish the results after the survey has closed.

    Thanks to everyone who participated. If you didn't, there's still time to share your views on the direction of CloudLinux OS. It only takes a few minutes.

  • May 30 virtual event explores digital leadership in financial services

    Today’s financial services businesses are faced with the need to drive new and better digital products, services, and efficiencies to improve customer loyalty and competitive advantage. Payments, authorizations, and risk and fraud assessments are embedded as part of everyday events rather than an event unto itself, with the need for speed—now often in fractions of a second—blurring the lines between front office and back office operational processing. Financial services companies need to balance the costs of renewing systems with the costs of adopting new, innovative technologies, while seeking advantages from automation, real time assessments, embedded intelligence, and more.

  • CentOS 8 Release Map And It’s Details

    We already know that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 was released on 2019-05-07, and everyone is waiting for CentOS 8 release.

    Most of us doesn’t have active subscription to download Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 from the Red Hat Customer Portal.

    We have to wait till CentOS 8 release to test this out.

  • OpenShift 4: Red Hat's on ramp for the hybrid cloud

    In this next generation of Red Hat's Kubernetes platform, Red Hat explicitly stated OpenShift 4 is designed to deliver a cloud-like experience across the hybrid cloud by driving automated updates across Kubernetes deployments everywhere. Or, as Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst summed it up: "Make open hybrid cloud the default architecture."

    In more detail, Ashesh Badani, Red Hat senior vice president of Cloud Platforms, said: "Enterprise IT's future is driven by hybrid and multicloud computing, with Kubernetes acting as a bridge to seamlessly connect workloads between on-premise datacenters and public cloud footprints. Red Hat OpenShift 4 makes this vision of Kubernetes a reality, offering a consistent, self-managing enterprise Kubernetes platform that spans the hybrid cloud."

  • Sudo + syslog-ng: two software at two conferences

    Recently I visited two conferences: LOADays and Red Hat Summit. They both focus on open source software, but similarities end there. LOADays in Antwerp is small, free and focuses on Linux administrators. The Red Hat Summit in Boston is huge, expensive and covers a wide variety of topics, including administration among many others. No matter of the differences, both are among my favorite events.

    Why sudo? Last year Balabit, the company where I work, was acquired by One Identity. Todd Miller, developer of sudo became my colleague. I was happy to see another open source software around. I read sudo and learned that it has many more features than I knew about, even if I have been using it for decades. So, next to syslog-ng I started to evangelize sudo as well, demonstrating how much more it can be than a simple prefix to administrative commands.

  • Software Defined Storage: The Next Killer App for Cloud

    It’s never going to be possible to completely disconnect software from hardware. Indeed, hardware development is having a bit of a rebirth as young developers rediscover things like the 6502, homebrew computing, and 8-bit assembly languages. If this keeps going, in 20 years developers will reminisce fondly and build hobby projects in early IoT platforms, using 2007-era cloud APIs with old refrigerator-sized storage arrays.

    In my experience, storage hardware has remained something of a legacy boat anchor in many enterprises: you don’t mess around when it comes to storing your company’s long term data or selecting storage providers for your lights-on, business critical applications. Governments demand it be retained, and data scientists are increasingly building new algorithms based on giant old datasets. For a time after the cloud revolution began in the late 2000’s it seemed that storage hardware wouldn’t be moving to x86 cloud-based virtual machines–much less Linux containers–anytime soon.

DragonFlyBSD 5.4.3 Released With Various Fixes

Filed under
BSD

DragonFlyBSD 5.4.3 was released on Monday with just a hand full of changes over last month's 5.4.2 point release.

DragonFlyBSD 5.4.3 takes care of an SMP race condition within the PF code, fixes a FP bug in its kernel, restores the trim_enabled device sysctl, ensures the ca_root_nss certificate is installed, sets GID_TTY for non-root users by default, and stubs out pthread_equal() for its C library.

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Comparing Search between Nautilus and Nemo File Managers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME

Personally, I like Nemo search better than Nautilus search as I need to sort everything I find and I cannot do that with Nautilus. I love sort by Date/Descending as I use it everyday.

Apparently, not only me saying this. I don't know why this once-existed feature removed in current versions of Nautilus, as normal interface provides sorting but search interface does not. I will not wonder if somebody ask "why not removing sort in the normal interface as well?" or such.

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Set up a static network connection in Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Configuring a network connection from a Linux machine can be challenging. Fortunately, many new Linux distributions come with some type of network management tool that can help you automatically connect to a wireless network. But wouldn't it be nice to be able to set up a static network connection from a Linux machine? This guide will show you how to use different Linux tools to check for network connections from a CentOS/RHEL machine and explain how to add a static network using the nmcli tool.

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Linux distros without systemd

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you are reading this post you're very much likely not a fan of systemd already. So we won't preach on why systemd is bad, but today we'll focus more on what are the alternatives out there. Our approach is obviously not for settling for less but for changing things for the better. We have started the world after systemd project some time ago and the search isn't over.

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Discussion: Linux Distros Without Systemd (2019)

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • NetBSD 8.1 RC1 Released With MDS Mitigations, Option To Turn Off SMT/HT, Driver Updates

    The first and only anticipated release candidate for NetBSD 8.1 is now available for testing.

    The NetBSD 8.1 release candidate adds the necessary mitigations for the Microarchitectural Data Sampling / Zombieload vulnerabilities. With Hyper Threading looking increasingly insecure with these new CPU vulnerabilities, NetBSD has joined other operating systems in offering a new setting to disable HT/SMT support: the smtoff rc.conf option.

  • Outbound Traffic Filtering | Roadmap to Securing Your Infrastructure

    This week, we’re discussing outbound traffic filtering. This is filtering provided at the network edge by a firewall with rules (ACLs) restricting what internal users are allowed to access. Some firewalls have the ability to filter by an application (layer 7 firewalls), but we’re going to concentrate on standard packet-filtering firewalls and their capabilities. There are several reasons for wanting to restrict outbound communications, such as defeating malware, making data exfiltration harder, and the detection of infected hosts.

  • Bluetooth's Complexity Has Become a Security Risk

    Fundamentally, both Bluetooth and BLE open up a channel for two devices to communicate—an extremely useful arrangement, but one that also opens the door for dangerous interactions. Without strong cryptographic authentication checks, malicious third parties can use Bluetooth and BLE to connect to a device they shouldn't have access to, or trick targets into thinking their rogue device is a trusted one.

  • Huawei promises continued security updates and service to existing users post Google ban

    Google has shocked the world by banning Huawei from future OS versions and security updates, but existing Huawei handsets will continue getting Google Play app updates, while Huawei promises it will issue security updates instead.

  • Security Advisory: Kernel and Firmware Updates for Intel MDS Vulnerability
  • ICE Tops Its Old Record, Spends Another $820,000 On Cellphone-Cracking Tools

    As consecutive heads of the FBI have whined about the general public's increasing ability to keep their devices and personal data secure with encryption, a number of companies have offered tools that make this a moot point. Grayshift -- the manufacturer of phone-cracking tool GrayKey -- has been selling hundreds of thousands of dollars-worth of devices to other federal agencies not so insistent the only solution is backdoored encryption.

    ICE is one of these agencies. It led all federal agencies in phone-cracking expenditures in 2018. It spent $384,000 on these tools last year. It wasn't just ICE. Other agencies like the DEA and [checks notes] the Food and Drug Administration have also purchased these devices. But ICE led the pack, most likely because ICE -- along with DHS counterpart CBP -- are engaging in more suspicionless, warrantless device searches than ever.

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More in Tux Machines

Programming: GCC, C++, Python and PHP

  • AMD GCN GPU Target Continuing To Improve For The GCC 10 Compiler
    With the recent release of the GCC 9 stable compiler there is the initial "AMD GCN" GPU target/back-end merged. However, for this GNU Compiler Collection release the AMD GCN target isn't all that useful but continued work on it gives us hope of seeing it in good shape for next year's GCC 10 release. With the GCC 9.1 release, the AMD GCN back-end can only handle running basic single-threaded programs... Not exactly useful for graphics cards. The GCC 9 code supports targeting the Fiji and Vega 10 GCN instruction set architecture.
  • IBM Begins Plumbing "Future" Processor Into GCC Compiler - POWER10?
    IBM engineers have landed initial support for "-mcpu=future" into the GCC compiler... As they say in the commit message, "a future architecture level, as yet unnamed." This IBM "future" processor is being added to the POWER architecture code succeeding POWER9. More than likely, its the early enablement work for POWER10.
  • Little Trouble in Big Data – Part 1
    A few months ago, we received a phone call from a bioinformatics group at a European university. The problem they were having appeared very simple. They wanted to know how to usemmap() to be able to load a large data set into RAM at once. OK I thought, no problem, I can handle that one. Turns out this has grown into a complex and interesting exercise in profiling and threading. The background is that they are performing Markov-Chain Monte Carlo simulations by sampling at random from data sets containing SNP (pronounced “snips”) genetic markers for a selection of people. It boils down to a large 2D matrix of floats where each column corresponds to an SNP and each row to a person. They provided some small and medium sized data sets for me to test with, but their full data set consists of 500,000 people with 38 million SNP genetic markers!
  • Why precompiled headers do (not) improve C++ compile times
    Would you like your C++ code to compile twice as fast (or more)? Yeah, so would I. Who wouldn't. C++ is notorious for taking its sweet time to get compiled. I never really cared about PCHs when I worked on KDE, I think I might have tried them once for something and it didn't seem to do a thing. In 2012, while working on LibreOffice, I noticed its build system used to have PCH support, but it had been nuked, with the usual poor OOo/LO style of a commit message stating the obvious (what) without bothering to state the useful (why). For whatever reason, that caught my attention, reportedly PCHs saved a lot of build time with MSVC, so I tried it and it did. And me having brought the PCH support back from the graveyard means that e.g. the Calc module does not take 5:30m to build on a (very) powerful machine, but only 1:45m. That's only one third of the time. In line with my previous experience, on Linux that did nothing. I made the build system support also PCH with GCC and Clang, because it was there and it was simple to support it too, but there was no point. I don't think anybody has ever used that for real. Then, about a year ago, I happened to be working on a relatively small C++ project that used some kind of an obscure build system called Premake I had never heard of before. While fixing something in it I noticed it also had PCH support, so guess what, I of course enabled it for the project. It again made the project build faster on Windows. And, on Linux, it did too. Color me surprised.
  • KDAB at CppCon 2019
    CppCon is the annual, week-long face-to-face gathering for the entire C++ community – the biggest C++ event in the world. This year, for the first time, CppCon takes place in the stunning Gaylord Rockies Hotel and Convention Center in Aurora, Colorado, very near Denver International Airport.
  • Clear Linux Discovers Another AVX2/AVX512 Fix/Optimization To Yield Better Performance
    For those running a system with AVX-512 support, Clear Linux builds as of this week should be yielding even better performance on top of their existing AVX2 and AVX-512 optimizations. The Intel developers working on Clear Linux uncovered an issue how the new GCC 9 compiler has been building the important libm math library poorly in AVX2/AVX-512 mode. This poor code compilation yielded slowdowns in various math functions since the switch to the GCC 9 compiler.
  • Building Machine Learning Data Pipeline using Apache Spark
  • It is easier to gather package meta-data from PyPI package ecosystem, once know the right way
  • Python 2.7 vs Python 3.4 ─ What should Python Beginners choose?
  • Be Quick or Eat Potatoes: A Newbie’s Guide to PyCon
  • Remote Development with Wing Pro
    In this issue of Wing Tips we take a quick look at Wing Pro's remote development capabilities.
  • Data School: Data science best practices with pandas (video tutorial)
  • PHP extensions status with upcoming PHP 7.4

PostgreSQL 12 Beta 1 Released!

The PostgreSQL Global Development Group announces that the first beta release of PostgreSQL 12 is now available for download. This release contains previews of all features that will be available in the final release of PostgreSQL 12, though some details of the release could change before then. In the spirit of the open source PostgreSQL community, we strongly encourage you to test the new features of PostgreSQL 12 in your database systems to help us eliminate any bugs or other issues that may exist. While we do not advise you to run PostgreSQL 12 Beta 1 in your production environments, we encourage you to find ways to run your typical application workloads against this beta release. Read more Also: PostgreSQL 12 Beta Released With Performance Improvements

ZFS On Linux 0.8 Released With Native Encryption, TRIM, Device Removal

The feature-packed and long-desired ZFS On Linux 0.8 release has finally taken place! ZoL 0.8 is out there! ZFS On Linux 0.8 has debuted today as the newest feature release for this ZFS file-system port for Linux systems. ZFS On Linux 0.8 supports up through the latest Linux 5.1 stable series while still working going back to the Linux 2.6.32 kernel days, but the SIMD support isn't available on stock 5.0+ kernels leading to big performance penalties. Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers: Blobs, Snapcraft and Arronax

  • Ubuntu 19.10 To Bundle NVIDIA's Proprietary Driver Packages As Part Of Its ISO
    For Ubuntu 19.10 the developers are adding the NVIDIA driver packages onto the ISO. The NVIDIA binary drivers won't be activated by default, but will be present on the install media to make it easier to enable post-install. The open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" drivers will remain the default for NVIDIA graphics on new Ubuntu installations, but this change is positioning the mainline and legacy NVIDIA proprietary drivers onto the Ubuntu ISO so that they can be easily obtained locally post-install. The main driver here is allowing users to enable the NVIDIA proprietary graphics on Ubuntu even if you don't have an Internet connection. NVIDIA has already okay'ed the distribution of their driver packages with the Ubuntu ISO.
  • Snapcraft parts & plugins
    Last week, we published Introduction to snapcraft, a tutorial that provided a detailed overview of the snap build process. We touched on the concepts like snap ecosystem components, snapcraft command line, snapcraft.yaml syntax, and more. We’d like to expand on the first lesson, and today, we are going to talk about parts and plugins, used in the build process of snaps.
  • Arronax – Graphical Tool to Create Desktop Launcher in Ubuntu
    For those who want to manually create desktop shortcut launcher in Ubuntu 16.04, Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 19.04, Arronax is a good choice with graphical user interface. Other than creating .desktop file via Linux command, Arronax offers a graphical interface to create (and also edit) desktop shortcut for application, executable file, or URL.