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Friday, 19 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Microsoft Lies and Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Why MX Linux Is the Windows Alternative You’ve Been Waiting For

Filed under
GNU
Linux

If you’re looking for a Windows alternative but have shied away from Linux, MX Linux may be the solution you’ve been waiting for.

Linux distributions have always held promise for Windows users to migrate away from an expensive OS. Even Windows 10 has enough quirks and issues that a truly robust and functional Linux alternative could easily entice longtime Windows users to switch.

Let’s take a closer look at MX Linux from the perspective of a longtime Windows user.

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Chromebox and Chrome 'Hacks'

Filed under
Google
  • CTL’s New CBX1 Chromebox is a Powerhouse at a Great Price

    Chromeboxes are really great desktops for users who have moved their workflow into a web browser, especially at lower prices. You don’t need higher specs inside a Chromebox for it to work well, but it can help.

    For those who want a supercharged Chromebox on the cheap, Oregon-based CTL has just the thing for you. Its new Chromebox—the CBX1—has all the high-end parts you could want, at a comparatively low price.

  • How to Install Progressive Web Apps (PWAs) in Chrome

    Chrome 70, available now, lets you install “Progressive Web Apps,” or PWAs, on Windows. When you visit a website with a PWA, like Twitter or Spotify, you can now “install” it to make it behave more like a normal desktop application.

  • How to Stop Chrome From Automatically Signing You Into the Browser

    With Chrome 69, Google began automatically signing you into the Chrome browser whenever you signed into a Google website like Gmail. Chrome 70, available now, has a hidden option to disable this feature.

    We don’t think most Chrome users will care about this. But, if you do care, Google now gives you a choice. And that’s good news.

MongoDB Becomes Less Affero GPL-Like

Filed under
Server
OSS
Legal
  • Fed up with cloud giants ripping off its database, MongoDB forks new open-source license

    After Redis Labs relicensed the modules it developed to complement its open-source database, from AGPL to Apache v2.0 with a Commons Clause, the free-software community expressed dismay.

    And, inevitably, some responded by forking the affected code.

    Today, the maker of another open source database, MongoDB, plans to introduce a license of its own to deal with the issue cited by Redis: cloud service providers that sell hosted versions of open-source programs – such as Redis and MongoDB database servers – without offering anything in return.

    "Once an open source project becomes interesting or popular, it becomes too easy for the cloud vendors to capture all the value and give nothing back to the community," said Dev Ittycheria, CEO of MongoDB, in a phone interview with The Register.

    Ittycheria pointed to cloud service providers such as Alibaba, Tencent, and Yandex. Those companies, he claims, are testing the boundaries of the AGPL by benefiting from the work of others while failing to share their code.

  • MongoDB switches up its open-source license

    MongoDB is a bit miffed that some cloud providers — especially in Asia — are taking its open-source code and offering a hosted commercial version of its database to their users without playing by the open-source rules. To combat this, MongoDB today announced it has issued a new software license, the Server Side Public License (SSPL), that will apply to all new releases of its MongoDB Community Server, as well as all patch fixes for prior versions.

    Previously, MongoDB used the GNU AGPLv3 license, but it has now submitted the SSPL for approval from the Open Source Initiative.

  • MongoDB license could push open source deeper into cloud: Is this what industry needs?

    Things just got serious in open source land. Despite the occasional Commons Clause or Fair Source licensing attempt to change the meaning of the words "open source" to include "the right for a private company to make money from its open source efforts," we've stuck to the Open Source Definition, and it has served us well. Open source communities have become the center of the innovation universe, giving us exceptional code like Linux, Kubernetes, Apache Kafka, and more.

  • It's MongoDB's turn to change its open source license

    The old maxim that the nice thing about standards is that there are so many to choose from could well apply to open source licensing. While now nearing a couple years old, the last WhiteSource Software survey of the top 10 open source licenses found close competition between the GPL, MIT, and Apache licenses. While the commercial-friendly Apache license has dominated the world of big data platforms and AI frameworks, MIT and GPL (which has "copyleft" provisions requiring developers to contribute back all modifications and enhancements) continues to be popular. GPL and variants such as the AGPL have been popular amongst vendors that seek to control their own open source projects, like MongoDB.

  • Matthew Garrett: Initial thoughts on MongoDB's new Server Side Public License

    MongoDB just announced that they were relicensing under their new Server Side Public License. This is basically the Affero GPL except with section 13 largely replaced with new text, as follows:

    "If you make the functionality of the Program or a modified version available to third parties as a service, you must make the Service Source Code available via network download to everyone at no charge, under the terms of this License. Making the functionality of the Program or modified version available to third parties as a service includes, without limitation, enabling third parties to interact with the functionality of the Program or modified version remotely through a computer network, offering a service the value of which entirely or primarily derives from the value of the Program or modified version, or offering a service that accomplishes for users the primary purpose of the Software or modified version.

    “Service Source Code” means the Corresponding Source for the Program or the modified version, and the Corresponding Source for all programs that you use to make the Program or modified version available as a service, including, without limitation, management software, user interfaces, application program interfaces, automation software, monitoring software, backup software, storage software and hosting software, all such that a user could run an instance of the service using the Service Source Code you make available."

    MongoDB admit that this license is not currently open source in the sense of being approved by the Open Source Initiative, but say:"We believe that the SSPL meets the standards for an open source license and are working to have it approved by the OSI."

    At the broadest level, AGPL requires you to distribute the source code to the AGPLed work[1] while the SSPL requires you to distribute the source code to everything involved in providing the service. Having a license place requirements around things that aren't derived works of the covered code is unusual but not entirely unheard of - the GPL requires you to provide build scripts even if they're not strictly derived works, and you could probably make an argument that the anti-Tivoisation provisions of GPL3 fall into this category.

Graphics: Mesa, DisplayPort's Forward Error Correction and New Driver From NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa Vulkan Drivers Move Ahead With PCI Bus Info, Calibrated Timestamps

    With this weekend's release of Vulkan 1.1.88 stealing the show was the Vulkan transform feedback capability to allow projects like DXVK to support Direct3D's Stream Output functionality. But besides VK_EXT_transform_feedback, there are other extensions also being worked on for Mesa ANV / RADV Vulkan driver coverage.

  • Intel DRM Linux Driver Working On DisplayPort Forward Error Correction

    DisplayPort's Forward Error Correction (FEC) is part of the specification since DP 1.4 and is for ensuring reliable, error-free video transport. Forward Error Correction allows for correcting link errors and a "glitch-free visual experience" by using a Reed-Solomon parity/correction check. The DisplayPort sink can detect and correct any small errors in the compressed video stream.

  • NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 Linux Benchmarks Will Be Coming

    NVIDIA's embargo for reviews on the GeForce RTX 2070 graphics cards has now expired ahead of the expected retail availability on Wednesday.

  • NVIDIA 410.66 Linux Driver Released With RTX 2070 Support, Vulkan Ray-Tracing, Etc

    NVIDIA has released the 410.66 Linux graphics driver today as their first stable release in the 410 series and comes with support for the new GeForce RTX 2070 graphics card.

    The main addition to the NVIDIA 410 Linux driver series is the initial Turing GPU support with the GeForce RTX 2070/2080 graphics cards. Besides enabling Turing support, the NVIDIA 410 driver has initial RTX ray-tracing support with Vulkan. The NVIDIA driver ships new libnvidia-rtcore.so and libnvidia-cbl.so libraries for this ray-tracing functionality. The OptiX ray-tracing engine is also bundled as libnvoptix.so.

Kernel: Linux 4.19 and Some New/Upcoming Features

Filed under
Linux
  • The Biggest Features Of Linux 4.19: Intel/AMD, CoC, 802.11ax, EROFS, GPS & GASKET

    With the Linux 4.19 kernel set to be released next weekend, here's a recap of the most prominent features to be found in this next kernel release.

  • Linux's LoRa Is Ready To Deliver Long-Range, Low-Power Wireless

    Adding to the long list of new features for what will be Linux 4.20 or likely renamed to Linux 5.0 per Linus Torvalds' numbering preferences is a new wireless networking subsystem within the kernel's networking code... Meet LoRa.

    LoRa is a long-range, low-power wireless standard with the bits planned for the mainline kernel been in the works for the past number of months. LoRa was developed for IoT use-cases and runs on sub-gigahertz radio frequency bands while aiming for transmissions that can span beyond 10 kilometers (6+ miles). LoRa is designed to be inexpensive and work out well for deployment in rural and remote environments. The frequencies that LoRa operates at also requires no licenses.

  • The Next Linux Kernel Will Bring More Drivers Converted To Use BLK-MQ I/O

    More Linux storage drivers have been converted to the "blk-mq" interfaces for the multi-queue block I/O queuing mechanism for the 4.20~5.0 kernel cycle.

    Blk-mq is capable of delivering much better performance with modern storage devices -- namely NVMe PCI Express SSDs but also SCSI drives. This code that's been part of the Linux kernel the past few years allows mapping I/O to multiple queues and distributing the tasks across multiple CPU threads, thus scaling better with today's multi-core servers, while also supporting multiple hardware queues of capable devices.

The Expected Feature We Didn't See Yet For Ubuntu 18.10 and Ubuntu Server's Latest

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The Expected Feature We Didn't See Yet For Ubuntu 18.10

    While Ubuntu 18.10 is set to roll out this week with its new theme and an assortment of package updates and other enhancements, there is one feature Canonical previously talked about for the Ubuntu 18.10 "Cosmic Cuttlefish" cycle that we have yet to see made public.

    After Canonical added a software/hardware survey on new installs for the Ubuntu 18.04 cycle to collect statistics on its users, for the Ubuntu 18.10 cycle is when they were planning on making that mass amount of data public. But unfortunately the 18.10 release is nearing this week and we've heard nothing out of Canonical on making this data public.

  • Ubuntu Server Is Making It Easier To Deploy Let's Encrypt SSL Certificates

    The Ubuntu Server developers are looking to make it easier to deploy free SSL/TLS certificates from Let's Encrypt.

    Robie Basak of Canonical has been working on a Snap package for Certbot, one of the command-line clients for automating the setup process of generating and deploying certificates from Let's Encrypt.

  • Ubuntu Server development summary – 16 Oct 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

Should GNOME Drop Support for GTK3 Themes?

Filed under
GNOME

The GNOME desktop has a problem, and we’re (partly) all to blame.

See, most of us enjoy customizing our Linux desktop to suit our preferred tastes. A dash of colour here, a splash of translucency there, and so on.

Malleableness is an assumption; distro users expect to be able to tweak, tune or toggle anything, they like, from integral kernel modules to superficial GTK3 themes.

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Mozilla Developments and Blurbs

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Going from New Laptop to Productive Mozillian

    My old laptop had so many great stickers on it I didn’t want to say goodbye. So I put off my hardware refresh cycle from the recommended 2 years to almost 3.

    To speak the truth it wasn’t only the stickers that made me wary of switching. I had a workflow that worked. The system wasn’t slow. It was only three years old.

    But then Windows started crashing on me during video calls. And my Firefox build times became long enough that I ported changes to my Linux desktop before building them. It was time to move on.

  • Show your support for Firefox with new badges

    Firefox is only as strong as its passionate users. Because we’re independent, people need to make a conscious choice to use a non-default browser on their system. We’re most successful when happy users tell others about an alternative worth trying.

  • At MozFest, Spend 7 Days Exploring Internet Health

    Workshops that teach you how to detect misinformation and mobile trackers. A series of art installations that turn online data into artwork. A panel about the unintended consequences of AI, featuring a former YouTube engineer and a former FBI agent. And a conversation with the inventor of the web.

    These are just a handful of the experiences at this year’s MozFest, Mozilla’s annual festival for, by, and about people who love the internet. From October 22-28 at the Royal Society of Arts (RSA) and Ravensbourne University in central London, more than 2,500 developers, designers, activists, and artists from dozens of countries will gather to explore privacy, security, openness, and inclusion online.

  • Using requestIdleCallback for long running computations

    One of the ways developers have tipically tried to keep a smooth web application, without interfering with the browser’s animation and response to input, is to use a Web Worker for long running computations. For example, in the Prism.js (a library for syntax highlighting) API there’s an async parameter to choose “Whether to use Web Workers to improve performance and avoid blocking the UI when highlighting very large chunks of code”.

  • These Weeks In Servo 115

    In the past three weeks, we merged 181 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

    Our Windows nightlies have been broken for several months for a number of reasons, and we have now fixed all of the known breakage. If you’re a Windows user, give our latest builds a try! You can visit arbitrary URLs by pressing Ctr+L.

    The Android Components project added a component to use Servo in any Android app.

Security: Reproducible Builds, MikroTik, TLS and Updates

Filed under
Security

Turn Your Old PC into a Retrogaming Console with Lakka Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Gaming
HowTos

Meet Lakka, a lightweight Linux distribution that will transform your old or low-end computer (like Raspberry Pi) into a complete retrogaming console,

When I say retrogaming console, I am serious about the console part. If you have ever used a PlayStation of Xbox, you know what a typical console interface looks like.

Lakka provides a similar interface and a similar experience. I’ll talk about the ‘experience’ later. Have a look at the interface first.

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New Paper From Mark Shuttleworth and Eben Moglen

Filed under
Ubuntu
Legal
  • Automotive Software Governance and Copyleft

    The Software Freedom Law Center is proud to make available a whitepaper by Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical, Ltd., and Eben Moglen, Founding Director of the Software Freedom Law Center and Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. The whitepaper shows how new capabilities in the free and open source software stack enable highly regulated and sensitive industrial concerns to take advantage of the full spectrum of modern copyleft software.

    Software embedded in physical devices now determines how almost everything – from coffee pots and rice cookers to oil tankers and passenger airplanes – works. Safety and security, efficiency and repairability, fitness for purpose and adaptability to new conditions of all the physical products that we make and use now depend on our methods for developing, debugging, maintaining, securing and servicing the software embedded in them.

  • SFLC: Automotive Software Governance and Copyleft

    The Software Freedom Law Center has announced the availability of a whitepaper [PDF] about automotive software and copyleft, written by Mark Shuttleworth and Eben Moglen. At its core, it's an advertisement for Ubuntu and Snap, but it does look at some of the issues involved.

Automotive Grade Linux dips into telematics with 6.0 release

Filed under
Linux

The Automotive Grade Linux project has released Unified Code Base 6.0 in-vehicle infotainment stack with new software profiles for telematics and instrument cluster.

The Linux Foundation’s Automotive Grade Linux project version 6.0 (“Funky Flounder”) of its Unified Code Base 6.0 distribution is now available for download. The new release for the first time expands the open source in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) stack to support telematics hooks and instrument cluster displays.

“The addition of the telematics and instrument cluster profiles opens up new deployment possibilities for AGL,” stated Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “Motorcycles, fleet services, rental car tracking, basic economy cars with good old-fashioned radios, essentially any vehicle without a head unit or infotainment display can now leverage the AGL Unified Code Base as a starting point for their products.”

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Raspberry Pi based garden monitoring system supplies five sensors

Filed under
Linux

On Kickstarter: SwitchDoc Labs’ “Smart Garden System” is a Raspberry Pi and Grove-based environmental monitoring and plant watering system with sensors for soil moisture, sunlight, air quality, temperature, and humidity.

Spokane Valley, Wash. based SwitchDoc Labs (SDL) has launched a more advanced, up to nine plant Smart Garden System (SGS) kit version of its earlier SmartPlantPi kit. The Raspberry Pi based kit, which requires no soldering, is promoted as being an educational system for learning about gardening as well as the Raspberry Pi and IoT technology.

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Elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" Released For A Pleasant Linux Desktop Experience

Filed under
OS

Just ahead of Ubuntu 18.10, Solus 4, and Fedora 29 among other forthcoming Linux distribution releases, Elementary OS 5 "Juno" has been released for a polished desktop experience that aims to compete with macOS and Windows for desktop usability.

Elementary OS 5.0 "Juno" continues to be based upon Ubuntu for its package set but continues with its own Pantheon desktop environment and remains quite focused on delivering a polished desktop experience. With the 5.0 Juno release they focused on refining the user experience, improving productivity, and taking their developer platform to the next level.

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Plasma 5.14.1

Filed under
KDE

Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.14.1. Plasma 5.14 was released in October with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience.

Read more

Also: KDE Plasma 5.14 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Update Now

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More in Tux Machines

Kickstarting the Makerphone: an open-source hardware phone kit, programmable with python and Scratch

Circuitmess's fully funded Makerphone kickstarter is raising money to produce open source hardware smartphone kits to teach kids (and grownups) everything from soldering to programming. The Makerphone is a pretty sweet-looking gadget, and it comes ready to be programmed with Scratch and python, providing a good progression from a fully graphic programming environment to a command-line language that's still beginner-friendly. $94 gets you a kit and the tools to assemble it; $99 gets you an assembled phone. The project's runners have previously delivered on kickstarted open source hardware kits, which bodes well for getting something for your money. Read more

Graphics: Mesa 18.2.3, AMDVLK and Intel KVMGT

  • mesa 18.2.3
    Mesa 18.2.3 is now available. In this release we have: Different patches for the DirectX9 and DRI state trackers. Several fixes and workarounds for different games, inlcuding RAGE, Yakuza and The Evil Within, Wolfenstein The Old Blood ARMA 3, or No Mans Sky. A bunch of fixes for different drivers, including r600, nouveau, radeonsi, anv, radv, virgl, i965, nvc0 or nv50. Worth to mention a fix for GPU hangs in Radeonsi. State Trackers also get different fixes and corrections. Finally, fixes for GLSL and NIR are also in this queue.
  • Mesa 18.2.3 Released With Latest Driver Workarounds For Steam Play / Proton
    Mesa 18.2.3 is out today as the latest point release to the Mesa 18.2 stable series. Notable to this point release are several bug fixes and workarounds to benefit Steam Play / Wine (and the Valve downstream Proton) and various new games being brought up there thanks in part to DXVK. The games with workarounds in Mesa 18.2.3 are Rage, Yakuza, The Evil Within, Wolfenstein: The Old Blood, ARMA 3, and No Man's Sky. These workarounds are added to the common Mesa DRIRC for toggling certain features as opposed to driver-specific hacks.
  • AMDVLK Radeon Vulkan Driver Updated With A Slew Of Additions
    It had been more than two weeks since the last time AMD developers updated their public source trees making up the official AMDVLK Vulkan driver but fortunately that has now changed. Given the time since the last commit, there is a lot of goodies with this new AMDVLK driver refresh.
  • Intel KVMGT 2018-Q3 Released As Their Latest Open-Source GPU Virtualization Bits
    Intel developers today announced the release of KVMGT 2018-Q3 (also known as Intel GVT-g for KVM) as well as the accompany Xen hypervisor tailored XenGT 2018-Q3 update. These are the latest quarterly updates to the Intel technology stack for allowing GPU virtualization of their HD/UHD/Iris Graphics hardware with mediated pass-through on Linux systems. This GPU virtualization support continues working with Intel 5th Gen Core/Xeon "Broadwell" processors and newer with guest operating systems being Linux as well as Windows 7 or newer.

Some Initial PostgreSQL 11.0 Database Benchmarks

Among other software releases, yesterday brought the debut of the PostgreSQL 11.0 database server. Given it has possible performance enhancements and the new (non-default) LLVM-based just-in-time compilation ability, I decided to run some benchmarks on the powerful Dell PowerEdge EPYC 2P server. PostgreSQL 11.0 is a big update for this popular database server. Those unfamiliar with its changes can find the details via the release notes. Details on the LLVM JIT back-end can be found via the in-tree documentation. The just-in-time compilation support didn't get enabled by default with PostgreSQL 11.0 due to open performance issues, but can be manually enabled for those wishing to run experiments or happen to be running a lot of complex queries where the JIT capability is likely to pay off. Read more

Hacker friendly LapPi laptop kit runs on Raspberry Pi 3B+

SB Components is Kickstartering a Raspberry Pi based “LapPi” laptop kit with 7- or 5-inch screens, keyboard, camera, speakers, and 3800mAh battery, starting at $220 with an RPi 3B+ or $178 without. SB Components has successfully funded its DIY LapPi kit on Kickstarter, and packages are available through Nov. 10 with December delivery. The company is known for its PiTalk smartphone and other Raspberry Pi add-on kits, which are available as options. Read more