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Monday, 19 Aug 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Things You Should Know About Linux Instant Messaging Programs

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

One of the highly-desirable features of Linux – a primary reason that developers prefer it to other operating systems – is that it has been improved with a lot of free and open-source program. Many of the above platforms reflect this, making them powerful options for growing businesses looking into their software options as they scale. They’re also strong options for businesses for whom security is the highest priority, which is becoming a greater focus for organizations every day.

From personal to professional, Linux-based instant messaging programs can offer you flexibility, communication, and security. If you’re running a Linux operating platform, make sure you look into this list of mainstream and alternative chat options for a reliable and robust messenger experience.

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Linux and Hardware: XScale IOP, Adlink and eMMC Flash Memory

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Linux 5.4 Set To Remove Intel XScale IOP33X/IOP13XX CPU Support

    Linux 5.4 is set to remove the Intel IOP33X and IOP13XX series of processors that are part of the company's former XScale product line for ARM-based CPUs. 

    The XScale IOP processors were intended for handling I/O offloading from the main device CPU. These sub-1.2GHz processors were part of Intel's ARMv8.5-based XScale product portfolio. But with no apparent users of the Intel IOP33X/IOP13XX hardware left -- at least anyone that would likely be riding new Linux kernel releases -- that support is going to be removed later this year with the Linux 5.4 release. 

  • Type 2 customers can now update to Skylake and Kaby Lake

    Adlink has released two Linux-ready COM Express Basic Type 2 modules for legacy customers: The Express-SL2 offers Intel 6th Gen and the Express-KL2 features 7th Gen processors.

    Back in 2014, Adlink launched a pair of COM Express Type 2 drop-in replacement modules running on Intel 4th Gen. Core (Express-HL2) and Bay Trail Atom (cExpress-BT2). We had thought that might be the end of Type 2 replacement products. Yet, there are still many customers that are not ready to move to the identically sized (125 x 95mm) Basic Type 6. As a result, Adlink is back with the 6th Gen Skylake Express-SL2 and 7th Gen Kaby Lake Express-KL2 to keep legacy Type 2 customers up to date “for at least another 10 years,” says the company.

  • Wear Estimation for Devices with eMMC Flash Memory

Canonical Outs Major Linux Kernel Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

Filed under
Ubuntu

Available for Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 ESM (Trusty Tahr), the new Linux kernel security updates are here to patch more than 30 security vulnerabilities, including a heap buffer overflow discovered in the Marvell Wireless LAN device driver and a NULL pointer dereference discovered in the Near-field communication (NFC) implementation.

The security patch also addresses a use-after-free vulnerability discovered by Google Project Zero's Jann Horn in the Linux kernel when accessing LDT entries, as well as a race condition when performing core dumps. A flaw discovered by Andrei Vlad Lutas and Dan Lutas in x86 processors, which incorrectly handled SWAPGS instructions during speculative execution, was fixed as well.

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The Best App Launchers for Ubuntu & Linux Mint

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

So, thankfully, there is a world of alternative app launchers for Linux desktops — launchers that are more traditional, more interactive, and/or often more capable than what Ubuntu includes out of the box.

Inspired by my recent play with rofi on the Regolith desktop I decided to test a bunch of ’em to compile this: a list of the best app launchers for Ubuntu and Linux Mint (in my opinion, of course).

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Stable kernels 5.2.9, 4.19.67, and 4.14.139

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.2.9

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.2.9 kernel.

    All users of the 5.2 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.2.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.2.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 4.19.67
  • Linux 4.14.139

Feral GameMode on Ubuntu: Everything You Need to Know

Filed under
Ubuntu

Feral GameMode is a discreet background utility that aims to improve gaming performance on Linux distributions like Ubuntu.

It’s not a GUI app; there’s no multi-button dashboard, no toggle-fest, and no real feedback on how it’s running.

Games compatible with GameMode are able to ‘request’ that a specific set of tweaks are applied to the host system and/or the game process(es) for a short period.

These tweaks ensure system resources prioritise the gaming experience over other tasks, like drawing your desktop background or checking for updates.

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today's howtos and programming leftovers

Filed under
Development
HowTos
  • Linux Commands for Beginners 15 - Bash History
  • How To Find Top Most Used Commands On Linux
  • ANNOUNCE: libnbd 0.9.8 - prerelease of high performance NBD
    I'm pleased to announce a new high performance Network Block Device
    (NBD) client library called libnbd.  It's written in C and there are
    also bindings available for Python, OCaml and (soon) Rust.
    
    0.9.8 is the third pre-release before the stable 1.0 version where we
    freeze the API, so feedback on API-related issues is very welcome now.
    
    Download:       http://download.libguestfs.org/libnbd/
    Documentation:  https://github.com/libguestfs/libnbd/blob/master/docs/libnbd.pod
    Fedora package: https://koji.fedoraproject.org/koji/packageinfo?packageID=28807
    Debian package: https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=933223
    Git repo:       https://github.com/libguestfs/libnbd
    Mailing list:   address@hidden (no subscription required)
    
    Here are some of the things you can do with this library ...
    
    Connect to an NBD server and grab the first sector of the disk:
    https://github.com/libguestfs/libnbd/blob/a5f8fd2f0f48e9cf2487e23750b55f67b166014f/examples/simple-fetch-first-sector.c#L14
    
    High performance multi-threaded reads and writes, with multiple
    connections and multiple commands in flight on each connection:
    https://github.com/libguestfs/libnbd/blob/master/examples/threaded-reads-and-writes.c
    
    Integrate with glib main loop:
    https://github.com/libguestfs/libnbd/blob/master/examples/glib-main-loop.c
    
    Connect to an NBD server from an interactive shell:
    
      $ nbdkit -f linuxdisk . &
      $ nbdsh --connect nbd://localhost
    
      Welcome to nbdsh, the shell for interacting with
      Network Block Device (NBD) servers.
    
      nbd> h.get_size()
      716266496
      nbd> buf = h.pread (512, 0)
      nbd> print ("%r" % buf)
      [prints the first sector]
    
    Use ‘fio’ to benchmark an NBD server:
    
      $ nbdkit -U - memory size=256M \
            --run 'export unixsocket ; fio examples/nbd.fio '
    
    Rich.
    

  • libnbd 0.9.8 and stable APIs

    I announced libnbd yesterday. The libnbd 0.9.8 is a pre-release for the upcoming 1.0 where we will finalize the API and offer API and ABI stability. Stable APIs aren’t in fashion these days, but they’re important because people who choose to use your platform for their software shouldn’t be screwed over and have to change their software every time you change your mind. In C it’s reasonably easy to offer a stable API while allowing long term evolution and even incompatible changes. This is what we do for nbdkit and will be doing for libnbd. The first concept to get to know is ELF symbol versioning. Chapter 3 of Uli’s paper on the subject covers this in great detail. In libnbd all our initial symbols will be labelled with LIBNBD_1.0.

  • PyCharm 2019.2.1 RC

    PyCharm 2019.2.1 release candidate is available now!

  • Basics of Memory Management in Python

    Memory management is the process of efficiently allocating, de-allocating, and coordinating memory so that all the different processes run smoothly and can optimally access different system resources. Memory management also involves cleaning memory of objects that are no longer being accessed.

    In Python, the memory manager is responsible for these kinds of tasks by periodically running to clean up, allocate, and manage the memory. Unlike C, Java, and other programming languages, Python manages objects by using reference counting. This means that the memory manager keeps track of the number of references to each object in the program. When an object's reference count drops to zero, which means the object is no longer being used, the garbage collector (part of the memory manager) automatically frees the memory from that particular object.

    The user need not to worry about memory management as the process of allocation and de-allocation of memory is fully automatic. The reclaimed memory can be used by other objects.

  • Twisted 19.7.0 Released

    On behalf of Twisted Matrix Laboratories and our long-suffering release manager Amber Brown, I am honored to announce the release of Twisted 19.7.0!

Games: Filament, Dota Underlords and Cerulean Days

Filed under
Gaming
  • Solve cable-based puzzles in the fully narrated game Filament, coming to Linux next year

    Currently in development by Beard Envy with publishing from Kasedo Games, the puzzle game Filament has you exploring a seemingly abandoned spaceship while sorting out all the cables.

    From what they said about it, it's a story-rich and full narrated puzzle game. One that's meant to be somewhat relaxing with you able to go at your own pace. Going by the official announcement, Linux support is confirmed for release sometime in Q1 next year.

  • Dota Underlords changes ranking again to be more about skill and less about time

    While in Early Access, Dota Underlords is in a constant state of flux and Valve have again changed the ranking system.

    They're now using the well-known Elo rating system, so the number of points gained or lost now depends on the skill of your opponents. Why the switch? As Valve said, the Lords of White Spire leaderboard ended up being a list of who played the most instead of the best so they're hoping this will solve it and be a little more fair to those who don't play all the time.

  • Cerulean Days, a Visual Novel following the internet being shut down after a biological attack

    Cerulean Days certainly sounds like an intriguing Visual Novel. Set on a small modern island in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, a deadly biological attack took place so the government shut the internet down, leaving the island disconnected from the world around it.

    [...]

    If you're interested in trying it out, they do have a Linux demo available, looks like it was made with Ren'Py and it works quite well. Seems like it has some nice writing to it too along with some great artwork.

Audiocasts/Shows: Linux in the Ham Shack, Sliding Politics and PyBites

Filed under
Interviews
  • LHS Episode #297: The Weekender XXXII

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Sliding Politics | User Error 72

    Dealing with users who hate change, dumb phones, and different approaches to social media consumption.

    Plus infidelity, the state of the world, and consequences of small decisions.

  • Test and Code: 83: PyBites Code Challenges behind the scenes - Bob Belderbos

    Bob Belderbos and Julian Sequeira started PyBites a few years ago.
    They started doing code challanges along with people around the world and writing about it.

    Then came the codechalleng.es platform, where you can do code challenges in the browser and have your answer checked by pytest tests. But how does it all work?

    Bob joins me today to go behind the scenes and share the tech stack running the PyBites Code Challenges platform.

    We talk about the technology, the testing, and how it went from a cool idea to a working platform.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • vBSDCon - Sept 5-7 Reston VA

    The schedule has been added to the website: https://www.vbsdcon.com/schedule/

  • Raspberry Digital Signage donation

    The build of Raspberry Digital Signage you can download from SourceForge is limited is some functionality: if you like this project please donate.

    As a donor, you will have full access to the unrestricted versions of: Raspberry Digital Signage (web-based digital signaging), Raspberry Slideshow (image/video slideshow-based digital signaging) and Raspberry WebKiosk (cheap web kiosking), which can be deployed on how many devices you wish!

Open Hardware and ARM

Filed under
Hardware
OSS
  • Designing open audio hardware as DIY kits

    Previously in this series about people who are developing audio technology in the open, I interviewed Juan Rios, developer and maintainer of Guayadeque and Sander Jansen, developer and maintainer of Goggles Music Manager. These conversations have broadened my thinking and helped me enjoy their software even more than before.

    For this article, I contacted Håvard Skrödahl, founder of Muffsy. His hobby is designing open source audio hardware, and he offers his designs as kits for those of us who can't wait to wind up the soldering iron for another adventure.

    I've built two of Håvard's kits: a moving coil (MC) cartridge preamp and a moving magnet (MM) cartridge phono preamp. Both were a lot of fun to build and sound great. They were also a bit of a stroll down memory lane for me. In my 20s, I built some other audio kits, including a Hafler DH-200 power amplifier and a DH-110 preamplifier. Before that, I built a power amplifier using a Motorola circuit design; both the design and the amplifier were lost along the way, but they were a lot of fun!

  • Nuvoton Launches Brand New M261/M262/M263 Series MCUs for IoT Applications

    Low power and robust security are two major requirements for the Internet of Things (IoT) applications. In terms of low power consumption, NuMicro M261/M262/M263 series provides multiple power modes for different operating scenarios, integrating RTC with independent VBAT to support low power mode. The power consumption in normal run mode is 97 μA/MHz (LDO mode) and 45 μA/MHz (DC-DC mode). Standby power-down current is down to 2.8 μA and Deep power-down current is less than 2 μA. The low power, low supply voltage, and fast wake-up (9 μs from Fast-wakeup Power-down mode) features make M261/M262/M263 series suitable for battery-powered IoT applications.

    The robust security functions of NuMicro M261/M262/M263 series include secure boot function to ensure that a device boots using only trusted software through a series of digital signature authentication processes. The M261/M262/M263 series integrates complete hardware crypto engines such as AES 256/192/128, DES/3-DES, SHA, ECC, and True Random Number Generator (TRNG). Furthermore, it provides 4-region programable eXecute-Only-Memory (XOM) to secure critical program codes and up to six tamper detection pins against outer physical attack, which significantly improves the product security.

    [...]

    Third-Party IDEs such as Keil MDK, IAR EWARM, and NuEclipse IDE with GNU GCC compilers are also supported.

  • Arm, WDC and Qualcomm Announce OpenChain Conformance Activities

    Arm and Western Digital Corporation, Platinum Members of the OpenChain Project and key participants in the global supply chain, today announce conformance with the OpenChain Specification. Qualcomm Technologies, Inc., Platinum Member and founding contributor of the OpenChain Project, today announces expanded conformance to the latest version of the OpenChain Specification.

    The OpenChain Project establishes trust in the open source from which software solutions are built. It accomplishes this by making open source license compliance simpler and more consistent. The OpenChain Specification defines inflection points in business workflows where a compliance process, policy or training should exist to minimize the potential for errors and maximize the efficiency of bringing solutions to market. The companies involved in the OpenChain community number in the hundreds. The OpenChain Specification is being prepared for submission to ISO and evolution from a growing de facto standard into a formal standard.

Graphics: Radeon (AMD) Software for Linux 19.30 and Intel Code

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Radeon Software for Linux 19.30 Updated With Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS Support

    In addition to AMD releasing the Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 19.Q3 Linux driver, they also quietly released a new Radeon Software Linux driver release for consumer GPUs.

    This new Radeon Software for Linux release is still in the 19.30 release stream as was the case since the AMD Navi launch driver one month ago. But with this updated Radeon Software for Linux 19.30 driver they now are claiming official support for the Radeon RX 5700 (Navi) series.

  • Intel Volleys Another Batch Of Tiger Lake "Gen 12" Graphics Code

    While it remains to be seen if Tiger Lake will be able to ship on time in 2020 as the Icelake successor, the "Gen 12" Xe Graphics continue to be worked on with the company's open-source Linux graphics driver.

    At the end of June Intel sent out the very preliminary open-source Linux graphics driver changes for Tiger Lake that is coming with "Gen 12" graphics compared to Gen 11 with Icelake. Though so far at least there hasn't been too many changes to the driver side while today a third round of Tiger Lake enablement patches were sent out.

Etnaviv Is Packing Code For An Exciting Linux 5.4 Cycle

Filed under
Linux

While Freedreno and Panfrost have been steaming ahead when it comes to open-source, reverse-engineered graphics for Arm SoCs, the Etnaviv project for targeting Vivante graphics hasn't had too much to report on recently. Fortunately, that's changing as coming up for the Linux 5.4 cycle they have a lot of new code to introduce.

The biggest Etnaviv DRM driver feature for Linux 5.4 is supporting per-process address spaces on capable GPUs, which is necessary for bringing up their Softpin support and in turn supporting the texture descriptor buffers on GC7000 series hardware.

Read more

Also: QEMU 4.1 Released With Many ARM, MIPS & x86 Additions

ClockworkPi Rolls Out GameShell, A DIY Kit To Build Your Own Modular Console

Filed under
Hardware
Gaming

ClockworkPI is providing tech enthusiasts the opportunity to build their own modular console with the GameShell.

The gadget is the result of the Kickstarter launched in April 2018. The campaign raised a total of $290,429 or almost six times the original goal of $50,000. Nearly 3,000 people pledged money for the company to push through with the project.

The gadget was billed to be the first mobile and modular game console using an open-source GNU/Linux system. After building the kit, you can play thousands of retro games from major publishers like Atari, SNES, NES, GBA, and GB.

Read more

Kdevops Introduced

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • kdevops: a devops framework for Linux kernel development

    I'm announcing the release of kdevops which aims at making setting up and testing the Linux kernel for any project as easy as possible. Note that setting up testing for a subsystem and testing a subsystem are two separate operations, however we strive for both. This is not a new test framework, it allows you to use existing frameworks, and set those frameworks up as easily can humanly be possible. It relies on a series of modern hip devops frameworks, it relies on ansible, vagrant and terraform, ansible roles through the Ansible Galaxy, and terraform modules.

  • Kdevops Aims To Assist In Linux Kernel Testing

    Luis Chamberlain has announced the first release of Kdevops as a Linux kernel development "DevOps" framework.

    Kdevops aims to be the first modern devops framework for the Linux kernel. Kdevops can target different virtualization platforms, cloud providers, and Linux distributions. This devops framework is built off Ansible, Vagrant, and Terraform while it doesn't integrate any testing frameworks itself but leaves that open to the developer for integration.

Popular mpv Player is now Celluloid

Filed under
Software
Movies

The popular media player mpv is renamed as Celluloid and released latest installment.

Celluloid (formerly GNOME mpv) is a GTK+ based free and open source media player. Celluloid is very lightweight and can easily be adapated as an alternative to popular VLC Media player. This slick media player interacts with mpv via the client API exported by libmpv, allowing access to mpv’s powerful playback capabilities.

Some notable features of Celluloid includes the implementation of MPRIS D-Bus Interface which allows for better integration with desktop environments that have compatible MPRIS clients, fully functional Wayland support.

Read more

Cockpit and the evolution of the Web User Interface

Filed under
Server

This article only touches upon some of the main functions available in Cockpit. Managing storage devices, networking, user account, and software control will be covered in an upcoming article. In addition, optional extensions such as the 389 directory service, and the cockpit-ostree module used to handle packages in Fedora Silverblue.

The options continue to grow as more users adopt Cockpit. The interface is ideal for admins who want a light-weight interface to control their server(s).

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Patches, IPFire 2.23 Core Update 135, Kaspersky in the Middle

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (kernel and openssl), Debian (ffmpeg, golang-1.11, imagemagick, kde4libs, openldap, and python3.4), Fedora (gradle, hostapd, kdelibs3, and mgetty), Gentoo (adobe-flash, hostapd, mariadb, patch, thunderbird, and vlc), Mageia (elfutils, mariadb, mythtv, postgresql, and redis), openSUSE (chromium, kernel, LibreOffice, and zypper, libzypp and libsolv), Oracle (ghostscript), Red Hat (rh-php71-php), SUSE (bzip2, evince, firefox, glib2, glibc, java-1_8_0-openjdk, polkit, postgresql10, python3, and squid), and Ubuntu (firefox).

  • IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 135 is ready for testing

    after a little break with many things to fight, we are back with a brand new Core Update which is packed with various bug fixes and cleanup of a lot of code.

  • Wladimir Palant: Kaspersky in the Middle - what could possibly go wrong?

    Roughly a decade ago I read an article that asked antivirus vendors to stop intercepting encrypted HTTPS connections, this practice actively hurting security and privacy. As you can certainly imagine, antivirus vendors agreed with the sensible argument and today no reasonable antivirus product would even consider intercepting HTTPS traffic. Just kidding… Of course they kept going, and so two years ago a study was published detailing the security issues introduced by interception of HTTPS connections. Google and Mozilla once again urged antivirus vendors to stop. Surely this time it worked? Of course not. So when I decided to look into Kaspersky Internet Security in December last year, I found it breaking up HTTPS connections so that it would get between the server and your browser in order to “protect” you. Expecting some deeply technical details about HTTPS protocol misimplementations now? Don’t worry, I don’t know enough myself to inspect Kaspersky software on this level. The vulnerabilities I found were far more mundane.

Replicating Particle Collisions at CERN with Kubeflow

This is where Kubeflow comes in. They started by training their 3DGAN on an on-prem OpenStack cluster with 4 GPUs. To verify that they were not introducing overhead by using Kubeflow, they ran training first with native containers, then on Kubernetes, and finally on Kubeflow using the MPI operator. They then moved to an Exoscale cluster with 32 GPUs and ran the same experiments, recording only negligible performance overhead. This was enough to convince them that they had discovered a flexible, versatile means of deploying their models to a wide variety of physical environments. Beyond the portability that they gained from Kubeflow, they were especially pleased with how straightforward it was to run their code. As part of the infrastructure team, Ricardo plugged Sofia’s existing Docker image into Kubeflow’s MPI operator. Ricardo gave Sofia all the credit for building a scalable model, whereas Sofia credited Ricardo for scaling her team’s model. Thanks to components like the MPI operator, Sofia’s team can focus on building better models and Ricardo can empower other physicists to scale their own models. Read more Also: Issue #2019.08.19 – Kubeflow at CERN

Programming: Sanjog Sigdel's Work on LibreOffice and Python Picks

  • The Document Foundation/LibreOffice Community Member Monday: Sanjog Sigdel

    I’m currently a Graduate Student pursuing my MTech. in IT degree here in Kathmandu University, Dhulikhel, Nepal. Besides that, I am also a part-time instructor in a private college near the University: NIST College Banepa. I love knowing how new technologies work and also love exploring new places. Unitil now I have traveled almost 30 districts of Nepal via trekking, project monitoring and tours. I’ve been using Linux-based operating systems (mainly Ubuntu) since 2012. And I am also a FOSS activist/volunteer. I teach my students to use open source software and most of them are using Linux, LibreOffice, and Python programming in the Nano text editor :-)

  • Debugging Python Applications with the PDB Module

    In this tutorial, we are going to learn how to use Python's PDB module for debugging Python applications. Debugging refers to the process of removing software and hardware errors from a software application. PDB stands for "Python Debugger", and is a built-in interactive source code debugger with a wide range of features, like pausing a program, viewing variable values at specific instances, changing those values, etc. In this article, we will be covering the most commonly used functionalities of the PDB module.

  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Paul Ganssle

    This week we welcome Paul Ganssle (@pganssle) as our PyDev of the Week. Paul is the maintainer of the dateutil package and also a maintainer of the setuptools project. You can catch up with Paul on his website or check out some of his talks. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Paul better!

  • Image Process Plugin 1.2.0 for Pelican Released

    Image Process is a plugin for Pelican, a static site generator written in Python. Image Process let you automate the processing of images based on their class attribute. Use this plugin to minimize the overall page weight and to save you a trip to Gimp or Photoshop each time you include an image in your post. Image Process is used by this blog’s theme to resize the source images so they are the correct size for thumbnails on the main index page and the larger size they are displayed at on top of the articles.

  • Top 7 Compelling Reasons to Hire Ukrainian Developers

    Many people consider offshore development. They seek quality for a lower cost and look where to hire developers. Customers search online, read reviews, or ask for referrals to find the software development team that best fits their goals. Ukraine has become one of the top locations where customers across Europe, Asia, and North America go for developers to build their products from scratch.

  • How to Find and Hire a Python/Django Development Company

    Even though there are about 22 million developers in the world (according to a Nexten.io study), good Python/Django developers aren’t easy to find and can be quite expensive. But there are many job marketplaces for software development companies and individual Python developers. Where you can find profiles of software development companies and their projects, reviews and ratings from current and former clients.

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