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Tuesday, 18 Jun 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Regolith Linux is the i3 Ubuntu Spin You’ve Been Waiting For

Filed under
Ubuntu

Okay, okay. If you are sat there mouthing “what is i3?” at me with a confused, borderline-desperate look on your face, I’ll fill you in:

i3 is a tiling window manager created for X11 (the display manager most Linux distros use, including Ubuntu). i3 supports traditional horizontal vertical window tiling — think window snapping, but arranged and resized automatically — as well as stacking and tabbing.

The differences don’t end there, though.

Like me, you’re probably used to managing app windows with a mouse, but the i3 window manager is largely keyboard driven. The idea is that you use keyboard shortcuts to move, manage and arrange open apps and windows (though you can use a mouse too).

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Give Ubuntu a Bold New Look with the Qogir Theme

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

The background imagery in the Nautilus file manager (the effect also apparently works with Nemo, but I haven’t tested it) is the most visually striking element in the Qogir theme.

It’s a love it/hate it gimmick, which explains why it’s rarely used. Personally I enjoy the visual flourish it adds (though it certainly helps if your desktop wallpaper compliments it).

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Ubuntu: LXD, New Stuff and Snaps

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Development in LXD

    Most of my development is done in LXD containers. I love this for a few reasons. It takes all of my development dependencies and makes it so that they're not installed on my host system, reducing the attack surface there. It means that I can do development on any Linux that I want (or several). But it also means that I can migrate my development environment from my laptop to my desktop depending on whether I need more CPU or whether I want it to be closer to where I'm working (usually when travelling).

    When I'm traveling I use my Pagekite SSH setup on a Raspberry Pi as the SSH gateway. So when I'm at home I want to connect to the desktop directly, but when away connect through the gateway.

  • Snap Store Is Available for Ubuntu!, How to Install It?

    Snap is a software used to install software packages that can run on various Linux distributions. This time Snap Store can be installed and used like using the Software Center (on Ubuntu), or GNOME Software. This application was created specifically to make it easier for users when installing software packages on Snap.

    Actually, the Ubuntu Software Center and GNOME software can add the url of a software package and install it. But both of these applications will mix search results that are snap, flatpak and others.

  • Use Font Finder to Install Google Fonts on Ubuntu

    If you are in search of finding and using some pretty fonts for your Ubuntu desktop, applications, and web pages, Font Finder is there for your help.

  • An OpenJPEG Surprise

    My previous blog post seems to have resolved most concerns about my requests for Ubuntu stable release updates, but I again received rather a lot of criticism for the choice to make WebKit depend on OpenJPEG, even though my previous post explained clearly why there are are not any good alternatives.

    I was surprised to receive a pointer to ffmpeg, which has its own JPEG 2000 decoder that I did not know about. However, we can immediately dismiss this option due to legal problems with depending on ffmpeg. I also received a pointer to a resurrected libjasper, which is interesting, but since libjasper was removed from Ubuntu, its status is not currently better than OpenJPEG.

    But there is some good news! I have looked through Ubuntu’s security review of the OpenJPEG code and found some surprising results. Half the reported issues affect the library’s companion tools, not the library itself. And the other half of the issues affect the libmj2 library, a component of OpenJPEG that is not built by Ubuntu and not used by WebKit. So while these are real security issues that raise concerns about the quality of the OpenJPEG codebase, none of them actually affect OpenJPEG as used by WebKit. Yay!

  • Call for testing: chromium-browser deb to snap transition

    The chromium browser has been available as a deb package for all supported Ubuntu releases and as a snap since version 60, and the time has come to start transitioning away from the debs.

  • Canonical Announces Embedded Computer Manifold 2 for Drone Developers, Request For Help Testing Snap Package, PHP v7.4.0 Available, PyCharm 2019.2 EAP3 Released, Talks To Port Over Microsoft's Chromium-Based Edge browser To Linux

    Yesterday, Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu announced the availability of Manifold 2, a high-performance embedded computer offered by leading enterprise drone manufacturer, DJI. This availability will allow developers access to containerized software packages (e.g. Snaps), allowing for infinite evolution and functionality changes.

    It looks as if Ubuntu is transitioning the Chromium Debian package to a Snap one. The community behind this effort is asking for assistance in testing the Snap package.

An Overview to deepin 15.10 GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

For users who want to know latest deepin 15.10 before downloading it, this article is for you. In this version, deepin once again fulfills its commitment to be pretty and user friendly, as it brings a lot of new improvements in shapes and performance. Nw it introduces Auto Merge on desktop, along with new control for Sound Effects. The file manager got Advanced Search. It even got a new window manager, called dde-kwin, modified from KDE Kwin. And now it is rebased to Debian Stable instead of Unstable, for the users to get more timely security updates. I hope this short overview gives you enough information to finally try deepin 15.10.

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Kernel: Linux Plumbers Conference, Wacom, ZFS On Linux and arch_status

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Open Printing Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

    We are pleased to announce that the Open Printing Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! In today’s world much is done online. But getting a hardcopy is still very much needed, even today. Then there’s the case of having a hardcopy and wanting to scan it to make it digital. All of this is needed to be functional on Linux to keep Linux-based and open source operating systems relevant. Also, with the progress in technology, the usage of modern printers and scanners is becoming simple. The driverless concept has made printing and scanning easier and gets the job done with some simple clicks without requiring the user to install any kind of driver software. The Open Printing organization has been tasked with getting this job done. This Microconference will focus on what needs to be accomplished to keep Linux and open source operating systems a leader in today’s market.

  • The Newest Wacom Intuos Pro Small Drawing Tablet To Be Supported By Linux 5.3

    Wacom's second-generation Intuos Pro Small digital drawing tablet will be supported by the upcoming Linux 5.3 kernel.

    Wacom drawing tablets continue to see improved Linux driver support and for this next cycle is support for this newest version of the Intuos Pro Small, a smaller tablet version coming in at about six inches by four inches (approximately 15 x 10 cm). While small, it still commands a premium at around $250 USD.

  • ZFS On Linux 0.8.1 Brings Many Fixes, Linux 5.2 Compatibility Bits

    Released at the end of May was the huge ZFS On Linux 0.8 release with many new features like native encryption, TRIM/discard support for SSDs, device removal, Python 3 compatibility with its tooling, pool check-points, and much more. Out today is now the first maintenance release following that big release.

  • /proc/pid/arch_status Is Coming To Show Architecture-Specific Details Of A Given Task

    To be exposed via /proc/[pid]/arch_status is a new interface for exposing architectural-specific information for a given Linux process.

    When CONFIG_PROC_PID_ARCH_STATUS is enabled, there will be this new arch_status file to expose any extra architecture specific information for a given task. At this point, it's just exposing the elapsed time since last using AVX-512.

Q4OS 3.7 Centaurus, testing

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are entering the final phase of the Q4OS 3 Centaurus development, so it's now officially frozen. On this occasion we have released a brand new 32bit Q4OS Centaurus installation media designed for older computers, as well as 64bit media cumulative update. Users can now easily deploy the Q4OS 3.7 testing release, if they want to become early adopters or just help with the testing. Please download 64bit, as well as 32bit iso images on the dedicated Testing releases webpage.

Please note, there is also a Q4OS for Windows installer on the downloads page available for users who want to install Linux from within Windows as easy as an application, even without need of partitioning.

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Also: IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 133 ready for testing!

Enso OS Makes Xfce Elementary

Filed under
OS
Reviews

The most impressive aspect of Enso OS is the tweaked desktop that combines a somewhat modified Xfce environment with key elements from Elementary OS. The result could be a better alternative to Xubuntu, depending on your computing preferences.

For an early beta release of a relatively new Linux distribution, Enso OS has much going for it. This distro also has numerous areas where the developer must grow the infrastructure.

Enso OS is clearly a distro that bears watching over the next few releases.

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Voice boards run Linux on Cortex-A35 based RK3308

Filed under
Linux

Hangzhou Wild Chip Tech has launched two open-spec “MDK3308” dev kits with 6-mic arrays that extend a Linux-driven “Mcuzone MDK3308 Coreboard” module running a quad -A35 Rockchip RK3308.

Over on AliExpress, there’s a new Mcuzone MDK3308 Coreboard module featuring a Cortex-A35 based Rockchip RK3308 SoC. The Mcuzone MDK3308 Coreboard sells for $23 (256MB RAM) or $26 (512MB) with 256MB NAND flash and 8GB eMMC. The module is also available in two open-spec, sandwich-style evaluation kits starting at $35.

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Canonical's Linux Snap Store Adds 10 Distro-Specific Installation Pages For Every App

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Canonical's Snap Store -- a fairly distro-agnostic solution for easily installing a wide variety of apps -- is loaded up and ready to go in Linux distributions like Zorin OS and Ubuntu. It's also supported on dozens of others including Arch, Linux Mint, Manjaro and elementary OS, provided you install the Snapd service first. Now it looks like Canonical is striving to make the entire experience more user-friendly by serving up distro-specific landing pages for every single app in the Snap Store.

They look pretty slick, too.

For example, if you want to install something like Telegram, the Snap Store is ready to serve up a unique page, complete with an appropriately colored and logo-laden background explaining how to install both the required Snapd service and the app for the distro you're using. In the screenshot below, you'll notice commands to pull Snapd from the AUR (Arch User Repository), enable the service and then install Telegram Desktop.

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Initial Benchmarks Of Microsoft's WSL2 - Windows Subsystem For Linux 2 On Windows 10 Is A Mixed Bag

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Since the release of WSL2 as a Windows 10 Insider Preview update this week, we've been putting the new Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 under some benchmarks compared to WSL1 and bare metal Linux. While WSL2 has improved the I/O performance thanks to the new Hyper-V-based virtualization approach employed by WSL2, the performance has regressed in other areas for running Linux binaries on Windows 10. Here are our preliminary benchmark results.

In this comparison is a look at the Windows 10 WSL1 performance against that of the new WSL2 when using the same Windows 10 Insiders build as of this week that introduced the Windows Subsystem for Linux 2 support. The Ubuntu 18.04 LTS WSL instance was used for testing with its default packages. In addition to looking at the WSL1 vs. WSL2 performance of Ubuntu 18.04, Ubuntu 18.04.2 LTS itself was also tested bare metal on the same system for looking at the raw performance of Ubuntu on the Intel desktop being tested. Additionally, Clear Linux 29920 was also tested for what has largely become a "gold standard" for Linux performance in showing what Intel systems are capable of achieving performance-wise under Linux, so that is being used in this comparison as a reference point.

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Nebra AnyBeam: A Raspberry Pi powered home cinema projector you can fit in your pocket [Review]

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Before large screen televisions and 4K content became a thing, I used to enjoy watching films projected onto a white wall at home. I had a Canon projector hooked up to my PC with surround sound, and it was like having a personal cinema.

Technology has moved on quite some way since then, and you can now buy reasonable quality projectors for a fraction of the price. Case in point is Nebra AnyBeam, a Raspberry Pi powered pocket sized projector.

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Use Albert Launcher On Linux To Boost Your Productivity

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Albert is a productivity app inspired by Quicksilver, Alfred and other similar tools, that runs on Linux. Written in C++ / Qt5, this free and open source launcher uses a plugin-based architecture that makes it very flexible and powerful.

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12 Best Web Browsers for Ubuntu

Filed under
Web
Ubuntu

Selecting the best web browsers for Ubuntu largely depends on your personal needs, but usually, browsers are used for accessing/browsing websites.

In this article, we will look under the hood and highlight some of the best web browsers for Ubuntu.

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Games: Valve, SkateBIRD, Starbound, Rings of Saturn, Relic Hunters Legend, Vector 36, Skellboy, Volcanoids

Filed under
Gaming
  • Valve release a new stable Steam Client from all the recent Beta builds, nice fixes for Linux

    Valve have once again gathered all the new features and fixes from a bunch of recent Beta builds and pushed it out to everyone, this includes a bunch of nice fixes for Linux.

    Steam Remote Play is one of the biggest changes (previously in-home streaming), now it's "experimentally" available outside the home too with the renaming. You should now be able to stream games from one Steam client to another, wherever they are.

  • SkateBIRD has flown past the Kickstarter goal, Linux demo now available

    Get ready to explore a bird-sized skatepark, as SkateBIRD has not only flown right past the initial goal on Kickstarter, it also now has a Linux demo for you to flap your wings in excitement with

  • Starbound's massive 1.4 "Bounty Hunter" update is out now

    After a long wait, with this being the first update to Starbound since October last year. Seems like the wait may have been worth it though!

    The Bounty Hunter 1.4 update launched yesterday and it brings with it absolutely tons of news toys. The biggest new feature being the Bounty Hunting system, which has you take on procedurally-generated quests.

  • Hard sci-fi space game 'Rings of Saturn' is now doing an Early Access crowdfunding mix on itch

    Rings of Saturn, a hard sci-fi space simulation game made with the FOSS Godot Engine is now opening up Early Access builds on itch, with a slight difference.

    This isn't your usual Early Access model, as it's mixing in crowdfunding at the same time. Anyone who pays at least $9.99 on itch.io gets full access to the game and it has an always up to date demo to try first too. This is probably one of the nicest ways to do crowdfunding I've seen, something Fig also started doing recently with Vagrus.

  • Relic Hunters Legend to enter Alpha later this month, includes Linux support

    Relic Hunters Legend, the crowdfunded shoot and loot RPG from Rogue Snail is gearing up for the Alpha release this month.

    It sounds like it's going to be quite fun, an online co-op shoot and loot RPG from the creators of Chroma Squad, Dungeonland and Relic Hunters Zero. If you've not heard of it before, when it's eventually ready it will be going free to play so everyone can jump in, however they went to Kickstarter originally to get the funded need to actually make the game a reality.

  • Unique racing game 'Vector 36' adds online multiplayer in the latest update and a free weekend

    Vector 36 is a racing game that's quite unusual, as you're piloting a Skimmer across the surface of Mars.

  • Skellboy looks like a very sweet action-RPG where you swap body parts

    Skellboy, a recent discovery being developed by UmaikiGames and published by Fabraz (Slime-San, Planet Diver) looks like a very sweet action-RPG that I'm pretty excited about. Only appearing on Steam recently, it's going to be releasing with Linux support in "mid 2019" and they're very clear about the platforms too. On the official site, it's right there.

    Why am I exited about Skellboy? Well, not only does the graphical style look fantastic mixing in flat shapes with pixel-art and a 3D environment, the gameplay sounds highly amusing too. As you progress, you will be able to replace your bones with different body parts taken from others, which is a little weird but it does sound rather comical with the cute graphical style to it.

  • The latest Volcanoids update sounds amazing, lets you directly pilot your drillship

    Volcanoids, the steampunk survival game where your base of operations is a massive moving drill just had a massive update and it sounds like they're taking it in a fun direction.

    Released yesterday, the Travel Update has changed the way you explore. Previously, it felt like you had no real freedom to explore and as the developer said, the old map system was nothing more than a glorified fast-travel system. That's gone! Instead, you now get a Pilot Seat and this allows you to dig deep and explore directly. Also, while you're piloting your drillship you can actually use the massive drill to get resources on the map too making it even more handy.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Educational Operating Systems: What Are They? [Ed: Seems like an old article. Plagiarism? Some of the named distros no longer exist.]

    To start with our list, let’s talk about one of the more popular educational operating systems, EduBuntu. Does the name sound familiar, well this OS is a variation of the popular Windows alternative, Ubuntu. It’s built on the reliable Linux system and is supported by a strong Linux community.

    The software was built from kids aged 6 to 18. The system was built in collaboration with Educators around the world to ensure that the system serves its purpose as a great education source for kids. The system is built for teachers in mind as well as you don’t need a lot of technical knowledge to set it up in your computer lab or PC.

    Edubuntu comes packed with a number of useful education programs such as the KDE Edutainment application suite. What we love about this OS is that there is no need to reformat your PC if it’s already running Ubuntu. You can simply turn the Ubuntu software into Edubuntu through a series of steps.

  • 10 Best Free Human Resource Management Software

    It wasn’t too long ago that we published an article on the best open source accounting software for Linux. Today, we’re concentrating on software that’ll enable you to manage your Human Resources efficiently.

    Human resource management is difficult irrespective of whether you’re running a small or large business. Most HR tools require a subscription plan or one-time fee but there are a good number of alternatives that are available at little to no cost.

    As I usually do, here is my list of the best HR management software and they are all free.

  • Rosanne DiMesio is Conservancy's New Technical Bookkeeper

    We're excited to announce that we've hired Rosanne DiMesio to be our new Technical Bookkeeper. Rosanne is a longtime volunteer with the Wine project ( which was one of Conservancy's founding member projects) where she focuses her efforts on making things easier for users. She is also an Outreachy (also a Conservancy project) graduate who completed her internship working with Wine on improving their Applications Database (AppDB). Rosanne has done many different things during her career, including working as an English teacher and doing tech support for emergency response services. She brings her passion for free software and her care for new free software users to the role at Conservancy.

    "Rosanne has been an incredible force for good within the Wine project. I am delighted to know that my fellow Conservancy project members are going to get the benefit of her organization and insight; this is a huge win for Conservancy." says Jeremy White, a member of the leadership committee for the Wine project and CEO of CodeWeavers.

  • Doom Remake 4 shuts down due to cease and desist from Zenimax [Ed: GPL compliance]
  • Open hardware for musicians and music lovers: Headphone, amps, and more

    The world is full of great open source music players, but why stop at using open source just to play music? You can also use open source hardware to make music. All of the instruments described in this article are certified by the Open Source Hardware Association (OSHWA). That means you are free to build upon them, remix them, or do anything else with them.

  • Apple Joins Open Source Organization CNCF

    It’s well known that Apple not only uses but also contributes to many open source projects. You may not know but Siri, the virtual assistant of Apple, is powered by Apache Mesos.

    Apple heavily contributes to the open source projects they use. Unlike many other companies, Apple doesn’t like to talk much about it.

    The first time I saw Apple booth at any Open Source conference was at KubeCon in Seattle last year.

Debian: Outreachy, Patches and LTS Work by Raphaël Hertzog

Filed under
Debian

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Ruby 2.6 now available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7

    Red Hat Software Collections supply the latest, stable versions of development tools for Red Hat Enterprise Linux via two release trains per year. As part of the latest Software Collections 3.3 release, we are pleased to share that Ruby 2.6 is now generally available and supported on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

  • How Unicef Is Using Big Data To Close The Education Divide

    Given that challenges around education are only growing, Unicef and Red Hat hope to expand the platform over the coming months.

    Palau Montava says: “We have a pipeline of interested countries that want to be involved, so we anticipate the project will continue to grow. It’s an exciting time to be building these open source projects, and we think they will continue to change the world.

    The school mapping project forms part of the wider Magic Box platform that Unicef will continue to invest in. "Magic Box is an open source collaborative platform where partners like Red Hat share their data and expertise for public good. It’s this great place to harness real-time data generated by the private sector to give organizations like Unicef critical insights," concludes Palau Montava.

  • UPS delivers Agile plan for legacy application modernization

    The switch from Db2 and mainframe application code allowed UPS to access the data through open source Linux systems and host the data on open source Linux container orchestration systems, namely Red Hat OpenShift. This platform is also easier to update frequently and iteratively, as applications change through automated Jenkins CI/CD pipelines, Jani said.

  • Red Hat Takes Home a Trio of CODiE Awards

    It was a big awards night for Red Hat, recently, as three of our products won best in category business technology awards. The 2019 SIIA CODiE Awards have been distributed for over 30 years, now. They are the only peer-recognized program in the business and ed tech industries. In the words of the awards body, “Each CODiE Award win serves as incredible market validation for a product’s innovation, vision and overall industry impact.”

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More in Tux Machines

Stable kernels 5.1.11, 4.19.52, 4.14.127, 4.9.182, and 4.4.182

  • Linux 5.1.11
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.11 kernel. All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
  • Linux 4.19.52
  • Linux 4.14.127
  • Linux 4.9.182
  • Linux 4.4.182

Today in Techrights

Kernel: 412k+ Lines of Code From AMD and Toolchains Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference

  • AMD Posts 459 Linux Kernel Patches Providing Navi Support - 412k+ Lines Of Code
    As we've been expecting, AMD's open-source developers today posted their set of patches enabling Navi (10) support within their AMDGPU DRM kernel driver. Bringing up the Navi support in kernel-space are 459 patches amounting to more than four-hundred thousand lines of code, not counting the work done to LLVM as part of their shader compiler back-end or the yet-to-be-published OpenGL/Vulkan driver patches. This big code addition is necessary given all the changes to Navi10/RDNA but, yes, a lot of the changes are automated register headers. This initial open-source Navi GPU support includes the core driver enablement, display support using their new DCN2 "Display Core Next 2", GFX10 graphics and compute, SDMA5 system DMA, VCN2 "Video Core Next 2" multimedia encode/decode, and power management.
  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Toolchains Microconference Accepted into 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference
    We are pleased to announce that the Toolchains Microconference has been accepted into the 2019 Linux Plumbers Conference! The Linux kernel may be one of the most powerful systems around, but it takes a powerful toolchain to make that happen. The kernel takes advantage of any feature that the toolchains provide, and collaboration between the kernel and toolchain developers will make that much more seamless.

Server: Red Hat, CentOS 8, Linux On ARM Servers and IBM

  • Why Chefs Collaborate in the Kitchen
    In a large commercial kitchen, for example hotels or cafeterias, chefs collaborate to create the recipes and meals. Sure, there is more than enough work for one person, and tasks are divided into chopping, mixing, cleaning, garnishing; but the recipe is collaboratively created. Suppose one chef broke away and created his or her own recipe? How would the kitchen maintain standards, tastes and reputation? Developing software using open source principles follows a similar theory. [...] Red Hat is the second largest corporate contributor to the Linux kernel. This means Red Hat engineers and support staff are well versed and able to resolve customer issues involving the Linux kernel. Every application container includes part of the Linux distribution and relies on the Linux kernel, which is the center of the Linux Operating System.
  • CentOS 8 Status 17-June-2019
    Since the release of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 (on 07-May) we've been looking into the tools that we use to build CentOS Linux. We've chosen to use the Koji buildsystem for RPMs, paired with the Module Build Service for modules, delivered through a distribution called Mbox. Mbox allows us to run the Koji Hub (the central job orchestrator), and the Module Build Service in an instance of OKD that we maintain specifically for our buildsystem work. We have 2 instances of mbox; one for the primary architectures (x86_64, ppc64le, and aarch64), and one for the secondary architecture (armhfp). OKD lets us run those instances on the same hardware but in separate namespaces. The builder machines are separate from the OKD cluster, and connect back to the individual buildsystems that they're assigned to.
  • CentOS 8.0 Is Looking Like It's Still Some Weeks Out
    For those eager to see CentOS 8.0 as the community open-source rebuild of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0, progress is being made but it looks like the release is still some weeks out. There's been the Wiki page detailing the state of affairs for CentOS 8.0. New today is a blog post summing up the current status. Progress is being made both on building the traditional RHEL8 RPM packages as well as the newer modules/streams. Koji is being used to build the RPMs while the Module Build Service with Mbox is handling the modules.
  • NVIDIA Brings CUDA to Arm, Enabling New Path to Exascale Supercomputing
    International Supercomputing Conference -- NVIDIA today announced its support for Arm CPUs, providing the high performance computing industry a new path to build extremely energy-efficient, AI-enabled exascale supercomputers.
  • NVIDIA Delivering CUDA To Linux On Arm For HPC/Servers
    NVIDIA announced this morning for ISC 2019 that they are bringing CUDA to Arm beyond their work already for supporting GPU computing with lower-power Tegra SoCs.
  • Nvidia pushes ARM supercomputing
    Graphics chip maker Nvidia is best known for consumer computing, vying with AMD's Radeon line for framerates and eye candy. But the venerable giant hasn't ignored the rise of GPU-powered applications that have little or nothing to do with gaming. In the early 2000s, UNC researcher Mark Harris began work popularizing the term "GPGPU," referencing the use of Graphics Processing Units for non-graphics-related tasks. But most of us didn't really become aware of the non-graphics-related possibilities until GPU-powered bitcoin-mining code was released in 2010, and shortly thereafter, strange boxes packed nearly solid with high-end gaming cards started popping up everywhere.
  • At ISC: DDN Launches EXA5 for AI, Big Data, HPC Workloads
  • IBM Makes Takes Another Big Step To Hybrid Computing
    Today, IBM announced the ability to leverage its unique turnkey operating environment, IBM i, and its AIX UNIX operating systems on IBM Cloud. Both OSs debuted in the 1980s and have a long history with many IBM customers. In addition, IBM i remains one of the most automated, fully integrated, and low-maintenance operating environments. Extending both OSs to IBM Cloud will allow customers to expand their resources on-demand, to migrate to the cloud, to leverage the latest Power9 servers, and to leverage IBM’s extensive resources. IBM is rolling out the service first in North America for customers using IBM i or AIX on Power servers. In conjunction with the extension of the hybrid cloud platform, IBM also announced a program to validate business partners with Power Systems expertise.