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Saturday, 25 May 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Antergos Linux has been Discontinued

Filed under
News

Beginner-friendly Arch Linux based distribution Antergos has announced that the project is being discontinued.
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OSS: Molly de Blanc, ownCloud, Document Foundation, Red Hat Summit, Github Lockin and Contributor License Agreements

Filed under
OSS
  • Molly de Blanc: remuneration

    I am a leader in free software. As evidence for this claim, I like to point out that I once finagled an invitation to the Google OSCON luminaries dinner, and was once invited to a Facebook party for open source luminaries.

    In spite of my humor, I am a leader and have taken on leadership roles for a number of years. I was in charge of guests of honor (and then some) at Penguicon for several years at the start of my involvement in FOSS. I’m a delegate on the Debian Outreach team. My participation in Debian A-H is a leadership role as well. I’m president of the OSI Board of Directors. I’ve given keynote presentations on two continents, and talks on four. And that’s not even getting into my paid professional life. My compensated labor has been nearly exclusively for nonprofits.

    Listing my credentials in such concentration feels a bit distasteful, but sometimes I think it’s important. Right now, I want to convey that I know a thing or two about free/open source leadership. I’ve even given talks on that.

    Other than my full-time job, my leadership positions come without material renumeration — that is to say I don’t get paid for any of them — though I’ve accepted many a free meal and have had travel compensated on a number of occasions. I am not interested in getting paid for my leadership work, though I have come to believe that more leadership positions should be paid.

  • ownCloud Server 10.2 Release – Power to the Users

    ownCloud 10.2 introduces advanced sharing permissions, automatic synchronization in federated clouds and improved rights for users.

  • The Document Foundation and LibreOffice Online at OW2con 2019

    OW2con 2019 is the annual open source event bringing together the OW2 community, technology experts, software architects, IT project managers and decision-makers from around the world. The conference will be hosted by the Orange Gardens Innovation Center, Paris-Châtillon, on June 12-13, 2019.

  • Highlights Video of Red Hat Summit Keynotes

    If you missed Red Hat Summit, you should not despair: we’ve compiled a highlights video that captures the breadth and depth of what’s happening in the Red Hat OpenShift Ecosystem and beyond. From Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, to IBM CEO Ginni Rometty, the keynotes at the show demonstrated the widespread support and enthusiasm Red Hat has built across many technical domains. If you’ve got time, there will be dozens of videos from the show popping up on our YouTube Channel, keynotes or otherwise, over the coming weeks. For now, however, here’s the highlight reel featuring appearances from IBM, Delta, Exxon Mobil, Lockheed Martin, Volkswagen, Deutsche Bank, Microsoft, Kohl’s, OneMain, UPS, NVIDIA, HCA Healthcare, Boston Children’s Hospital, Optus, BP, Emirates NBD, and BMW. And there were a lot more customers speaking. Just take a look:

  • Top 100 Most Valuable GitHub Repositories [Ed: FOSSBytes promoting the dangerous perception if not pure propaganda that FOSS does not exist or does not count until or unless Microsoft owns and controls it]
  • Transfer Ssh Keys From Github To Server
  • What You Should Know About Contributor License Agreements In Open Source Projects

    An open source project comprises a community of software developers that agree to develop a common software-code base and make it freely available but subject to certain license requirements. The resulting software is typically vetted by multiple contributors to the open source project and may be further updated and improved based on their contributions. Open source software is prevalent in many popular software products, including Mozilla Firefox, Wordpress, GNU/Linux, Android mobile devices, Open Java Development Kit (OpenJDK), and even commercial products like Apple’s OS X.

systemd Clocks In At More Than 1.2 Million Lines

Filed under
Linux

Five years ago today was the story on Phoronix how the systemd source tree was approaching 550k lines so curiosity got the best of me to see how large is the systemd Git repository today. Well, now it's over 1.2 million lines.

After surpassing one million lines in 2017, when running GitStats on the systemd Git repository today it's coming in at 1,207,302 lines. Those 1.2 million lines are spread across 3,260 files and made over 40,057 commits from nearly 1,400 different authors.

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today's howtos

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HowTos

Huawei's alternative OS to Android set to roll out as early as fall

Filed under
OS

Reports have circulated about Huawei's efforts to build an alternative OS to Android for at least 3 years at this point. It's not known if the software will be a fork off of AOSP, which the company is free to use in any case under Google's open-source license. Huawei may also elect to use another base and implement an Android runtime as the Unix-derived BlackBerry 10 OS did. In any case, we're all still playing the guessing game.

Yu's statements — which were made to a quasi-public WeChat group this morning — followed a media briefing with the company's founder, Ren Zhengfei, on how it will handle its mounting challenges. Both executives have attempted to calm animosity coming from fervent fans and nationalists alike who have been ditching Apple products in favor of the company's, saying that patriots don't necessarily use Huawei products.

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Spyder 4.0 takes a big step closer with the release of Beta 2!

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Development
Software

It has been almost two months since I joined Quansight in April, to start working on Spyder maintenance and development. So far, it has been a very exciting and rewarding journey under the guidance of long time Spyder maintainer Carlos Córdoba. This is the first of a series of blog posts we will be writing to showcase updates on the development of Spyder, new planned features and news on the road to Spyder 4.0 and beyond.

First off, I would like to give a warm welcome to Edgar Margffoy, who recently joined Quansight and will be working with the Spyder team to take its development even further. Edgar has been a core Spyder developer for more than two years now, and we are very excited to have his (almost) full-time commitment to the project.

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Performance Impact of Serious CPU Defects

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
Security

Smartphone alternatives to Google and Apple

Filed under
OS
Android

This is a Linux Gnome 3 Debian “PureOS” based smartphone currently in development. It’s being designed with as much open-source audit-able software and hardware as possible. The intent with this device is to give you full control over your privacy. It’s not available yet, but the company behind it (Purism) also has some laptops and services that are very privacy focused.

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Top 20 Best Data Mining Software for Linux in 2019

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Data mining is the process of analyzing large amounts of data for obtaining useful information. It has incredibly diverse applications in fields of academic research and business. Researchers use data mining for inferring new solutions to computational research problems while corporations depend on it for gaining the upper hand in business revenues. Companies like Amazon utilize different data mining techniques for improving on their product recommendation engine while search giants like Google and Microsoft leverage them for effectively ranking their search engine results. Thanks to the increasing demand for Data Science in general, a plethora of robust data mining software for Linux has been shipped in the past decades. Stay with us to know more about the top 20 Linux data mining software.

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GNOME 3.34's Mutter Lowers Output Lag On X11 To Match Wayland Performance

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GNOME

Adding to the list of positive changes with GNOME 3.34 due out this September is lowering possible output lag when running GNOME's Mutter on X11/X.Org.

GNOME has experienced higher output lag on X.Org-based sessions rather than Wayland in some configurations. In particular, the higher output lag on X11 could be experienced when dragging around windows and seeing possible lag. Fortunately, as of today's latest Mutter 3.33 series development code, that lag has been addressed.

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Python Programming

Filed under
Development

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Google Joins The Evidence-Optional Assault On Huawei

    So we've noted several times now how the US efforts to blacklist Huawei from global telecom markets haven't much in the way of, oh, supporting evidence. The Trump administration and FCC have taken all manner of actions to try and blackball the company, from pressuring U.S. carriers to drop plans to sell Huawei phones to the FCC's decision to ban companies from using Huawei gear if they want to receive federal subsidies.

    The underlying justification for these moves has centered on the idea that Huawei operates as a surveillance extension of the Chinese government, something that still hasn't been proven despite a decade's worth of claims to this effect, and an eighteen month investigation by the White House.

    That's not to say the Chinese government is an innocent little daisy. Nor is it meant to suggest that it's impossible that Huawei spies on Americans. But the lack of any actual public evidence of spying remains troubling all the same, given that if the shoe were on the other foot, there'd be no shortage of face-fanning consternation on the part of American politicians and industry.

  • Nearly 20% of the 1000 Most Popular Docker Containers Have No Root Password

    Earlier this month, Talos released research showing that the Alpine Linux docker images were shipping with no (or nulled) root passwords. Alpine patched the docker files, and issued their response to the vulnerability here, noting that “an attacker who compromised your system via an unrelated security vulnerability, or a user with shell access, could elevate their privileges to root within the container.”

  • Let us subject MDS vulnerability to the glare of truth

    In the last three days, we’ve received a whole bunch of questions like Should I disable Hyper-Threading or not? and How Hyper-Threading disabling can impact performance? So, here we are with some important information about the point.

    But what is the problem? CPU has two execution threads per physical core. Both threads share the same resources inside the CPU. It means sibling cores can see the same data as the primary core can.

  • Is Linux Safer Than Windows and macOS?

    Cybersecurity is extremely important – now more than ever. If you start to do research, however, you’ll find a debate going on about which operating system is the safest. These days, more IT professionals and companies are preaching the benefits of Linux systems. There are definitely some security advantages to the platform. But like everything in the computer world, so much comes down to user training. Even if you have a very secure platform, a virus can still be a problem. So let’s take a look at Linux and some of the advanced security measures you need to take.

Mesa 19.0.5 and Mesa 19.1 RC3

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • mesa 19.0.5
    Hi List,
    
    I'd like to announce the availability of mesa 19.0.5. Just as a reminder the
    plan is to have one more release of the 19.0 series in two weeks, but that is
    subject to change base on the 19.1 release progress.
    
    Things have slowed back down from the last release, which is good for this late
    in the series. No one area has received too much work, with a little bit
    sprinkled in here and there in both core code and drivers.
    
    Dylan
    
    Shortlog
    ========
    
    Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (2):
          nir: Fix nir_opt_idiv_const when negatives are involved
          nir: Fix clone of nir_variable state slots
    
    Charmaine Lee (2):
          st/mesa: purge framebuffers with current context after unbinding winsys buffers
          mesa: unreference current winsys buffers when unbinding winsys buffers
    
    Dylan Baker (5):
          docs: Add SHA256 sums for mesa 19.0.4
          cherry-ignore: add patches for panfrost
          cherry-ignore: Add more 19.1 patches
          bump version to 19.0.5
          docs: Add release notes for 19.0.5
    
    Eric Engestrom (1):
          meson: expose glapi through osmesa
    
    Gert Wollny (2):
          softpipe/buffer: load only as many components as the the buffer resource type provides
          Revert "softpipe/buffer: load only as many components as the the buffer resource type provides"
    
    Ian Romanick (1):
          Revert "nir: add late opt to turn inot/b2f combos back to bcsel"
    
    Jason Ekstrand (3):
          intel/fs/ra: Only add dest interference to sources that exist
          intel/fs/ra: Stop adding RA interference to too many SENDS nodes
          anv: Only consider minSampleShading when sampleShadingEnable is set
    
    Józef Kucia (1):
          radv: clear vertex bindings while resetting command buffer
    
    Kenneth Graunke (1):
          i965: Fix memory leaks in brw_upload_cs_work_groups_surface().
    
    Leo Liu (1):
          winsys/amdgpu: add VCN JPEG to no user fence group
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (1):
          anv: Use corresponding type from the vector allocation
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          st/mesa: fix 2 crashes in st_tgsi_lower_yuv
    
    Nanley Chery (1):
          anv: Fix some depth buffer sampling cases on ICL+
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (1):
          radv: add a workaround for Monster Hunter World and LLVM 7&8
    
    
  • Mesa 19.0.5 Released As The Series Approaches The End

    Mesa 19.0.5 is now available as what is expected to be the second to the last release in the Mesa 19.0 series.

    Mesa 19.0.5 has just around two dozen fixes, mostly all minor items. There are random fixes throughout ranging from NIR and other core components to the Intel ANV / i96t5 / Radeon RADV drivers.

  • mesa 19.1.0-rc3
    Hello, list.
    
    The third release candidate for Mesa 19.1.0 is now available.
    
    Remind that right now there are two bugs blocking the final release:
    
    #110302 - [bisected][regression] piglit egl-create-pbuffer-surface and egl-gl-colorspace regressions
    #110357 - [REGRESSION] [BISECTED] [OpenGL CTS] cts-runner --type=gl46 fails in new attempted "41" configuration
    
    
    Caio Marcelo de Oliveira Filho (2):
          nir: Fix nir_opt_idiv_const when negatives are involved
          nir: Fix clone of nir_variable state slots
    
    Charmaine Lee (2):
          st/mesa: purge framebuffers with current context after unbinding winsys buffers
          mesa: unreference current winsys buffers when unbinding winsys buffers
    
    Dave Airlie (1):
          glsl: init packed in more constructors.
    
    Eric Engestrom (2):
          util/os_file: always use the 'grow' mechanism
          meson: expose glapi through osmesa
    
    Gert Wollny (1):
          Revert "softpipe/buffer: load only as many components as the the buffer resource type provides"
    
    Ian Romanick (1):
          Revert "nir: add late opt to turn inot/b2f combos back to bcsel"
    
    Jason Ekstrand (5):
          intel/fs/ra: Only add dest interference to sources that exist
          intel/fs/ra: Stop adding RA interference to too many SENDS nodes
          anv: Emulate texture swizzle in the shader when needed
          anv: Stop forcing bindless for images
          anv: Only consider minSampleShading when sampleShadingEnable is set
    
    Juan A. Suarez Romero (2):
          cherry-ignore: radeonsi: update buffer descriptors in all contexts after buffer invalidation
          Update version to 19.1.0-rc3
    
    Lionel Landwerlin (4):
          nir: fix lower_non_uniform_access pass
          vulkan/overlay-layer: fix cast errors
          vulkan/overlay: fix truncating error on 32bit platforms
          nir: lower_non_uniform_access: iterate over instructions safely
    
    Marek Olšák (1):
          radeonsi: remove old_va parameter from si_rebind_buffer by remembering offsets
    
    Nanley Chery (1):
          anv: Fix some depth buffer sampling cases on ICL+
    
    Neha Bhende (1):
          draw: fix memory leak introduced 7720ce32a
    
    Samuel Pitoiset (1):
          radv: add a workaround for Monster Hunter World and LLVM 7&8
    
  • Mesa 19.1-RC3 Brings NIR, Vulkan Driver Fixes & Other Changes

    If all goes well the Mesa 19.1 release will be happening in the next week or two. But for those wanting to help test this open-source graphics driver stack, Mesa 19.1-RC3 was released today as the newest weekly release candidate.

    Mesa 19.1-RC3 isn't particularly exciting but brings a handful of changes throughout. Most of the changes this week pertain to fix-ups with the NIR code, the Intel ANV and Radeon RADV Vulkan drivers, a few core Mesa/GLSL changes, a lone RadeonSI code change, and some other minor work. The changes aren't too noticeable for end-users but at least on the RADV front is a workaround for the Monster Hunter World game when using LLVM 7/8 AMDGPU code.

Manjaro Vs Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Everyone who is associated with technology and core programming must have heard of names like Ubuntu, Arch Linux, Debian, and Mint. While many of you have years of experience working on various kernels, switching platforms and developing software; there’s a fair amount of individuals, who don’t have enough knowledge regarding the smaller and currently emerging distributions. One such distro of Linux is Manjaro.

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Kali Linux 2019.2 Release

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

Welcome to our second release of 2019, Kali Linux 2019.2, which is available for immediate download. This release brings our kernel up to version 4.19.28, fixes numerous bugs, includes many updated packages, and most excitingly, features a new release of Kali Linux NetHunter!

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Mozilla: Firefox Privacy Features and the Cost of Proprietary Software for Communication

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Save and update passwords in Private Browsing with Firefox

    Private browsing was invented 14 years ago, making it possible for users to close a browser window and erase traces of their online activity from their computers. Since then, we’ve bundled in various levels of tracking protection and privacy control. While that’s great, some basic browser functionality pieces were missing from the Private Browsing Mode experience, namely giving you the option to save logins and passwords and giving you the power to choose which extensions you wanted enabled.

  • No-Judgement Digital Definitions: What is Cryptocurrency?

    Cryptocurrency, cryptomining. We hear these terms thrown around a lot these days. It’s a new way to invest. It’s a new way to pay. It’s a new way to be deeply confused. To many of us, crypto-things sound like technobabble from sci fi movie. If you’re used to thinking about money as something that is issued by your government, kept in a bank and then traded for goods and services, then wrapping your head around cryptocurrency might be a bit of work, but we can do it!

  • Let Firefox help you block cryptominers from your computer

    Is your computer fan spinning up for no apparent reason? Your electricity bill inexplicably high? Your laptop battery draining much faster than usual? It may not be all the Netflix you’re binging or a computer virus. Cryptocurrency miners may be using your computer’s resources to generate cryptocurrency without your consent. We know it sounds like something out of a video game or one of those movies that barely gets technology right, but as much as cryptomining may sound like fiction, the impact on your life can be very real.

  • How to block fingerprinting with Firefox

    If you wonder why you keep seeing the same ad, over and over, the answer could be fingerprinting.

    Fingerprinting is a type of online tracking that’s different from cookies or ordinary trackers. This digital fingerprint is created when a company makes a unique profile of your computer, software, add-ons, and even preferences. Your settings like the screen you use, the fonts installed on your computer, and even your choice of a web browser can all be used to create a fingerprint.

  • Firefox 67: Dark Mode CSS, WebRender, and more

    Firefox 67 is available today, bringing a faster and better JavaScript debugger, support for CSS prefers-color-scheme media queries, and the initial debut of WebRender in stable Firefox.

  • The Cost of Fragmented Communication

    Mozilla recently announced that we are planning to de-commission irc.mozilla.org in favour of a yet to be determined solution. As a long time user and supporter of IRC, this decision causes me some melancholy, but I 100% believe that it is the right call. Moreover, having had an inside glimpse at the process to replace it, I’m supremely confident whatever is chosen will be the best option for Mozilla’s needs.

    I’m not here to explain why deprecating IRC is a good idea. Other people have already done so much more eloquently than I ever could have. I’m also not here to push for a specific replacement. Arguing over chat applications is like arguing over editors or version control. Yes, there are real and important differences from one application to the next, but if there’s one thing we’re spoiled for in 2019 it’s chat applications. Besides, so much time has been spent thinking about the requirements, there’s little anyone could say on the matter that hasn’t already been considered for hours.

Firefox 67.0 Released

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Version 67.0, first offered to Release channel users on May 21, 2019
  • Latest Firefox Release is Faster than Ever

    With the introduction of the new Firefox Quantum browser in 2017 we changed the look, feel, and performance of our core product. Since then we have launched new products to complement your experience when you’re using Firefox and serve you beyond the browser. This includes Facebook Container, Firefox Monitor and Firefox Send. Collectively, they work to protect your privacy and keep you safe so you can do the things you love online with ease and peace of mind. We’ve been delivering on that promise to you for more than twenty years by putting your security and privacy first in the building of products that are open and accessible to all.

    Today’s new Firefox release continues to bring fast and private together right at the crossroads of performance and security. It includes improvements that continue to keep Firefox fast while giving you more control and assurance through new features that your personal information is safe while you’re online with us.

  • Firefox 67.0 Released, ownCloud Announces New Server Version 10.2, Google Launches "Glass Enterprise Edition 2" Headset, Ubuntu Expands Its Kernel Uploader Team and Kenna Security Reports Almost 20% of Popular Docker Containers Have No Root Password

    Firefox 67.0 was released today. From the Mozilla blog: "Today's new Firefox release continues to bring fast and private together right at the crossroads of performance and security. It includes improvements that continue to keep Firefox fast while giving you more control and assurance through new features that your personal information is safe while you're online with us." You can download it from here, and see the release notes for details.

  • Firefox 67.0 Released, Upgrading to Dav1d AV1 Decoder

    Mozilla Firefox 67.0 was released today with performance improvements and some new features.

  • Firefox 67.0 Released With Better Performance, Switches To Dav1d AV1 Decoder

    Mozilla set sail Firefox 67.0 this morning as the newest version of this web browser and the update is heavy on the feature front.

    Firefox 67.0 brings a number of performance improvements, the ability to block known cryptominers/fingerprinters, better keyboard accessibility, usability/security enhancements to Private Browsing, various ease-of-use improvements, switching to DAV1D as its AV1 video decoder, FIDO U2F API support, security fixes, and various JavaScript API additions.

  • Firefox 67 released

    The Mozilla blog takes a look at the Firefox 67 release.

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More in Tux Machines

Rob Szumski’s Keynote and Abby Kearns Interview at CloudNativeCon & KubeCon

GNOME: Theming, Mutter and Sprint 1

  • App Devs Ask Linux Distros to “Stop Theming Our Apps”
    A group of independent Linux app developers have written an open letter to ask wider GNOME community to ask: “stop theming our apps”. The letter is addressed to the maintainers of Linux distributions who elect to ship custom GTK and icons themes by default in lieu of upstream defaults. By publicising the issues they feel stem from the practice of “theming” it’s hoped that distros and developers might work together to create a “healthier GNOME third party app ecosystem”.
  • A Group of Independent Linux App Developers Has Asked Wider GNOME Community To 'Stop Theming' Its Apps
  • GNOME's Mutter Makes Another Step Towards X11-Less, Starting XWayland On-Demand
    GNOME 3.34 feature development continues at full-speed with a lot of interesting activity this cycle particularly on the Mutter front. On top of the performance/lag/stuttering improvements, today Mutter saw the merging of the "X11 excision" preparation patches. The Mutter patches by longtime GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho around preparing for X11 excision were merged minutes ago.
  • Georges Basile Stavracas Neto: New Background panel, Calendar search engine, GTK4 shortcut engine (Sprint 1)
    GNOME To Do is full GTK4 these days. Which means it’s both a testbed for new GTK4 features, and also a way to give feedback as an app developer for the GTK team. Unfortunately, it also means To Do is blocked on various areas where GTK4 is lacking. One of these areas is keyboard shortcut. Last year, Benjamin wrote a major revamp for keyboard shortcuts. As part of this cycle, I decided to rebase and finish it; and also make To Do use the new API. Unfortunately, I failed to achieve what I set myself to. Turns out, adding a shortcuts engine to GTK4 is more involving and requires way more context than I had when trying to get it up to speed. I failed to predict that one week would have not been enough to finish it all. However, that does not mean all the efforts were wasted! The rebasing of the shortcuts engine was a non-trivial task successfully completed (see gtk!842), and I also fixed a few bugs while working on it. I also got a working prototype of GNOME To Do with the new APIs, and confirmed that it’s well suited — at least for a simpler application such as To Do. In retrospect, I believe I should have been more realistic (and perhaps slightly pessimistic) about the length and requirements of this task.

Programming: SVE2, Graphical Interface, Guile, Python and More

  • Arm SVE2 Support Aligning For GCC 10, LLVM Clang 9.0
    Given the significant performance benefits to Arm's Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2), they are working on ensuring the open-source Linux compiler toolchains support these new CPU instructions ahead of SoCs shipping that support this big addition. Arm announced Scalable Vector Extension 2 (SVE2) recently as their latest advancement around SIMD programming and increasing data-level parallelism in programs. SVE2 is designed to ultimately deliver better SIMD performance than their long-available Neon extensions and to scale the performance with vector length increases as well as enabling auto-vectorization techniques. More details in this post on SVE2.
  • Intake: Discovering and Exploring Data in a Graphical Interface
    Do you have data that you’d like people to be able to explore on their own? Are you always passing around snippets of code to load specific data files? These are problems that people encounter all the time when working in groups and using the same datasources or when trying to distribute data to the public. Some users are comfortable interacting with data entirely programatically, but often it is helpful to use a GUI (Graphical User Interface) instead. With that in mind we have reimplemented the Intake GUI so that in addition to working in a jupyter notebook, it can be served as a web application next to your data, or at any endpoint.
  • lightening run-time code generation
    The upcoming Guile 3 release will have just-in-time native code generation. Finally, amirite? There's lots that I'd like to share about that and I need to start somewhere, so this article is about one piece of it: Lightening, a library to generate machine code.
  • Python Language Creator: “Male Attitude” Is Hurting The Programming Space
    Guido van Rossum is a famous name in the programming world. He is the creator of the Python programming language which was developed back in 1989. It is only since the last few years when this general-purpose programming language started gaining popularity. The number of Python users has increased significantly and it was not only named as the best programming language by IEEE but also the most asked-about language on Stack Overflow, overthrowing JavaScript — the all-time winner for decades.
  • Avant-IDLE: an experiment

Dear Ubuntu: Please Stop Packaging Epiphany If You Won’t Do It Properly

When users try Epiphany on Ubuntu, they receive a sub-par, broken browser. If you’re not willing to do this right, please just remove Epiphany from your repositories. We’d all be happier this way. You are the most popular distributor of Epiphany by far, and your poor packaging is making the browser look bad. Read more