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today's howtos

Linux Tests Of The QNINE M.2 NVMe SSD Enclosure To USB-C Adapter

In the past few months a number of M.2 NVMe SSD to USB adapters have been appearing on the market. Curious about the performance potential on Linux of an NVMe SSD drive attached to a USB 3.1 connection, I recently picked up a QNINE NVMe solid-state drive enclosure for benchmarking. The QNINE NVMe SSD enclosure is an M.2 NVMe to USB-C/USB-3.1 adapter that retails for about $40 USD from the likes of Amazon. Only Windows and macOS support is mentioned, but the drive was detected just fine and working under Linux. This QNINE adapter is just one of many M.2 NVMe to USB-C adapters on the market and most in the $40~60 USD price range. Read more

Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available

The new software release, Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available! This time, the name for Sailfish OS 3.0.2 update was inspired by one of our sailor’s favorite locations: Oulanka National Park. Oulanka is a national park in Lapland and Northern Ostrobothnia regions of Finland, covering 270 km². This park is known in Finland by adventurers due to it is famous trekking route, Karhunkierros, a four day – eighty kilometer route – located in Oulanka and accessible all year round. Oulanka was the first of the two Finnish national parks to become part of World Wide Fund for Nature’s PAN Parks. Read more

Games: Google Stadia, Forge and Fight, Relic Hunters Legend, Port Valley

  • Google Stadia Gaming Platform Needs Min 25Mb/s Internet Speed
    Google has released the specifications of its upcoming game streaming platform known as Google Stadia. The game streaming platform from the tech giant will use custom made processor and an ultra-fast graphics card in its forthcoming console. While the CPU will be a 2.7GHz x86 custom-made chip with hyper-threading and 9.5 MB L2+L2 cache, AMD will handle the graphical duties with a 10.7 Teraflops GPU with 56 compute units and HMB2 memory. Stadia machine will have 16GB of RAM along with 484GB/s of high transfer speed. Additionally, an SSD will be used for maximum performance to increase the load-time.
  • Forge and Fight might be the most hilarious prototype I've played recently
    Always keen to see what new types of experiences developers are looking to offer, I often try out game prototypes. Forge and Fight is one where you make your own weapon and it's pretty amusing. Since it's a prototype, it's obviously quite basic. However the promise with this one is very clear! Pick a handle and then basically stick anything on it and swing it around at your enemies! How about a fancy looking sword? Sure you could do that—or you could swing around multiple Scythes attached by a chain link with a flamethrower, a couple of spike balls and a boxing glove because why the hell not.
  • The shoot and loot RPG 'Relic Hunters Legend' is looking good in the latest trailer
    ...it's coming to Linux and certainly still seems to be that way as the trailer even has the Linux "tux" logo included and the current FAQ clearly mentions Linux as a platform...
  • Port Valley, a "not so classic" point & click adventure now has a Linux demo
    From developer WrongPixel, Port Valley is an in development point & click adventure that's "not so" classic apparently. Honestly, I had never heard of this before or at least I don't remember hearing about it at all. Turns out a few days ago it gained a Linux demo and it does seem to work quite nicely. Seems like a very interesting point and click game, one the developer said is only aiming to borrow some mechanics from the past while showing the genre "still has a lot to say".

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • How CYBG is increasingly running 'as-a-service' with Red Hat

    British banking group CYBG, which encompasses Clydesdale Bank, Yorkshire Bank, B, and Virgin Money, has turned to Red Hat to unify its digital banking systems under a single platform, which the organisation hopes will help it better roll out changes across brands.

    Speaking with Computerworld UK, Fraser Ingram, the interim COO at CYBG explained how the open source Linux vendor underpins the bank's modern platform-as-a-service (PaaS) approach to delivering consistent digital experiences across its brands, all starting with its digital-only brand B.

  • A Self-Hosted Global Load Balancer for OpenShift

    This is the fifth installment on a series of blog posts related to deploying OpenShift in multi-cluster configurations.

    In the first two posts (part 1 and part 2), we explored how to create a network tunnel between multiple clusters.

    In the third post, it was demonstrated how to deploy Istio multicluster across multiple clusters and how to deploy the popular bookinfo application in this multiple cluster-spanning mesh.

    In the fourth installment, we showed further improvement by adding Federation V2 to the mix to help propagate federated resources across multiple clusters.

    In each of the previous implementations, we ignored how to channel traffic between each of the federated clusters.

    In a previously published article, it was described how to build a global load balancer to balance traffic across multiple OpenShift clusters.

    In this post, we will implement that architecture, building upon the concepts from the last four posts. We will also see how it is possible to host the global load balancer in the federated clusters themselves, achieving a self-hosted global load balancer.

  • Fedora Security Lab

    The Fedora Security Lab was released as part of the Fedora 30 Candidate Beta cycle.

  • Fedora 29 : Testing the dnf python module.
  • FAS username search in Fedora Happiness Packets

Linux Foundation: CI/CD Gets Governance and Standardization, Microsoft-Connected CommunityBridge, and DataPractices.Org

Filed under
Linux
Server
  • CI/CD Gets Governance and Standardization

    Kubernetes, microservices and the advent of cloud native deployments have created a Renaissance-era in computing. As developers write and deploy code as part of continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) production processes, an explosion of tools has emerged for CI/CD processes, often targeted for cloud native deployments.

  • CommunityBridge by the Linux Foundation: Digging In

    As such, the Linux Foundation has produced an environment across their projects and events in which independent discussion and development can happen. Is it perfect, no, but nothing is. What I do know is that we wouldn’t be where we are today with open source if the Linux Foundation hadn’t helped facilitate a lot of this.

    As such, CommunityBridge seems like an entirely logical next step. The only way we can grow to serve the broader ecosystem is to not just help the big-ticket projects like Kubernetes, but also the long-tail of projects too. A clear, featureful platform will pay dividends here in the broader success of open source.

    Now, this isn’t going to be a walk in the park. For CommunityBridge to succeed, it needs to be informed and guided by the broader community. The Linux Foundation can’t possibly have all the answers, none of us do. They are have been open in expressing their receptiveness to feedback, and it is important that projects provide it. This will ensure that CommunityBridge shapes the most critical needs in the open source ecosystem.

  • DataPractices.Org Becomes a Linux Foundation Project

    “By joining forces with the Linux Foundation, we are inviting the broader community to help datapractices.org evolve,” said Brett Hurt, co-founder and CEO of data.world. “This is the collective knowledge of a group of experts that can, and should, continue to be refined by those closest to the effective, modern, and ethical use of data.”

Xfce Screensaver 0.1.4 Released and the GNOME Metered Data Survey

Filed under
GNU
Linux
GNOME
  • Xfce Screensaver 0.1.4 Released

    Featuring numerous performance improvements and an improved low-power resource footprint, Xfce Screensaver 0.1.4 continues to improve screen locking on Xfce.

  • Tether Often? Take the GNOME Metered Data Survey

    In some parts of the world (even here in Blighty) many internet packages come with a usage limit, traffic shaping or “data cap”. For many, myself included these restrictions are part and parcel of going online.

    I often tether my Ubuntu laptop to my (data-capped) mobile internet, mostly when if i’m working from a cafe with a dodgy or insecure network.

    Using a computer with a data limit certainly affects the way you use it, the websites you access (and how long they stay open), the apps you run (or have running in the background), and so on.

    Overage charges can be costly. Traffic slowdowns often inopportune. Nixed connections the absolute worst.

Firefox 66 Is Now Available for Ubuntu 18.10, 18.04 LTS, and 16.04 LTS Users

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

Released earlier this week, the Mozilla Firefox 66 web browser has landed in Ubuntu's repositories with a bunch of great improvements, such as the hidden system title bar that respects the GNOME guidelines. Not only Firefox will now look good, but you won't have two title bars, nor you'll have to use extensions to get rid of one.

Apart from the looks for GNOME users, which is now the default desktop environment on Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), Mozilla Firefox 66 comes with various under the hood improvements, such as freezeless downloading of files and faster web content loading by reducing the crash rates and increasing the processes from 4 to 8.

Read more

A Quick Look At The Firefox 66.0 vs. Chrome 73.0 Performance Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the recent releases of Chrome 73 and Firefox 66, here are some fresh tests of these latest browsers on Linux under a variety of popular browser benchmarks.

This initial round of testing was done on the latest of Intel's Clear Linux with a Core i9 9900K and Radeon RX Vega 56 graphics card. Originally the intent was to look at the performance of Clear Linux's default Firefox build compared to the upstream Firefox x86_64 Linux binary to see how the performance differed or if any Clear optimizations paid off there. In this particular instance, Clear Linux's Firefox build and that of the upstream/generic Firefox Linux binary basically came down to the same. As a follow-up though will be tests of Firefox/Chrome running on Clear Linux against the likes of Ubuntu to see if the underlying operating system changes yield any performance difference.

Read more

Gaming: DeviluitionX, Walmart, Stadia, Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, Baba Is You, Epic, We. The Revolution and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • DeviluitionX: Enjoying The 23 Year Old Diablo Game Atop An Open-Source Engine

    The latest open-source game engine project working to re-implement a legendary commercial game is DeviluitionX. This new effort is an open-source re-implementation of Blizzard's Diablo game from 1996 while now working on Linux and other operating systems nicely.

    The DeviluitionX effort has already reached "a fully playable state on Linux / macOS / Windows, with only minor issues remaining." DeviluitionX does require the game assets from the official Diablo release, which is now available easily from GOG.com following the recent Diablo release on that DRM-free platform.

  • Walmart Is Planning Its Own Gaming Streaming Service: Report

    Google recently entered the $140 billion gaming industry by launching Stadia, a cloud-gaming service. The company garnered a lot of attention from tech enthusiasts as it showcased the service that supports 4K resolutions and gaming at 60fps.

  • Exclusive: Walmart is Talking to Developers and Publishers About a Potential Streaming Service

    Google made headlines this week when it announced its arrival into the video game space with a new streaming venture called Stadia. But according to sources, another major corporation is investigating the video game streaming business too, and it's none other than Walmart.

    Multiple sources familiar with Walmart's plans, who wish to remain anonymous, confirmed to USG that the retail giant is exploring its own platform to enter in the now-competitive video game streaming race. No other details were revealed other than it will be a streaming service for video games, and that Walmart has been speaking with developers and publishers since earlier this year and throughout this year's Game Developers Conference.

  • Google Has Killed 147 Projects, Will Stadia Join Them?
  • In Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, music is your weapon and it's coming to Linux

    One Kickstarter I completely missed is Deathbulge: Battle of the Bands, a musical themed quirky RPG where music is your weapon. The campaign is over and it managed to smash the funding goal, with Linux noted as a release platform.

    Based on the Deathbulge comic from Dan Martin (who is involved too of course in this), over two thousand backers pledged their support to give the developers just under sixty thousand dollars to bring the game to life. It smashed some stretch goals, including bringing in guest artists and having more character classes.

  • Baba Is You is an excellent rule-breaking puzzle game, some thoughts

    Baba Is You, a recent puzzle game release from Hempuli Oy offers a pretty different take on the genre and I have some thoughts. Note: My key was provided by the developer directly. Also, likely spoilers contained within.

    Baba is honestly like no other puzzle game I can think of, one where you are literally changing the rules of the game to progress through each level and it's a magical experience. Truthfully, I thought it would be quite a simple game considering the mechanics but I've been massively surprised overall.

  • Epic Games new 'Epic Online Services' will support Linux and it's free for developers to use

    Building upon the work they've done with Fortnite, it's going to offer support for: Parties, an in-game Overlay, Matchmaking, Player reports, Achievements, leaderboards, stats and so on. Don't get too excited though, as right now it's only offering Game analytics (telemetry about players) and a support ticket system with everything else "Coming soon".

  • We. The Revolution sounds pretty awesome and it's out now

    Set in the blood-soaked and paranoid world of the French Revolution, We. The Revolution from Polyslash is officially out with Linux support.

    As much as I wanted to have some thoughts on it, given how incredibly interesting it sounds, I can't. GOG's Linux team sent over a copy but I'm not quite sure what's going on with the GOG release at this point. It advertises Linux support yet it has no Linux download even though supposed to have one, so there's some kind of delay on GOG's side with it. Update: Now actually live on GOG too.

  • 2D indie platformer fighter 'Super Powered Battle Friends' looks interesting in the new trailer

    One thing we don't have enough of on Linux, is good platform fighting games and Super Powered Battle Friends is looking pretty good.

    Last time I wrote about it, there wasn't an official trailer to properly show it off.

  • CodeWeavers have released CrossOver 18.5 pulling in Wine 4.0 and FAudio

    For those who want to help with Wine development without contributing code, CodeWeavers host the Wine project and contribute to its development along with their own CrossOver product.

Programming: Qt, Python, Rust, C++, C and Git

Filed under
Development
  • Effective HMI interaction and safety attention monitoring using eye tracking technology: DeepGlance Quick

    Interacting effectively with increasingly widespread and advanced systems is one of the most important challenges of our time. Most modern HMIs are based on mouse, keyboard or touch screen and allow controlling even very complex devices in a simple and intuitive way. However, in certain contexts, the user may be unable to have direct contact with a device, in this case, we are talking about hands-free interactions and often voice commands are used to interact. But controlling a system by voice, however natural, is not effective for all types of operations and in all environments. In fact, every technology has its peculiarities, that’s why the HMI design and the UX are the subject of continuous research and aim to offer increasingly effective and natural interaction methods, also thanks to the combined use of more complementary technologies between them.

  • Seven ways to improve your team’s Python

    If you’re a manager, then you’re always trying to find ways that’ll help your team do more in less time. That’s why you use Python — because it makes your developers more productive. They can spend more time creating new features, and less time debugging or maintaining existing code. It’s no surprise that so many companies are moving to Python.

    After you’ve moved to Python, you can still make your team more effective. That is, your organization can become more productive, combining technology and culture to help your developers improve. In such a scenario, everyone wins: Your company becomes more efficient and effective, and your team members are more satisfied.

  • Rust All Hands 2019: Array iterators, Rayon, and more

    A few weeks ago, I had the pleasure of attending the second annual Rust All Hands meeting, hosted by Mozilla at their Berlin office. The attendees were a mix of volunteers and corporate employees covering the full range of Rust development, including the compiler, language, libraries, docs, tools, operations, and community. Although I’m sure there will be an official summary of the meeting (like last year’s), in this article, I’ll cover a few things I was directly involved in. First, I’ll look at a feature many developers have wanted for a long time…

  • GCC 9 libstdc++ Lands The C++17 Parallel Algorithms Implementation From Intel

    While the release of GCC 9 (v9.1) is just a few weeks ago, a late addition to this annual compiler collection update is its C++ standard library now having a C++17 parallel algorithms implementation thanks to Intel developers.

    Intel has been working on contributing their C++17 parallel algorithms library code to both GCC and also to the LLVM project. Intel has been working on this Parallel STL implementation the past few years with a focus on contributing the support to the libc++ and libstdc++ C++ standard libraries. The Parallel STL is a portable implementation of threaded/vectorized execution of standard C++ algorithms, which can equate to a performance win on today's multi-core systems.

  • Linux C Programming Tutorial Part 14 - Bitwise operators practical examples
  • Tutorial: Introduction to Git and Github

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

How to save time with TiDB

Filed under
OSS

Last November, I wrote about key differences between MySQL and TiDB, an open source-compatible, cloud-based database engine, from the perspective of scaling both solutions in the cloud. In this follow-up article, I'll dive deeper into the ways TiDB streamlines and simplifies administration.

If you come from a MySQL background, you may be used to doing a lot of manual tasks that are either not required or much simpler with TiDB.

The inspiration for TiDB came from the founders managing sharded MySQL at scale at some of China's largest internet companies. Since requirements for operating a large system at scale are a key concern, I'll look at some typical MySQL database administrator (DBA) tasks and how they translate to TiDB.

Read more

Security: Updates, Windows, Medtronic and FUD

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Norwegian firm attack likely through Microsoft Active Directory: claim

    The Windows network at the Norwegian aluminium maker Norsk Hydro was probably infiltrated by attackers who planted the LockerGoga ransomware using something like scheduled tasks or services in Microsoft's Active Directory, a British security expert says.

  • Microsoft starts notifying Windows 7 users about end of support

    Microsoft’s end of support date means that Windows 7 users will no longer receive security updates, and the company wants consumers to upgrade to Windows 10 PCs instead. While the notification doesn’t mention Windows 10, Microsoft links to a new Windows 7 site that encourages consumers to upgrade their PCs.

  • Critical flaw lets [attackers] control lifesaving devices implanted inside patients

    The federal government on Thursday warned of a serious flaw in Medtronic cardio defibrillators that allows attackers to use radio communications to surreptitiously take full control of the lifesaving devices after they are implanted in a patient.

    Defibrillators are small, surgically implanted devices that deliver electrical shocks to treat potentially fatal irregular heart rhythms. In recent decades, doctors have increasingly used radios to monitor and adjust the devices once they're implanted rather than using older, costlier, and more invasive means. An array of implanted cardio defibrillators made by Medtronic rely on two types of radio-based consoles for initial setup, periodic maintenance, and regular monitoring. Doctors use the company's CareLink Programmer in clinics, while patients use the MyCareLink Monitor in homes to regularly ensure the defibrillators are working properly.

  • New vulnerability reporting platform aims to make open source safer [Ed: Ad disguised as an article for firm that works with Microsoft and never speaks about back doors in proprietary software]

12 open source tools for natural language processing

Filed under
OSS

Natural language processing (NLP), the technology that powers all the chatbots, voice assistants, predictive text, and other speech/text applications that permeate our lives, has evolved significantly in the last few years. There are a wide variety of open source NLP tools out there, so I decided to survey the landscape to help you plan your next voice- or text-based application.

For this review, I focused on tools that use languages I'm familiar with, even though I'm not familiar with all the tools. (I didn't find a great selection of tools in the languages I'm not familiar with anyway.) That said, I excluded tools in three languages I am familiar with, for various reasons.

The most obvious language I didn't include might be R, but most of the libraries I found hadn't been updated in over a year. That doesn't always mean they aren't being maintained well, but I think they should be getting updates more often to compete with other tools in the same space. I also chose languages and tools that are most likely to be used in production scenarios (rather than academia and research), and I have mostly used R as a research and discovery tool.

Read more

Devices: Indigo Igloo, Raspberry Pi Projects and Ibase

Filed under
Hardware
  • AR-controlled robot could help people with motor disabilities with daily tasks

    Researchers employed the PR2 robot running Ubuntu 14.04 and an open-source Robot Operating System called Indigo Igloo for the study. The team made adjustments to the robot including padding metal grippers and adding “fabric-based tactile sensing” in certain areas.

  • 5 IoT Projects You Can Do Yourself on a Raspberry Pi

    Are you new to the Internet of Things and wonder what IoT devices can do for you? Or do you just have a spare Raspberry Pi hanging around and are wondering what you can do with it? Either way, there are plenty of ways to put that cheap little board to work.

    Some of these projects are easy while others are much more involved. Some you can tackle in a day while others will take a while. No matter what, you’re bound to at least get some ideas looking at this list.

  • Retail-oriented 21.5-inch panel PCs run on Kaby Lake and Bay Trail

    Ibase’s 21.5-inch “UPC-7210” and “UPC-6210” panel PCs run Linux or Windows on 7th Gen Kaby Lake-U and Bay Trail CPUs, respectively. Highlights include 64GB SSDs, mini-PCIe, mSATA, and IP65 protection.

NexDock 2 Turns Your Android Phone or Raspberry Pi into a Laptop

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Ever wished your Android smartphone or Raspberry Pi was a laptop? Well, with the NexDock 2 project, now live on Kickstarter, it can be!

Both the name and the conceit should be familiar to long-time gadget fans. The original NexDock was a 14.1-inch laptop shell with no computer inside. It successfully crowdfunded back in 2016.

The OG device made its way in to the hands of thousands of backers. While competent enough, some of-the-time reviews were tepid about the dock’s build quality.

After a brief stint fawning over Intel’s innovative (now scrapped) Compute Cards, the team behind the portable device is back with an updated, refined and hugely improved model.

Read more

Graphics: Libinput 1.13 RC2, NVIDIA and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • libinput 1.12.902
    The second RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    This is the last RC, expect the final within the next few days unless
    someone finds a particulaly egregious bug.
    
    One user-visible change: multitap (doubletap or more) now resets the timer
    on release as well. This should improve tripletap detection as well as any
    tripletap-and-drag and similar gestures.
    
    valgrind is no longer a required dependency to build with tests. It was only
    used in a specific test run anyway (meson test --setup=valgrind) and not
    part of the regular build.
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below.
    
    Benjamin Poirier (1):
          evdev: Rename button up and down states to mirror each other
    
    Feldwor (1):
          Set TouchPad Pressure Range for Toshiba L855
    
    Paolo Giangrandi (1):
          touchpad: multitap state transitions use the same timing used for taps
    
    Peter Hutterer (3):
          tools: flake8 fixes, typo fixes and missing exception handling
          meson.build: make valgrind optional
          libinput 1.12.902
  • Libinput 1.13 RC2 Better Detects Triple Taps

    Peter Hutterer of Red Hat announced the release of libinput 1.13 Release Candidate 2 on Thursday as the newest test release for this input handling library used by both X.Org and Wayland Linux systems.

    Libinput 1.13 will be released in the days ahead as the latest six month update to this input library. But with the time that has passed, it's not all that exciting of a release as the Logitech high resolution scrolling support as well as Dell Totem input device support for the company's Canvas display was delayed to the next release cycle. But libinput 1.13 is bringing touch arbitration improvements for tablets, various new quirks, and other fixes and usability enhancements.

  • Open-Source NVIDIA PhysX 4.1 Released

    Software releases are aplenty for GDC week and NVIDIA's latest release is their newest post-4.0 PhysX SDK.

    NVIDIA released the open-source PhysX 4.0 SDK just before Christmas as part of the company re-approaching open-source for this widely used physics library. Now the latest available is PhysX 4.1 and the open-source code drop is out in tandem.

  • AMD have launched an update to their open source Radeon GPU Analyzer, better Vulkan support

    AMD are showing off a little here, with an update to the Radeon GPU Analyzer open source project and it sounds great.

New Release of GNU Parallel and New FSF-Endorsed Products From ThinkPenguin

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Parallel 20190322 ('FridayforFuture') released

    GNU Parallel 20190322 ('FridayforFuture') has been released. It is available for download at: http://ftpmirror.gnu.org/parallel/
    The change in signalling makes this release experimental for users that send SIGTERM to GNU Parallel.

  • Seven new devices from ThinkPenguin, Inc. now FSF-certified to Respect Your Freedom

    Thursday, March 21st, 2019 -- The Free Software Foundation (FSF) today awarded Respects Your Freedom (RYF) certification to seven devices from ThinkPenguin, Inc.: The Penguin Wireless G USB Adapter (TPE-G54USB2), the Penguin USB Desktop Microphone for GNU / Linux (TPE-USBMIC), the Penguin Wireless N Dual-Band PCIe Card (TPE-N300PCIED2), the PCIe Gigabit Ethernet Card Dual Port (TPE-1000MPCIE), the PCI Gigabit Ethernet Card (TPE-1000MPCI), the Penguin 10/100 USB Ethernet Network Adapter v1 (TPE-100NET1), and the Penguin 10/100 USB Ethernet Network Adapter v2 (TPE-100NET2). The RYF certification mark means that these products meet the FSF's standards in regard to users' freedom, control over the product, and privacy.

    [...]

    "I've always believed that the biggest difficulty for users in the free software world has been in obtaining compatible hardware, and so I'm glad to be participating in the expansion of the RYF program" said Christopher Waid, founder and CEO of ThinkPenguin.

    ThinkPenguin, Inc. was one of the first companies to receive RYF certification, gaining their first and second certifications in 2013, and adding several more over the years since.

    "ThinkPenguin has excelled for years in providing users with the tools they need to control their own computing. We are excited by these new additions today, and look forward to what they have in store for the future," said the FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Donald Robertson, III.

  • FSF Certifies A USB Microphone For Respecting Your Freedom Plus Some Network Adapters

    The Free Software Foundation has announced the latest batch of hardware it has certified for "Respecting Your Freedom" as part of its RYF program.

    Seven more devices from Linux-focused e-tailer Think Penguin have been certified for respecting your freedoms and privacy in that no binary blobs are required for use nor any other restrictions on the hardware's use or comprising the user's privacy.

Events: Red Hat Summit 2019, SUSECON Featuring Microsoft, and LibrePlanet About to Start

Filed under
OSS
  • More keynotes hitting the stage at Red Hat Summit 2019

    Red Hat Summit 2019 is the industry’s premier enterprise open source technology conference. A place to come together to share ideas, collaborate with peers, learn from the work of others and celebrate advancements in open source. This year, we encourage you to think beyond your normal day-to-day, beyond the limitations and challenges you face, expand your possibilities to think about AND.

    No longer about having to choose, what if you could scale your technology AND culture to meet your needs to help you not just survive, but thrive in a changing business landscape? Think Linux AND containers. Think public AND private cloud. That’s what you’ll find at Red Hat Summit.

  • Red Hat Summit 2019 session highlights: Hybrid cloud infrastructure

    Cloud computing should not be a world that is dominated by public clouds or on-premises datacenters; instead, it should be a blend of technologies that create the concept of hybrid cloud. The Red Hat Global Customer Tech Outlook for 2019 further details this point, with only six percent of respondents planning a pure public cloud strategy, while 30 percent have a hybrid cloud strategy.

    So what exactly is the hybrid cloud mix? And how can you handle multiple public clouds plus on-premises resources? What about Kubernetes and containers? How is anyone REALLY doing this?

    At Red Hat Summit 2019, May 7-9 in Boston, Red Hat aims to address these questions and more around hybrid cloud infrastructure and strategies. From Kubernetes and Linux containers to hybrid cloud storage and functions-as-a-service (FaaS), presenters at Red Hat Summit will break these concepts down using real world examples to highlight the power, scale and innovation of hybrid cloud infrastructure in modern computing environments.

  • SUSECON 2019 Sponsors, Keynotes and Breakout Sessions Announced! [Ed: Microsoft a sponsor and thus keynote talk]

    At SUSECON 2019, we will be collaborating with our partners to showcase open source business technologies that transform.

  • LibrePlanet is coming in two days! Here's how you can participate

    It's almost time for LibrePlanet -- the Free Software Foundation annual conference and associate members' meeting -- and we couldn't be more excited! There is so much going on at the conference, great events in the evenings, a raffle, an exhibit hall, and an amazing collection of free software enthusiasts from around the world. We hope to see you there! Registration may be closed, but you can still register for the conference on-site, space permitting.

    In the event you can't make it to LibrePlanet, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA, there are ways to get involved! We have three ways to enable remote participation: IRC, mumble, and, of course, the livestream. We provide these resources, along with video streaming, so that free software supporters who are unable to travel to the US for economic and/or political reasons are still able to participate.

Release of HardenedBSD 1200058.4 and BSD Now 290

Filed under
BSD
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today's howtos

Linux Tests Of The QNINE M.2 NVMe SSD Enclosure To USB-C Adapter

In the past few months a number of M.2 NVMe SSD to USB adapters have been appearing on the market. Curious about the performance potential on Linux of an NVMe SSD drive attached to a USB 3.1 connection, I recently picked up a QNINE NVMe solid-state drive enclosure for benchmarking. The QNINE NVMe SSD enclosure is an M.2 NVMe to USB-C/USB-3.1 adapter that retails for about $40 USD from the likes of Amazon. Only Windows and macOS support is mentioned, but the drive was detected just fine and working under Linux. This QNINE adapter is just one of many M.2 NVMe to USB-C adapters on the market and most in the $40~60 USD price range. Read more

Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available

The new software release, Sailfish OS Oulanka is now available! This time, the name for Sailfish OS 3.0.2 update was inspired by one of our sailor’s favorite locations: Oulanka National Park. Oulanka is a national park in Lapland and Northern Ostrobothnia regions of Finland, covering 270 km². This park is known in Finland by adventurers due to it is famous trekking route, Karhunkierros, a four day – eighty kilometer route – located in Oulanka and accessible all year round. Oulanka was the first of the two Finnish national parks to become part of World Wide Fund for Nature’s PAN Parks. Read more

Games: Google Stadia, Forge and Fight, Relic Hunters Legend, Port Valley

  • Google Stadia Gaming Platform Needs Min 25Mb/s Internet Speed
    Google has released the specifications of its upcoming game streaming platform known as Google Stadia. The game streaming platform from the tech giant will use custom made processor and an ultra-fast graphics card in its forthcoming console. While the CPU will be a 2.7GHz x86 custom-made chip with hyper-threading and 9.5 MB L2+L2 cache, AMD will handle the graphical duties with a 10.7 Teraflops GPU with 56 compute units and HMB2 memory. Stadia machine will have 16GB of RAM along with 484GB/s of high transfer speed. Additionally, an SSD will be used for maximum performance to increase the load-time.
  • Forge and Fight might be the most hilarious prototype I've played recently
    Always keen to see what new types of experiences developers are looking to offer, I often try out game prototypes. Forge and Fight is one where you make your own weapon and it's pretty amusing. Since it's a prototype, it's obviously quite basic. However the promise with this one is very clear! Pick a handle and then basically stick anything on it and swing it around at your enemies! How about a fancy looking sword? Sure you could do that—or you could swing around multiple Scythes attached by a chain link with a flamethrower, a couple of spike balls and a boxing glove because why the hell not.
  • The shoot and loot RPG 'Relic Hunters Legend' is looking good in the latest trailer
    ...it's coming to Linux and certainly still seems to be that way as the trailer even has the Linux "tux" logo included and the current FAQ clearly mentions Linux as a platform...
  • Port Valley, a "not so classic" point & click adventure now has a Linux demo
    From developer WrongPixel, Port Valley is an in development point & click adventure that's "not so" classic apparently. Honestly, I had never heard of this before or at least I don't remember hearing about it at all. Turns out a few days ago it gained a Linux demo and it does seem to work quite nicely. Seems like a very interesting point and click game, one the developer said is only aiming to borrow some mechanics from the past while showing the genre "still has a lot to say".