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Saturday, 20 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OpenBSD: New Dnsmasq, New OpenSSH and New OpenBSD Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2018 - 7:48am
Story FOSS in Digital Currencies Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2018 - 7:37am
Story MongoDB Becomes Less Affero GPL-Like Roy Schestowitz 3 19/10/2018 - 6:35am
Story Suddenly Linux runs in Android Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2018 - 6:30am
Story Linux Devices: ARM/Linux in Servers and Embedded, Chromecast Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2018 - 6:17am
Story Love Microsoft Teams? Love Linux? Then you won't love this Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2018 - 6:14am
Story Red Hat News and Developments Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2018 - 4:47am
Story Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) Is Now Available to Download Rianne Schestowitz 3 19/10/2018 - 3:55am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2018 - 3:43am
Story Games: Steam Play Games, Puzlogic, and Rocket League ‘RocketID’ Delays Roy Schestowitz 19/10/2018 - 3:29am

Mozilla: Search, Decentralised Web and Rust

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Searchfox in Phabricator extension

    Being able to search code while reviewing can be really useful, but unfortunately it’s not so straightforward. Many people resort to loading the patch under review in an IDE in order to be able to search code.

    Being able to do it directly in the browser can make the workflow much smoother.

    To support this use case, I’ve built an extension for Phabricator that integrates Searchfox code search functionality directly in Phabricator differentials. This way reviewers can benefit from hovers, go-to-definition and find-references without having to resort to the IDE or without having to manually navigate to the code on searchfox.org or dxr.mozilla.org. Moreover, compared to searchfox.org or dxr.mozilla.org, the extension highlights both the pre-patch view and the post-patch view, so reviewers can see how pre-existing variables/functions are being used after the patch.

  • Searching Made Faster, the Latest Firefox Exploration

    earch is one of the most common activities that people do whenever they go online. At Mozilla, we are always looking for ways to streamline that experience to make it fast, easy and convenient for our users.

    Our Firefox browser provides a variety of options for people to search the things and information they seek when they’re on the web, so we want to make search even easier. For instance, there are two search boxes on every home or new tab page – one is what we call the “awesome bar” also known as the URL bar, and the other is the search box in the home/new tab pages.

    In the awesome bar, users can use a shortcut to their queries by simply entering a predefined keyword (like @google) and typing the actual search term they are seeking, whether it’s the nearest movie theater location and times for the latest blockbuster movie or finding a sushi restaurant close to their current location. These Search Keywords have been part of the browser experience for years, yet it’s not commonly known. Here’s a hint to enable it: Go to “Preferences,” then “Search” and check “ One-Click Search Engines”.

  • Dweb: Decentralised, Real-Time, Interoperable Communication with Matrix

    Matrix is an open standard for interoperable, decentralised, real-time communication over the Internet. It provides a standard HTTP API for publishing and subscribing to real-time data in specified channels, which means it can be used to power Instant Messaging, VoIP/WebRTC signalling, Internet of Things communication, and anything else that can be expressed as JSON and needs to be transmitted in real-time over HTTP. The most common use of Matrix today is as an Instant Messaging platform.

  • This Week in Rust 256

GNU: GCC 9 Feature Development Is Ending Next Month, GCC's Test Suite To Begin Testing C++17 By Default

Filed under
Development
GNU
  • GCC 9 Feature Development Is Ending Next Month

    There is just three weeks left for GNU toolchain developers to finish landing new feature material in GCC 9.0 ahead of next year's GCC 9.1 stable release.

    Richard Biener of SUSE announced today that GCC's "stage 1" development will shift to "stage 3" on 11 November. This marks the point at which open feature development is over and will then focus on bug-fixing... No new features are generally allowed in during this stage. On 6 January 2019 is when they intend to begin their final period of only working on regression fixes and documentation updates.

  • GCC's Test Suite To Begin Testing C++17 By Default

    GCC's test suite will soon begin testing the C++17 standard as part of its C++98/11/14 standard tests by default... This doesn't affect the default C++ standard used by the GCC G++ compiler at this point, but at least will help eliminate any lingering C++17 bugs as well as helping to stop regressions in the future.

    With the GCC test suite's test cases having cleared through the last of the C++17 issues, Marek Polacek of Red Hat sent out the patch today to begin testing C++17 by default when running its test suite. C++17 is tested in addition to the earlier C++98, C++11, and C++14 standards.

KDE and openSUSE, Leap 15.1

Filed under
SUSE
  • KDE and openSUSE: Plasma 5.14, Qt 5.12 and more

    Plasma 5.14 was released with many improvements.

    It was planned to have it in a released in a Tumbleweed snapshot on the same day, but openQA issues prevented snapshot 20181008 from getting published. Instead, Tumbleweed users got it with snapshot 20181009 on Thursday morning. Currently, 5.14.1 is staged to be accepted in Tumbleweed.

    To get it on Leap 15 (and even 42.3 with restrictions), you can add https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:KDE_repositories#KDE_Frameworks_5.2C_Plasma_5_and_Applications. Note that those are not part of the official distribution and therefore not as well supported.

  • OpenSUSE Begins Preparing For Leap 15.1 (15 Service Pack 1)

    As part of some brief openSUSE news today, some early details concerning Leap 15 Service Pack 1 (Leap 15.1) were shared.

    The main user-facing changes of the forthcoming openSUSE Leap 15.1 is that with this first service pack release Qt WebKit is being removed from the default installation. On the desktop side it will be shipping KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS in its latest point release at the time. It will also be shipping with the very latest KDE Applications and KDE Frameworks packages.

Games: RimWorld, Civilization VI, Steam Play's Proton

Filed under
Gaming

Linux-powered Jetson Xavier module gains third-party carriers

Filed under
Linux

CTI announced two carrier boards for the Nvidia’s AI/robotics focused Jetson AGX Xavier module: a compact Rogue carrier and a Mimic Adapter that plugs the Xavier into any CTI Jetson TX2/TX2i/TX1 carrier.

Connect Tech, Inc. (CTI) has released two new developer options for Nvidia’s octa-core Jetson AGX Xavier computer-on-module, which is already supported by Nvidia’s innovative, $1,299 Jetson Xavier Developer Kit . Like the official dev kit, CTI’s 105 x 92mm Rogue board is approximately the same size as the 105 x 87 x 16mm Xavier, making it easier to use for robotics applications.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux-Focused Penguin Computing Banking On AI Infrastructure
  • Spinnaker: The Kubernetes of Continuous Delivery

    Comparing Spinnaker and Kubernetes in this way is somewhat unfair to both projects. The scale, scope, and magnitude of these technologies are different, but parallels can still be drawn.

    Just like Kubernetes, Spinnaker is a technology that is battle tested, with Netflix using Spinnaker internally for continuous delivery. Like Kubernetes, Spinnaker is backed by some of the biggest names in the industry, which helps breed confidence among users. Most importantly, though, both projects are open source, designed to build a diverse and inclusive ecosystem around them.

  • Tracktion 7 – A Full Featured Digital Audio Workstation for Music Creators [Ed: When "free, cross-platform" is just a marketing term for proprietary software with a restrictive licence]

    FossMint has covered software for audio creation and manipulation in the past (e.g. Ardour and Audacity) and we even covered Operating Systems created with media creation in focus (e.g Ubuntu Studio and AV Linux).

    Today, we bring you an amazing tool for professional use that anybody with an interest in music creation and time can easily make use of. It goes by the name of Tracktion 7.

    Tracktion 7 is a free, cross-platform, DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) for music creators of all classes. It features an equalizer, input, waveform, level, pan, and plugins which are all displayed left-to-right in an intuitive single-screen interface.

    Its users have access to an unlimited number of audio and MIDI tracks coupled with tools to facilitate easier music composing, recording, mixing, and sharing processes.

  • KDE Bugsquad – Konsole Bug Day on October 20th, 2018

    We will be holding a Bug Day on October 20th, 2018, focusing on Konsole. Join at any time, the event will be occurring all day long!

    This is a great opportunity for anyone, especially non-developers to get involved!

  • KDE Plasma5 for Slackware – october ’18 batch

    Today the Plasma developer team released Plasma 5.14.1 which was what I was waiting for. I was a bit hesitant to add a major new release (5.14.0) to my monthly refresh for Slackware and opted for this point release.

    And now “KDE-5_18.10” has been uploaded to the ‘ktown‘ repository. Again I was able to offer a full set of updates.

    What’s new

    The October release of KDE Plasma5 for Slackware contains the KDE Frameworks 5.51.0, Plasma 5.14.1 and Applications 18.08.2. All this on top of Qt 5.11.2 which was updated inbetween the two monthly ‘ktown’ releases.
    There were two updates in the ‘extras’ section for Applications: new versions for ‘krita’ and ‘okteta”. The ‘deps’ section saw some changes as well: ‘PyQt5’ was updated to work properly with Qt 5.11.2, a newer version of ‘sip’ had to be added for that same reason – it replaces the somewhat older Slackware package. And a new package ‘python-enum34’ package had to be added, it is a dependency for the Python2 support in PyQt5.

  • How to accelerate your digital transformation with open source technologies

    Businesses worldwide are on track to spend $1.1 Trillion on Digital Transformation in 2018 according to IDC. Executives tasked with driving transformation have to balance funding innovation initiatives with keeping the lights on. Maintaining existing infrastructure is necessary but when much of the budget is used to maintain the status quo, transformation efforts slow down to a crawl. New competitors disrupting established companies are not saddled with the burden of maintaining legacy infrastructure. They can innovate faster, using new business models and technologies like Cloud Computing, Artificial Intelligence, industrial IoT, and Real Time Analytics. What do all these technologies have in common? The foundation for these transformational technologies is open source software.

  • Shutter Removed From Ubuntu 18.10 And Debian Unstable, New PPA Available

    The popular screenshot tool, which uses Gtk2 and Perl, was one of the very few packages that blocked Debian (and Ubuntu) from removing the obsolete libgnome2-perl and libgnome2-vfs-perl from the repository archive. Since Shutter doesn't work without these packages, it was removed from the Debian Unstable and Ubuntu 18.10 repositories.

  •  

  • La Frite Linux Mini Computer Looks Like An Ultra-affordable Raspberry Pi Alternative

    Raspberry Pi has been able to inspire a wide range of open source Linux computer boards. Some of the notable names include Orange Pi, Asus Tinker Board, Banana Pi, etc. Also, from time-to-time, new and promising projects keep appearing on Kickstarter and Indiegogo that promise to provide a better value at lower cost.

    Just recently, I came across a similar project that goes by the name La Frite. This open source mini computer is available for backing and it aims to ship in November. The project has already crossed its $10,000 aim.

  • The New Kindle Paperwhite is Waterproof, Still Affordable [Ed: These run Linux, but Bezos uses these to remotely delete your books...]
  • The new Kindle Paperwhite is thinner and waterproof

    The Voyage may be dead, but the Kindle line still has some life left in it. This time last year, Amazon upgraded the high-end Oasis model, and now the mid-range Paperwhite is getting a little love.The workhorse of the company’s devoted e-reader line just got a handful of upgrades that will give users a more premium experience, while keeping the device’s starting price at $130.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • We already have nice things, and other reasons not to write in-house ops tools

    When I was an ops consultant, I had the "great fortune" of seeing the dark underbelly of many companies in a relatively short period of time. Such fortune was exceptionally pronounced on one client engagement where I became the maintainer of an in-house deployment tool that had bloated to touch nearly every piece of infrastructure—despite lacking documentation and testing. Dismayed at the impossible task of maintaining this beast while tackling the real work of improving the product, I began reviewing my old client projects and probing my ops community for their strategies. What I found was an epidemic of "not invented here" (NIH) syndrome and a lack of collaboration with the broader community.

  • Open Source Program Benefits Survey Results

    There are many organizations out there, from companies like Red Hat to internet scale giants like Google and Facebook that have established an open source programs office (OSPO). The TODO Group, a network of open source program managers, recently performed the first ever annual survey of corporate open source programs and revealed some interesting findings on the actual benefits of open source programs.

  • LLVM Still Proceeding With Their Code Relicensing

    It's been three years since the original draft proposal for relicensing the LLVM compiler code was sent out and while there hasn't been a lot to report on recently about the effort, they are making progress and proceeding.

    Since 2015 LLVM developers have been discussing relicensing to an Apache 2.0 license to help motivate new contributors, protect users of LLVM code, better protect existing contributors, ensure that LLVM run-time libraries can be used by both other open-source and proprietary compilers.

  • Automating upstream releases with release-bot

    Good news: We have developed a tool called release-bot that automates the process. All you need to do is file an issue into your upstream repository and release-bot takes care of the rest. But let’s not get ahead of ourselves. First, let’s look at what needs to be set up for this automation to happen. I’ve chosen the meta-test-family upstream repository as an example.

Security: Facebook, GNU Binutils and Epson/HP

Filed under
Security
  • What To Do If Your Account Was Caught in the Facebook Breach

    Keeping up with Facebook privacy scandals is basically a full-time job these days. Two weeks ago, it announced a massive breach with scant details. Then, this past Friday, Facebook released more information, revising earlier estimates about the number of affected users and outlining exactly what types of user data were accessed. Here are the key details you need to know, as well as recommendations about what to do if your account was affected.

    30 Million Accounts Affected

    The number of users whose access tokens were stolen is lower than Facebook originally estimated. When Facebook first announced this incident, it stated that attackers may have been able to steal access tokens—digital “keys” that control your login information and keep you logged in—from 50 to 90 million accounts. Since then, further investigation has revised that number down to 30 million accounts.

    The attackers were able to access an incredibly broad array of information from those accounts. The 30 million compromised accounts fall into three main categories. For 15 million users, attackers access names and phone numbers, emails, or both (depending on what people had listed).

  • GNU Binutils read_reloc Function Denial of Service Vulnerability [CVE-2018-18309]
  • Security Updates Are Even Breaking Your Printer (On Purpose)

    Printer manufacturers hate third-party ink cartridges. They want you buying the expensive, official ones. Epson and HP have issued sneaky “updates” that break these cheaper cartridges, forcing you to buy the expensive ones.

    HP pioneered this technique back in 2016, rolling out a “security update” to its OfficeJet and OfficeJet Pro printers that activated a helpful new feature—helpful for HP’s bottom line, at least. Now, before printing, the printer would verify you’re using new HP ink cartridges. If you’re using a competitor’s ink cartridge or a refilled HP ink cartridge, printing would stop. After some flaming in the press, HP sort-of apologized, but not really.

Kernel: Keeping Control in the Hands of the User and KUnit

Filed under
Linux
  • Keeping Control in the Hands of the User

    Various efforts always are underway to implement Secure Boot and to add features that will allow vendors to lock users out of controlling their own systems. In that scenario, users would look helplessly on while their systems refused to boot any kernels but those controlled by the vendors.

    The vendors' motivation is clear—if they control the kernel, they can then stream media on that computer without risking copyright infringement by the user. If the vendor doesn't control the system, the user might always have some secret piece of software ready to catch and store any streamed media that could then be shared with others who would not pay the media company for the privilege.

    Recently, Chen Yu and other developers tried to submit patches to enhance Secure Boot so that when the user hibernated the system, the kernel itself would encrypt its running image. This would appear to be completely unnecessary, since as Pavel Machek pointed out, there is already uswsusp (userspace software suspend), which encrypts the running image before suspending the system. As Pavel said, the only difference was that uswusp ran in userspace and not kernel space.

  • Google Engineer Proposes KUnit As New Linux Kernel Unit Testing Framework

    Google engineer Brendan Higgins sent out an experimental set of 31 patches today introducing KUnit as a new Linux kernel unit testing framework to help preserve and improve the quality of the kernel's code.

    KUnit is a unit testing framework designed for the Linux kernel and inspired by the well known JUnit as well as Googletest and other existing unit testing frameworks for designing unit tests and related functionality.

DragonFlyBSD Continues Squeezing More Performance Out Of AMD's Threadripper 2990WX

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

DragonFlyBSD 5.4 should be a really great release if you are a BSD user and have an AMD Threadripper 2 box, particularly the flagship Threadripper 2990WX 32-core / 64-thread processor.

The project leader of this long ago fork from FreeBSD, Matthew Dillon, has been quite outspoken about the Threadripper 2990WX since he purchased one earlier this summer. This prolific BSD developer has been praising the performance out of the Threadripper 2990WX since he got the system working on the current DragonFlyBSD 5.3 development builds.

Since getting DragonFlyBSD running on the Threadripper 2 hardware in August, he's routinely been making performance tuning optimizations to DragonFly's kernel to benefit the 2990WX given its NUMA design.

Read more

Arm Launches Mbed Linux and Extends Pelion IoT Service

Filed under
Linux

Politics and international relations may be fraught with acrimony these days, but the tech world seems a bit friendlier of late. Last week Microsoft joined the Open Invention Network and agreed to grant a royalty-free, unrestricted license of its 60,000-patent portfolio to other OIN members, thereby enabling Android and Linux device manufacturers to avoid exorbitant patent payments. This week, Arm and Intel kept up the happy talk by agreeing to a partnership involving IoT device provisioning.

Arm’s recently announced Pelion IoT Platform will align with Intel’s Secure Device Onboard (SDO) provisioning technology to make it easier for IoT vendors and customers to onboard both x86 and Arm-based devices using a common Peleon platform. Arm also announced Pelion related partnerships with myDevices and Arduino (see farther below).

Read more

Programming: Version Control With Git, 5 Things Your Team Should Do to Make Pull Requests Less Painful and More GitHub Workflow Automation

Filed under
Development
  • How to Use Git Version Control System in Linux [Comprehensive Guide]

    Version Control (revision control or source control) is a way of recording changes to a file or collection of files over time so that you can recall specific versions later. A version control system (or VCS in short) is a tool that records changes to files on a filesystem.

    There are many version control systems out there, but Git is currently the most popular and frequently used, especially for source code management. Version control can actually be used for nearly any type of file on a computer, not only source code.

  • 5 Things Your Team Should Do to Make Pull Requests Less Painful

    A user story is a short description of a unit of work that needs doing. It’s normally told from the perspective of the user, hence the name. The journey towards a good pull request starts with a well-written user story. It should be scoped to a single thing that a user can do in the system being built.

  • More GitHub workflow automation

    The more you use computers, the more you see the potentials for automating everything. Who doesn't love that? By building Mergify those last months, we've decided it was time bring more automation to the development workflow.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Games: Cultist Simulator, Planetary Annihilation: TITANS, CrossOver 18, Updated Proton 3.16 Beta, Descenders, Bridge Constructor Portal, Train Valley 2, Sipho

Filed under
Gaming

Security: Stamos, E-mail and RAT Arrest

Filed under
Security

Browsing the web with Min, a minimalist open source web browser

Filed under
OSS
Web

Does the world need another web browser? Even though the days of having a multiplicity of browsers to choose from are long gone, there still are folks out there developing new applications that help us use the web.

One of those new-fangled browsers is Min. As its name suggests (well, suggests to me, anyway), Min is a minimalist browser. That doesn't mean it's deficient in any significant way, and its open source, Apache 2.0 license piques my interest.

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More in Tux Machines

BSD: FreeBSD 12.0 Beta and Upgrading OpenBSD with Ansible

Graphics: XRGEARS and Arcan's Latest

  • XRGEARS: Infamous "Gears" Now On VR Headsets With OpenHMD, Vulkan
    Well, the virtual reality (VR) demo scene is now complete with having glxgears-inspired gears and Utah teapot rendering on VR head mounted displays with the new XRGEARS. Kidding aside about the gears and teapot, XRGEARS is a nifty new open-source project with real value by Collabora developer Lubosz Sarnecki. XRGEARS is a standalone VR demo application built using the OpenHMD initiative for tracking and Vulkan for rendering. XRGEARS supports both Wayland and X11 environments or even running off KMS itself. This code also makes use of VK_EXT_direct_mode_display with DRM leasing.
  • Arcan versus Xorg – Approaching Feature Parity
    This is the first article out of three in a series where I will go through what I consider to be the relevant Xorg feature set, and compare it, point by point, to how the corresponding solution or category works in Arcan. This article will solely focus on the Display Server set of features and how they relate to Xorg features, The second article will cover the features that are currently missing (e.g. network transparency) when they have been accounted for. The third article will cover the features that are already present in Arcan (and there are quite a few of those) but does not exist in Xorg.
  • Arcan Display Server Is Nearing Feature Parity With The X.Org Server
    The Arcan display server, which started off years ago sounding like a novelty with being a display server built off a game engine in part and other interesting features, is nearing feature parity with the X.Org Server. While most hobbyist display server projects have failed, Arcan has continued advancing and with an interesting feature set. Recently they have even been working on a virtual reality desktop and an interesting desktop in general. Arcan is getting close to being able to offering the same functionality as a traditional X.Org Server. If you are interested in a lengthy technical read about the differences between Arcan and X.Org, the Arcan developers themselves did some comparing and contrasting when it comes to the display support, windowing, input, font management, synchronization, and other areas.

CoC/Systemd Supremacy Over Linux Kernel

  • New Linux Code of Conduct Revisions: CoC Committee Added Plus Interpretation & Mediator
    The Linux Code of Conduct introduced last month that ended up being quite contentious will see some revisions just ahead of the Linux 4.19 stable kernel release. Greg Kroah-Hartman has outlined the planned changes as well as a new Code of Conduct Interpretation document. In the weeks since the Linux kernel CoC was merged, various patches were proposed but none merged yet. It turns out Greg KH was working in private with various kernel maintainers/developers on addressing their feedback and trying to come up with solutions to the contentious issues in private.
  • Some kernel code-of-conduct refinements
    Greg Kroah-Hartman has posted a series of patches making some changes around the newly adopted code of conduct. In particular, it adds a new document describing how the code is to be interpreted in the kernel community.
  • Systemd Adds Feature To Fallback Automatically To Older Kernels On Failure
    Systemd's latest feature is the concept of "boot counting" that will track kernel boot attempts and failures as part of an automatic boot assessment. Ultimately this is to provide automatic fallback to older kernels should a newer kernel be consistently failing. The feature was crafted over the past few months by Lennart Poettering himself to provide a way when making use of systemd-boot on UEFI systems it can automatically fallback to an older kernel if a newer kernel is consistently causing problems. This is treated as an add-on to the Boot Loader Specification. The systemd boot assessment is designed that it could also be used by non-UEFI systems and other boot platforms.

ODROID 'Hacker Board'

  • ODROID Rolling Out New Intel-Powered Single Board Computer After Trying With Ryzen
    While ODROID is most known for their various ARM single board computers (SBCs), some of which offer impressive specs, they have dabbled in x86 SBCs and on Friday announced the Intel-powered ODROID-H2. In the announcement they mentioned as well they were exploring an AMD Ryzen 5 2500U powered SBC computer, which offered fast performance but the price ended up being prohibitive. After the falling out with Ryzen over those cost concerns, they decided to go ahead with an Intel Geminilake SoC. Geminilake is slower than their proposed Ryzen board, but the price was reasonable and it ends up still being much faster than ODROID's earlier Apollolake SBC.
  • Odroid-H2 is world’s first Gemini Lake hacker board
    Hardkernel unveiled the Odroid-H2, the first hacker board with an Intel Gemini Lake SoC. The Ubuntu 18.10 driven SBC ships with 2x SATA 3.0, 2x GbE, HDMI and DP, 4x USB, and an M.2 slot for NVMe. When the Odroid-H2 goes on sale in November at a price that will be “higher than $100,” Hardkernel will join a small group of vendors that have launched a community backed x86-based SBC. This first open spec hacker board built around Intel’s new Gemini Lake SoC — and one of the first Gemini Lake SBCs of any kind — follows earlier Arm-based Odroid winners such as the Odroid-C2 Raspberry Pi pseudo clone and the octa-core Odroid-XU4.