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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New OSI President Steps Down srlinuxx 2 05/03/2005 - 5:04am
Story Cronkite denounces the war on drugs. srlinuxx 3 05/03/2005 - 6:07am
Story Texas Gaming Festival: Quick Peek at the LAN Party srlinuxx 06/03/2005 - 3:16pm
Story The Rock solidifies Doom movie role srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 2:29am
Story Bumbling Bully srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 2:30am
Story A Week with KDE 3.4rc1 srlinuxx 5 08/03/2005 - 3:46pm
Story Student in High School zombie terror threat srlinuxx 1 08/03/2005 - 4:00pm
Story European democracy bogus, says Open Source Consortium srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 4:27pm
Story Linux Making Inroads into Automotive Industry srlinuxx 1 08/03/2005 - 4:59pm
Blog entry Cooker (Mandrake 10.2b3) Woes srlinuxx 1 09/03/2005 - 7:08pm

Plasma 5.12.2 bugfix updates for 17.10 backports and 18.04 development release

Filed under
Security

Users of Kubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark can now upgrade via our backports PPA to the 2nd bugfix release (5.12.2) of the Plasma 5.12 LTS release series from KDE.

Likewise, testers of our development release 18.04 Bionic Beaver will receive the update imminently.

The full changelog of fixes for 5.12.2 can be found here.

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Create a wiki on your Linux desktop with Zim

Filed under
Linux

There's no denying the usefulness of a wiki, even to a non-geek. You can do so much with one—write notes and drafts, collaborate on projects, build complete websites. And so much more.

I've used more than a few wikis over the years, either for my own work or at various contract and full-time gigs I've held. While traditional wikis are fine, I really like the idea of desktop wikis. They're small, easy to install and maintain, and even easier to use. And, as you've probably guessed, there are a number a desktop wikis available for Linux.

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Living The Linux Laptop Lifestyle

Filed under
Linux

Another great advantage of open source software: you can run it off of a flash drive before installing it. And I have to admit that I loved Linux Lite's out-of-the-box feel, so much so that I reconsidered installing my number two selection: LXLE, which is designed for underpowered older machines. According to a label on the bottom of my Toughbook, this pre-Linux laptop was decommissioned in 2005, making it well over ten years old. And so I replaced the RAM, installed Linux Lite, and after a short period, I was back to living a Linux laptop lifestyle while waiting for my charger.

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Mentor Embedded Linux gains cloud-based IoT platform

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Linux

Mentor announced a “Mentor Embedded IoT Framework” platform that builds on top of Mentor Embedded Linux with cloud-based IoT cloud services ranging from device authentication and provisioning to monitoring and diagnostics.

Mentor’s Mentor Embedded IoT Framework (MEIF) extends its Yocto Project based Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) and Nucleus RTOS development platforms to provide cloud services for IoT device management. The platform mediates between these platforms and cloud service backends, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Eclipse IoT, Microsoft Azure, and Siemens MindSphere.

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Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

Filed under
Linux
OSS

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC.

Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers.

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Gemini PDA will ship with Android, but it also supports Debian, Ubuntu, Sailfish, and Postmarket OS (crowdfunding, work in progress)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The makers of the Gemini PDA plan to begin shipping the first units of their handheld computer to their crowdfunding campaign backers any day now. And while the folks at Planet Computer have been calling the Gemini PDA a dual OS device (with Android and Linux support) from the get go, it turns out the first units will actually just ship with Android.

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Red Hat: CO.LAB, Kubernetes/OpenShift, Self-Serving 'Study' and More

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Red Hat

Browsers: Mozilla and Iridium

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Best Web Browser

    When the Firefox team released Quantum in November 2017, they boasted it was "over twice as fast as Firefox from 6 months ago", and Linux Journal readers generally agreed, going as far as to name it their favorite web browser. A direct response to Google Chrome, Firefox Quantum also boasts decreased RAM usage and a more streamlined user interface.

  • Share Exactly What You See On-Screen With Firefox Screenshots

    A “screenshot” is created when you capture what’s on your computer screen, so you can save it as a reference, put it in a document, or send it as an image file for others to see exactly what you see.

  • What Happens when you Contribute, revisited

    I sat down to write a post about my students' experiences this term contributing to open source, and apparently I've written this before (and almost exactly a year ago to the day!) The thing about teaching is that it's cyclic, so you'll have to forgive me as I give a similar lecture here today.

    I'm teaching two classes on open source development right now, two sections in an introductory course, and another two in a follow-up intermediate course. The students are just starting to get some releases submitted, and I've been going through their blogs, pull requests, videos (apparently this generation likes making videos, which is something new for me), tweets, and the like. I learn a lot from my students, and I wanted to share some of what I'm seeing.

  • Iridium Browser: A Browser for the Privacy Conscience

    Iridium is a web browser based on Chromium project. It has been customized to not share your data and thus keeping your privacy intact.

Programming: Pyenv, GitHub, LLVM

Filed under
Development
  • Pyenv – Python Version Management Made Easier

    You’re a programmer who wants to test your python code on multiple different Python environments. What would you do? Install a specific python version and test your code and then uninstall that version and again install another different version and test code? No, wait! It is completely unnecessary. Say hello to Pyenv , an useful utility to manage multiple Python versions, simultaneously. It made the python version management easier than ever. It is used to install, uninstall and switch to multiple different versions of Python.

  • GitHub Predicts Hottest 2018 Open Source Trends

    As the world’s largest repository of open source projects, GitHub is in a unique position to witness what developers are up to. GitHub staff recently sifted through the site’s 2017’s data in order to identify top open source trends they predict will thrive in 2018.

  • What is LLVM? The power behind Swift, Rust, Clang, and more

    New languages, and improvements on existing ones, are mushrooming throughout the develoment landscape. Mozilla’s Rust, Apple’s Swift, Jetbrains’s Kotlin, and many other languages provide developers with a new range of choices for speed, safety, convenience, portability, and power.

    Why now? One big reason is new tools for building languages—specifically, compilers. And chief among them is LLVM (Low-Level Virtual Machine), an open source project originally developed by Swift language creator Chris Lattner as a research project at the University of Illinois.

Security: Reproducible Builds, Windows Phones, Debian, Mageia Identity Security Breach and More

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Security
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #147
  • Windows Phones Get Cumulative Update KB4074592, PDF Support Now Broken

    Just when you thought Windows 10 Mobile is dead, here’s Microsoft rolling out a new cumulative update for the platform as part of its February patching cycle.

    Windows 10 cumulative update KB4074592, which is also released on PCs running the Creators Update (version 1703) – phones have never received the Fall Creators Update, comes with little changes for mobile devices, though it does something that many users might notice.

    Microsoft doesn’t provide a separate change log for mobile and PC, so the release notes that you can find at the end of the article include all the improvements and security fixes that Microsoft included in KB4074592 for both platforms.

  • Time to Join Extended Long Term Support for Debian 7 Wheezy

    Debian 7 Wheezy LTS period ends on May 31st and some companies asked Freexian if they could get security support past this date. Since about half of the current team of paid LTS contributors is willing to continue to provide security updates for Wheezy, I have started to work on making this possible.

  • Hackers Infiltrated Tesla to Mine Cryptocurrency

    While Elon Musk was busy planning how to launch his Tesla Roadster into the depths of space last month, a hacker was silently using Tesla’s computing power to mine an unknown amount of cryptocurrency.

    The unidentified attackers found their way in through cracks in Tesla’s cloud environment, according to a report issued by RedLock security on February 20. The miners were able to gain access via an unprotected Tesla Kubernete console—an open source system that manages applications. Included on this console were the access credentials to Tesla’s Amazon Web Service. Once they obtained access to the console, the attackers were able to run scripts that allowed them to stealthily mine cryptocurrency.

  • Hacking at EPFL Toastmasters, Lausanne, tonight

    ...remember to turn off your mobile device or leave it at home, you never know when it might ring or become part of a demonstration.

  • Mageia Identity Security Breach

    A user was able to gain access to our LDAP database and has published the email addresses and names, as well as apparent password hashes, of anyone who has signed up to identity.mageia.org. However, the published hashes do not match those on record, and all capitalisation has been removed, so it is not clear that the actual passwords have been compromised. All of the passwords have since been reset as a security precaution. New rules have been added to prevent access to the LDAP server. The sysadmins are investigating how the fields were read, as the configuration should have specifically prevented this.

    The passwords stored by the Mageia LDAP server are hashed and salted, meaning that the full decryption of the password, if they have actually been leaked, into a human-usable format would require significant computing power for safe and complex passwords.

Canonical Donates Ubuntu Phones to UBports to Continue Ubuntu Touch Development

Filed under
Ubuntu

UBports devs announced today on Twitter that Canonical sent them a few old Ubuntu Phone devices to continue the development of the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system.

Now that Canonical has ceased the development of its revolutionary Unity 8 user interface for the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system used on smartphones from Meizu and BQ, the company decided to donate several devices to the UBports community.

UBports is recreating Ubuntu Touch, maintaining, updating, and modifying its code to offer the world a free and open source mobile operating system for those who want to use something else than Android, iOS, and what else is still out there.

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Also: Ubuntu Server 18.04 LTS Will Default To The New Installer

The New Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Server Installer

LibreOffice 6.1 Arrives in August with Revamped Online Experience, New Features

Filed under
LibO

Last week, we talked with The Document Foundation's marketing assistant Mike Saunders about the 1 million downloads milestone reached by the major LibreOffice 6.0 release in only two weeks after its launch, who told us that the team is already working on the next version, LibreOffice 6.1, due for release in August.

LibreOffice 6.1 will be the first major update to the 6.x series of the office suite and will add yet another layer of new features and improvements to the open-source and cross-platform office suite used by millions of computer users worldwide, and we'd like you to be the first to know about them.

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Open source COM runs mainline Linux on Microchip SAMA5D2 SiP

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Microchip unveiled an open source, mainline Linux ready “SAMA5D27 SOM” module based on a SiP implementation of its Cortex-A5-based SAMA5D27 SoC with 128MB RAM. The 40 x 38mm module is also available with a SOM1-EK1 dev board.

Long before it was acquired by Microchip Technology, Atmel has been producing a line of Linux-focused, Cortex-A5 based SAMA5 SoCs, but the only Atmel-branded SAMA5 boards were its open-spec Xplained development boards developed with Newark Element14. The SAMA5 family was always a side business to Atmel’s MCU line, with very little integration between the two. With its ATSAMA5D27-SOM1 (SAMA5D27 SOM1) module, which uses a system-in-package (SiP) implementation of Microchip’s SAMA5D27 SoC, Microchip is starting to bridge the gap between the SAMA5 product line and its much larger RTOS/MCU business.

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Purism's Linux Phone to Use Convergence for a Unified Experience Across Devices

Filed under
GNU
Linux

For Purism, the company that sells quality computers using a Linux-based operating system and are intended to protect user's privacy and freedom, designing a convergent Linux phone is a long-term goal to unify the mobile experience across various devices.

Purism's François Téchené shares some initial details on how the company plans to use convergence for their short and long-term design goals of Librem 5, the Linux smartphone that raised more than $2 million on Kickstarter last year, saying they're looking to unify the human experience across different device you might own.

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Leftovers: ExeeLinux Show/Unleaded Hangouts, Linux Foundation's CNCF/Akraino and More

Filed under
Misc
  • What’s Holding Linux Back – Unleaded Hangouts

    What’s Holding Linux Back? Obviously we’ve seen some growth, but it does feel like there may be some things that hold Linux back a bit. We discuss.

  • ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks

    ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks

  • How Kubernetes became the solution for migrating legacy applications

    In 2015, Google released Kubernetes as an open source project. It was an implementation of Google's internal system called Borg. Google and the Linux Foundation created the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to host Kubernetes (and other cloud-native projects) as an independent project governed by a community around it. Kubernetes quickly became one of the fastest growing open source projects in history, growing to thousands of contributors across dozens of companies and organizations.

    What makes Kubernetes so incredible is its implementation of Google's own experience with Borg. Nothing beats the scale of Google. Borg launches more than 2-billion containers per week, an average of 3,300 per second. At its peak, it's many, many more. Kubernetes was born in a cauldron of fire, battle-tested and ready for massive workloads.

  • Akraino, a New Linux Foundation Project, Aims to Drive Alignment Around High-Availability Cloud Services for Network Edge

    Akraino will offer users new levels of flexibility to scale edge cloud services quickly, to maximize the applications or subscribers supported on each server, and to help ensure the reliability of systems that must be up at all times. While several open source projects exist to help solve pieces of the puzzle, nothing currently meets the need for an edge infrastructure solution. Integration of existing efforts in this new project will help deliver ease of use, hardened reliability, unique features, and performance for carrier, provider, and IoT networks.

  • Absolute 15.0 Beta 4 released

    Based on Slackware64-current

    Another beta... with all the kernel updates, glib and such -- trying to make things easier on beta testers Smile

  • State of Wisconsin Investment Board Has $33.92 Million Stake in Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Security: Updates, Nintendo 'Hackers', Microsoft Windows Back Doors, and FlightSimLabs Malware

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Hackers Release Video Of Nintendo Switch Running A Linux Distro

    When it comes to porting software to potentially unsupported devices, hackers are quite comfortable to push themselves beyond the boundaries set by the manufactures.

  • Epidemic of cryptojacking can be traced to escaped NSA superweapon [Ed: It's a Microsoft Windows issue. All versions of Windows (ME onwards) have NSA back doors]

    It all started when the Shadow Brokers dumped a collection of NSA cyberweapons that the NSA had fashioned from unreported bugs in commonly used software, including versions of Windows. The NSA discovered these bugs and then hoarded them, rather than warning the public and/or the manufacturers about them, in order to develop weapons that turned these bugs into attacks that could be used against the NSA's enemies.

  • Flight Sim Company Embeds Malware to Steal Pirates’ Passwords

    Flight sim company FlightSimLabs has found itself in trouble after installing malware onto users' machines as an anti-piracy measure. Code embedded in its A320-X module contained a mechanism for detecting 'pirate' serial numbers distributed on The Pirate Bay, which then triggered a process through which the company stole usernames and passwords from users' web browsers.

Software and Games Leftovers

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • LXD Weekly Status #35

    This past week we’ve been focusing on a number of open pull requests, getting closer to merging improvements to our storage volume handling, unix char/block devices handling and the massive clustering branch that’s been cooking for a while.

    We’re hoping to see most of those land at some point this coming week.

    On the LXC side of things, the focus was on bugfixes and cleanups as well as preparing for the removal of the python3 and lua bindings from the main repository. We’re also making good progress on distrobuilder and hope to start moving some of our images to using it as the build tool very soon.

  • Performance Co-Pilot 4.0.0 released

    It gives me great pleasure to announce the first major-numbered PCP release in nine and a half years - PCP v4 - is here!

  • Performance Co-Pilot Sees First Major Version Bump In Nearly A Decade

    The Performance Co-Pilot open-source cross-platform monitoring/visualizing stack has reached version 4.0 as its first major version hike in almost ten years.

  •  

  • Sci-fi mystery 'The Station' has released, it’s a short but memorable experience

    What would happen if we discovered the existence of alien life? A question I've often asked and a question many games, films and books have covered in great detail. The Station [Steam] is a sci-fi mystery that sees you investigate The Espial, a space station sent to research a sentient alien civilization.

  • Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC released, some good content for a small price

    Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC [GOG, Steam] was released earlier this month, adding some really nice content at a small price to an already great game.

  • Parry and dodge your way to victory in 'Way of the Passive Fist', launching March 6th

    Way of the Passive Fist [Steam, Official Site] is a rather unique and very colourful arcade brawler and it's releasing with Linux support on March 6th.

KDE and GNOME Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Kdenlive Café tonight and beta AppImage

    The last months for Kdenlive have been very quiet from the outside – we were not very active on the bugtracker, did not make a lot of announcements, and the 17.12.x release cycle only contained very few minor bugfixes.

    The main reason for this was the huge work that went behind the scenes for a major code refactoring that was required to allow further developments. So after more than a year working on it, we hope to get ready for the 18.04 release!

  • [Krita] Interview with Christine Garner

    I did Archaeology in University and I love history, mythology, folklore and nature. I’ve always been drawing from an early age. I graduated in 2003 with an archaeology degree. I taught myself digital art and web coding skills for fun and practical reasons. I used to do self-employed web design and admin type jobs, but in 2013 I became disillusioned with my life and had depression. I took a Foundation art course in 2013 deciding to pursue my artistic passions instead.

  • Qt 5.11 Brings New Accessibility Backend on Windows

    Accessibility technology encompasses assistive tools such as screen readers, magnifiers and braille displays, as well as APIs and frameworks that allow applications to expose elements of their UI to such tools.

  • CSS Grid

    This would totally have been a tweet or a facebook post, but I’ve decided to invest a little more energy and post these on my blog, accessible to everybody. Getting old, I guess. We’re all mortal and the web isn’t open by its own.

    In the past few days I’ve been learning about CSS grid while redesigning Flatpak and Flathub sites (still coming). And with the knowledge of really grokking only a fraction of it, I’m in love.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.