Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 20 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu: Breaking The Industry Barriers srlinuxx 09/10/2012 - 2:44am
Story Firefox 16.0 What’s New srlinuxx 09/10/2012 - 2:41am
Story Steam has 15 Linux-compatible games so far srlinuxx 08/10/2012 - 10:34pm
Story A Linux user switches to DOS, Part Two srlinuxx 08/10/2012 - 10:33pm
Story The true legal vulnerability of Linux srlinuxx 08/10/2012 - 10:31pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 477 srlinuxx 08/10/2012 - 3:29pm
Story LibreOffice vs. OpenOffice, Part Deux srlinuxx 08/10/2012 - 3:27pm
Story Arch Linux switches to systemd srlinuxx 08/10/2012 - 3:25pm
Story Ubuntu Adds ‘Amazon Results’ Off Switch srlinuxx 06/10/2012 - 3:03am
Story This Week in Linux: Mageia, openSUSE, Dreamlinux srlinuxx 06/10/2012 - 2:59am

Samba developer wins annual Free Software award

Filed under

Andrew "Tridge" Tridgell was named this week as the winner of the annual Free Software Foundation award for his work as originator and developer of the Samba project. Samba reverse-engineered Microsoft's version of the Server Message Block (SMB) protocol, which is used for file-sharing and print services.

Linux 101: Best practice for security integrity auditing and recovery

Filed under

Two critical security considerations that are closely related to one another are ignored all too often: integrity auditing and recovery. This document is an overview of good security integrity auditing and recovery practices using a Linux operating system.

Installing Oracle10g on RHEL4

Filed under

This tip is all about installing Oracle Database 10g Release 2 ( Enterprise/Standard Edition for Linux x86 on a server running Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0 (RHEL4).


GRUB tips and tricks

Filed under

The GRand Unified Boot loader, or GRUB, has all but replaced the default boot loader on many GNU/Linux distributions. It includes some conveniences over LILO, the LInux LOader. One advantage is not having to remember to run /sbin/lilo every time you make a configuration change.

Judge Sets Hearing Date In Google, DOJ Case

Filed under

A federal judge has scheduled for next month a hearing on Google Inc.'s refusal to hand over information on search results to the Department of Justice, which is looking for evidence to bolster its attempt to revive an anti-porn law rejected by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Also: Google to combat spyware

LinuxAsia 2006 to be held in Delhi next month

Filed under

LINUX evangelists from industry, government and users would converge at Asia's premier Open Source conference and exposition - LinuxAsia 2006 - to be held in New Delhi between February 8-10. Speakers include Mr Mark Shuttleworth, Linux Pioneer and guru.

Rerun: Getting to Know Texstar

Filed under

The first original story run here on Tuxmachines was Genesis of an Operating System, a story of the creation and evolution of PCLinuxOS. I was thinking of running a "rerun" when it hit its one year anniversary, but with all the excitement of the new website for PCLinuxOS, I figured I'd strike while the iron was hot. Read up on your favorite developer and mine Here.

Free OSZoo

Filed under

Wanna try a Linux distribution without installing them? You can try them with 'qemu' processor emulator. QEMU emulator is the first step to Freedom. QEMU is able to emulate a virtual computer, including a processor and various peripherals.

Linux on amd64

Filed under

You'll probably find that linux is probably the OS with the most native amd64 (x86_64) users. BSD variants and Windows mostly have poor to no amd64 support and/or a smaller user base any way. However, there are still a few drawbacks compared to linux on 32-bit x86. So why do people use it then? And how?

Red Hat not working on the Mactel. Yet.

Filed under

Despite what you may have read about Red Hat Inc. working on porting Linux to Apple's Mactel, Red Hat isn't "officially" doing this. Yet.

Linux Patch Management

Filed under

When I first looked at this book, my reaction was more than a little unfavorable. Another rehash of man pages? Why would you need a book about "up2date" and "yum" etc.? Can't you read the man pages?

E-Mail Encryption for Linux: A Startup Guide

Filed under

Do you ever send confidential/extremely personal information or documents via e-mail? Did you know that when you do this, you're trusting every single sysadmin that runs every single one of what might be dozens of servers between your computer and the intended recipients, plus anyone who has hacked any of these servers? Encryption technology works better than trust, says Alizard.

Book Review: Running IPv6

Filed under

When I put together my IPv6 Addressing anthology in 1999, there were about a half-dozen books describing the "new" protocol. There are now more than 50. This one is very fine.

File Integrity Assessment via SSH

Filed under

File integrity assessment tools are commonly deployed in organizations to help assist forensic investigation after a security incident. The canonical problem with FIA tools, however, is protecting the database generated by the FIA tool, as well as the binary for the FIA tool itself, from unauthorized tampering by attackers who gain root access to the system.

Book Review - Point & Click!

Filed under

You might recognize Robin Miller by his nick "roblimo" on Slashdot. He's been the editor in chief of various OSDN properties including Slashdot, NewsForge, and the other "Forge" sites under the OSDN umbrella for a few years. Also the author of Point-and-Click Linux!, Roblimo has followed it with another book for new users with Point & Click!

Why we need Windows apps ported on Linux

Filed under

Novell is using its Cool Solutions community-relations website to conduct an online public survey to determine which Windows-only applications people want to run on their Linux systems. It's one thing when Linux Lovers of Outer Mongolia puts together a survey; it's another thing entirely when a billion-dollar software company does it.

Systems Management Platform Goes Open-Source

Filed under

The open-source community will see yet another offering in the systems management arena when Qlusters Inc. introduces its OpenQRM project.

DivX 6.1.1 codec for Linux developers (Tux: We still love you!)

Filed under

It's been a little while (ok.. 3 years Wink) since we last released a version of the DivX codec for Linux. Now that work on 6.1.1 is complete, we have decided not only to release the Windows version, but a Linux version too.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

  • Purchased a PlayStation 3 Between 2006 and 2010? You May Be Entitled to $65
    PS3 owners first qualified to receive compensation from Sony following the settlement of a lawsuit in 2016. That case dealt with the "OtherOS" feature that came with the console when it debuted. With OtherOS, Sony promised a new PlayStation that would operate like a computer, allowing users to partition their hard drive and install third-party operating systems like the open-source Linux software.
  • Moro – A Command Line Productivity Tool For Tracking Work Hours
    Keeping track of your work hours will give you an insight about the amount of work you get done in a specific time frame. There are plenty of GUI-based productivity tools available on the Internet for tracking work hours. However, I couldn’t find a good CLI-based tool. Today, I stumbled upon a a simple, yet useful tool named “Moro” for tracking work hours. Moro is a Finnish word which means “Hello”. Using Moro, you can find how much time you take to complete a specific task. It is free, open source and written using NodeJS.
  • Twenty years, 1998 – 2018
    curl 4.0 was just a little more than 2000 lines of C code. It featured 23 command line options. curl 4.0 introduced support for the FTP PORT command and now it could do ftp uploads that append to the remote file. The version number was bumped up from the 3.12 which was the last version number used by the tool under the old name, urlget.
  • What’s New in ArchLabs 2018.03
    ArchLabs 2018.03 is the latest release of Linux distribution based on Arch Linux featuring the Openbox window manager as the primary desktop interface. The project’s latest release ArchLabs 2018.03 brings a few fixes and improvements and improve the user. Powered by Linux kernel 4.15 series and based-on latest version of Arch Linux. LUKS and encryption is now working, for those security concious users out there you should be all go on the encryption side. There have been a few installer updates, base-devel is included at install time. Also the mirrorlist is optimised at the same time.
  • [Older] openSUSE.Asia Summit 2018: Call for Host
    The openSUSE.Asia organization committee is accepting proposals to host the openSUSE.Asia Summit during the second half of 2018. The openSUSE.Asia Summit is the largest annual openSUSE conference in Asia, attended by contributors and enthusiasts from all over Asia.
  • TidalScale Software-Defined Servers Now Support SUSE Linux Enterprise Server
    TidalScale, the leader in Software-Defined Servers, announced today that working in partnership with SUSE, the world’s first provider of Enterprise Linux, TidalScale has achieved SUSE Ready certification to ensure full compatibility with SUSE Linux Enterprise Server. TidalScale’s breakthrough scaling platform allows multiple industry standard servers to be combined into a single Software-Defined Server running a single instance of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server.
  • 8 Best Radio Apps For Android To Stream Online Music In 2018

Kernel and Graphics: Torvalds, Linux Foundation, Nouveau and libinput

  • Which Linux Distribution Does Linus Torvalds Use in 2018?
    We know a sizeable amount of his views on Linux distros, thanks to an interview he took long ago in 2007, but who knows – could he have changed his mind? In a 2007 interview, Linus professed that he didn’t use Debian because he found it hard to install, a statement I find interesting because he’s the guy who wrote GIT in C. Anyway, he buttressed his reason for not using Debian in a later interview from 2014, when he explained that because he is responsible for maintaining his computer and all the computers used by his household, he likes to use an OS with virtually no installation hassle. [...] As far as I know, he uses Fedora on most of his computers because of its fairly good support for PowerPC. He mentioned that he used OpenSuse at one point in time and complimented Ubuntu for making Debian accessible to the mass. So most of the flak on the internet about Linus disliking Ubuntu isn’t factual.
  • Linux Foundation, Intel launch open source IoT hypervisor
    The Linux Foundation has unveiled plans for a new open source project to provide streamlined embedded hypervisors for IoT devices. Called Acrn, the project has been assisted by Intel, which contributed code and engineering. The main thrust of the project is to create small, flexible virtual machines. ACRN comprises two main components: the hypervisor and its device model, complete with I/O mediators. The Linux-based hypervisor can run many ‘guest’ operating systems at the same time.
  • Nouveau NIR Support Appears Almost Baked, NV50 Support Added
    Karol Herbst at Red Hat started off this week by publishing his latest patches around Nouveau NIR support as part of the company's effort for getting SPIR-V/compute support up and running on this open-source NVIDIA driver. Red Hat's grand vision around open-source GPGPU compute still isn't entirely clear especially with Nouveau re-clocking not being suitable for delivering high performance at this point, but it must be grand given the number of developers they have working on improving the Linux GPU compute stack at the moment.
  • xf86-input-libinput 0.27.0 Released
    Aside from a few touchpad issues and other minor random issues with select hardware, libinput these days is mostly in great shape for being a generic input handling library that is working out well for both X.Org and Wayland users.

KDE: KDE Applications 18.04, KDE Connect, KMyMoney 5.0.1 and Qt Quick

  • KDE Applications 18.04 branches created
    Make sure you commit anything you want to end up in the KDE Applications 18.04 release to them :)
  • KDE Connect – State of the union
    We haven’t blogged about KDE Connect in a long time, but that doesn’t mean that we’ve been lazy. Some new people have joined the project and together we have implemented some exciting features. Our last post was about version 1.0, but recently we released version 1.8 of the Android app and 1.2.1 of the desktop component some time ago, which we did not blog about yet. Until now!
  • KMyMoney 5.0.1 released
    The KMyMoney development team is proud to present the first maintenance version 5.0.1 of its open source Personal Finance Manager. Although several members of the development team had been using the new version 5.0.0 in production for some time, a number of bugs and regressions slipped through testing, mainly in areas and features not used by them.
  • Qt Quick without a GPU: i.MX6 ULL
    With the introduction of the Qt Quick software renderer it became possible to use Qt Quick on devices without a GPU. We investigated how viable this option is on a lower end device, particularly the NXP i.MX6 ULL. It turns out that with some (partially not yet integrated) patches developed by KDAB and The Qt Company, the performance is very competitive. Even smooth video playback (with at least half-size VGA resolution) can be done by using the PXP engine on the i.MX6 ULL.