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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 21 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Best Calendar App for Linux srlinuxx 03/02/2012 - 9:07pm
Story Comment: Unity can't go it alone srlinuxx 03/02/2012 - 9:05pm
Story Google is killing Free Software srlinuxx 1 03/02/2012 - 11:49am
Story Anaconda to the Rescue srlinuxx 03/02/2012 - 4:23am
Story PCLinuxOS 2012.2 Released srlinuxx 03/02/2012 - 4:21am
Story Free Software Is Just Fine srlinuxx 03/02/2012 - 4:20am
Story Switching From Windows To Linux Easy With Zorin OS srlinuxx 03/02/2012 - 2:14am
Story GIMP 2.6.12 Released - The Final 2.6 srlinuxx 03/02/2012 - 2:12am
Story Spark answers srlinuxx 03/02/2012 - 2:10am
Story Precise Pangolin Alpha 2 Released srlinuxx 03/02/2012 - 2:09am

Reg readers take the Dell 'Open-source PC' challenge

Filed under
Hardware

In Redmond, Mikey Dell's plan didn't go over so well. Of all Microsoft's OEMs, Dell was the most favored - because it sold the most boxes. The word came down from the top. Dell would need to put on a tutu and twirl its way back to the all-Windows camp.

Firefox 1.5 Beta 2 Ready

Filed under
Software

Mozilla said the follow-up to September's Beta 1 includes improvements in the automatic update system, performance and site rendering enhancements, and fixes for several security problems.

Under /etc: A Simple Guide

Filed under
Linux

Newcomers to Linux, especially those coming from a Windows background, often find files in the /etc directory to be difficult to understand. In this article, I provide a brief explanation of some of these files and their uses.

SuSE Linux 10 Downloads Hard To Get

Filed under
SUSE

Users equipped with a BitTorrent client may have success downloading Linux 10. The openSuSE.org site warned that it may take several days for the downloading kinks to work out.

What I love about open source

Filed under
OSS

Let's be honest for a moment. How many of us were drawn to Linux because, in comparison with battleship grey Windows boringness and Chardonnay-sipping Mac pretension, Linux seemed... fun?

Microsoft chief dines in a Linux city

Filed under
Microsoft

Munich's move to Linux has been delayed and troubled, a situation that seems to vindicate views expressed by Ballmer about the drawbacks to open source software. But the city official implementing the Linux project disagreed strongly with much of what Ballmer said.

Symantec brings Microsoft complaint to EU

Filed under
Microsoft

Symantec has complained to European Commission antitrust regulators about Microsoft's entrance into the security business.

HACKING OPENSUSE

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

When you're done installing OpenSUSE 10.0, your desktop system is not complete. You still need support for Java programs, MP3 audio files, and browser plugins for Macromedia Flash, Adobe Acrobat, RealPlayer, and Windows Media Video. You may also want to add support for playing DVD videos on your computer. Here's how.

About SUSE Linux 10.0

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

The long awaited SUSE Linux 10.0 was finally released Thursday, October 6 as planned and listed in the roadmap. I don't know how many downloads they've clocked as of yet, but within minutes of the story breaking the OpenSUSE site and it's download mirrors had slowed to a crawl. There is a lot of interest in this release as evidenced by the large number of reads of my articles during the development cycle. The whole world was excited as I by Novell's decision to provide a free very close sibling to their enterprise product under the gpl and organizing a team to develop it. Up until that point SUSE interested me about as much as going to the dentist. They have my attention now!

Ark Linux Releases with KDE 3.5 Beta 1

Filed under
KDE

A release candidate of Ark Linux 2005.2 has been released, featuring KDE 3.5 Beta 1. The Ark Linux team are planning to release 2005.2 final at the same time as KDE 3.5 is released.

Inside the Novell Linux Migration

Filed under
SUSE

Details of Novell's migration have been sketchy, but in a public presentation to attendees of Ohio LinuxFest, company specialists gave a rare look inside the ongoing move to Linux and laid out one possible framework for other companies to follow in their own migration plans.

No more open-source Nessus

Filed under
OSS

The source code of the much popular security tool Nessus will no longer be available for the public. Starting from the next release, Nessus will be distributed freely, but not under GPL.

VectorLinux Standard Edition 5.1 Review

Filed under
Reviews

Vector Linux is a small distro based
on Slackware, it's goal is to be lightweight, quick and easy to use.
This is particularly true on older equipment.
I think it is fair to say that they have succeeded.

Linspire nears million-user mark

Filed under
Linux

The desktop Linux vendor claims to be gaining traction in the enterprise, including a pilot project at a company that has 'hundreds of thousands' of desktops.

October 2005 of TUX, Issue 07

Filed under
OSS

The October issue of TUX is now available for download. In this issue:

*Who Let the GNOME Dogs Out?
*Inkscape: the Elements of Design
*GnuCash
*Playing Windows Games on Linux with Cedega
*much more

Microsoft 'must support OpenDocument'

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft will be forced to adopt the open file format or risk 'sliding into irrelevance', according to industry observers.

Mandriva Linux 2006 has been released

Filed under
MDV

Right on the heels of the SuSE Linux 10.0 announcement comes Mandriva Linux 2006. Of course it's only available for club members at this time.

Linux pioneer wins lifetime achievement award

Filed under
Linux

Alan Cox's efforts maintaining the Linux kernel have been recognised at the LinuxWorld awards.

Making an OpenOffice.org 2.0 presentation

Filed under
HowTos

In this tip, follow OpenOffice.org instructor and author Solveig Haugland as she describes the step-by-step process for creating a presentation in the new 2.0 release of OpenOffice.

Check Point to Acquire Makers of Snort

Filed under
Software

Check Point Software Technologies Ltd. and Sourcefire, Inc., developers of Snort, today announced that they have signed an agreement for Check Point to acquire Sourcefire. What does this mean for Snort?

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.