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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 18 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Will New Android/Windows PCs Find Success? Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:05pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:03pm
Story Kali Linux 1.0.6 released. Cryptsetup has “nuclear option” integrated Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:00pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:00pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:55pm
Story Linux 3.14 May Bring Big VMware GPU Driver Update Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:52pm
Story Android 4.4 KitKat starts to hit Galaxy Note 3 Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:45pm
Story SteamOS updated with AMD support Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:42pm
Story Linux Drives Automotive Innovation into the New Year Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:37pm
Story Epic OpenShot 2.0 Update!(Part 2 of 3) Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:09am

Linux OS "just as bloated as Windows"

Filed under
Linux

A WEB SITE has launched into an attack on the 15 year old Linux in a tirade which puts the attack on James I in the shade.

Bringing a Linux box to Work - Part 2

Filed under
PCLOS

Part 2 in the series of articles that details my experiences in using a Linux box in a Microsoft enviroment. Day 1:

On Monday morning, I packed up my spare PC with a freshly installed copy of PCLinuxOS MiniMe 0.93, put it in the car, and took it to work with me.

Novell Renames Community Linux Distribution 'openSUSE'

Filed under
SUSE

Novell today announced simplified branding to make it even easier for customers to identify the right Linux* product for their needs. SUSE® Linux, Novell's award- winning community Linux distribution, will now be known as "openSUSE(TM)," echoing the name of the Novell-sponsored open source Linux project, openSUSE.org. Novell's enterprise Linux products will continue to be designated "SUSE Linux Enterprise."

Call for nominations for the 2006 FSF Award for the Advancement of Free Software

Filed under
OSS

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the GNU Project announce the request for nominations for the 2006 Award for the Advancement of Free Software. This annual award is presented to a person who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of software freedom (as defined in the Free Software Definition).

Book review: The Linux® Kernel Primer: A Top-Down Approach for x86 and PowerPC Architectures

Filed under
Reviews

The Linux Kernel Primer is a top down, C biased, project orientated story of how the Linux kernel works. With a little knowledge of C and a rough understanding of Linux basics, this book will lead you to a clear understanding of the kernel.

Open Source vs. Open Standards Telephony

Filed under
OSS

The focus of open source development at large is solving pragmatic problems. Many developers turn to open source because of frustrations they've experienced in working with proprietary technologies. Open source provides a level of flexibility that proprietary platforms cannot offer because they, like so many open standards platforms, require complicated implementations to achieve simple applications.

Intel 2006-08-09 Graphics Preview

Filed under
Reviews

Making news this afternoon is the release of Intel's next-generation graphics driver. This Linux display driver is open-source and supports all of the integrated graphics adapters from the i810 to the new i965 Express. As we were only alerted to these happening shortly in advance, we only have a few thoughts to share at this time.

Tip of the Trade: Knockd

Filed under
HowTos

Port-knocking has long been kicked around as a nearly fool-proof tactic for keeping intruders out of the network, while unfailingly allowing only legitimate connections. It works like this: The "secret knock" daemon listens on a network interface for a specific sequence of "knocks," or port hits. The client "knocks" by sending TCP or UDP packets to certain ports on the server. You don't need to leave any ports open for this work, because the daemon listens at the link-layer level. When the "secret knock" daemon detects the correct sequence of port hits, opens a port, and allows incoming traffic.

Managing users in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

As you notice from day to day use of Ubuntu, most tasks are easily accomplished. But what happens when you’re ready to expand your use of Ubuntu to include new applications, or connect to a home network and add new users?

Transgaming discusses problems (for Cedega) with ATI face to face

Filed under
Gaming

It seems as though Transgaming might have an ace up their sleeves to keep existing Transgamers and maybe even win back some. Quotes from the Transgaming Newsletter and development report:

Printing Avery labels with Linux

Filed under
HowTos

To aid users in the task of label printing, Avery Dennison offers a host of free (to download) software, including a program for the Mac released late last month. Linux still isn't supported, but that's no matter -- there's more than one open source application for Linux that lets you format text for printing on the whole universe of Avery labels, from DVD covers to business cards. Here's a look at them.

n/a

Intel aims for open-source graphics advantage

Filed under
OSS

Intel has released open-source software to give Linux full-fledged support for 3D graphics, a move that could give its graphics chips a leg up over rivals.

OSDL Signs Up Xandros To Accelerate Adoption Of Desktop Linux

Filed under
OSS

Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) and Xandros, provider of easy-to-use Linux alternatives to Windows desktop and server products, announced that Xandros is joining the Labs to help drive the adoption of desktop Linux.

Portable Linux Pact Quietly Fades Away, Leaving Questions

Filed under
Linux

More than two years after touting a deal to create a version of Linux for phones and other handheld gadgets, Wind River Systems and Red Hat are parting ways.

n/a

Giant Robots And Killer Licenses

Filed under
OSS

Maybe I should have titled this Why you should fear proprietary software. I generally leave pointing people to other stories to . . . er, um, well, other people. These stories, however, highlight so beautifully why open source software, open protocols, and open data formats are so important.

LinuxWorld Analysts Cite Hottest Open Source Trends

Filed under
Linux

What are some of the hottest trends in the Linux/open source market today? Avid activity among some resellers, abundant virtualization, and a growing tendency to mixed open source/proprietary deployments, according to a trio of top industry analysts, who helped to preview LinuxWorld San Francisco in an IDG-sponsored teleconference on Tuesday.

Also: Analysts: What to Look For at LinuxWorld

MythTV and AM2 on Linux war stories, a continuing saga

Filed under
Software

As you may recall from my last entry, I exchanged my cable box from a Scientific Atlanta 8000HD to a Scientific Atlanta 8300HD. The latter, new box continues to output a signal from the cable connection even if I have it in HDTV mode. It probably also continues to output AVI and S-Video. This finally opened up a way for me to use my cable box with a MythTV box.

The new platform maze

Filed under
Hardware

I own an old, quite customised Thinkpad a21m laptop, which I still use intensively when I’m out of town: with 256 Mb of RAM, a 750 MHz Pentium 3 chip and a 1024x768 screen running off an ATI chip, I can run pretty much all recent GNU/Linux distros around. I also have built a nice living-room warmer based off an Athlon64 X2 3800+ with a big, fat hard disk and more RAM than you can shake a stick at (well, almost). Is there a problem here?

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More in Tux Machines

Games: HITMAN and Atari VCS

More Android Leftovers

  • A Look at Google's Project Fi
    Project Fi is a play on the term "WiFi" and is pronounced "Project Fye", as opposed to "Project Fee", which is what I called it at first. Several features set Project Fi apart from other cell-phone plans. First, Project Fi uses towers from three carriers: T-Mobile, US Cellular and Sprint. When using supported hardware, Project Fi constantly monitors signal strength and seamlessly transitions between the various towers. Depending on where you live, this can mean constant access to the fastest network or a better chance of having any coverage at all. (I'm in the latter group, as I live in a rural area.)
  • OnePlus 5 and 5T's latest OxygenOS Open Beta bring Google Lens support
    While the last OxygenOS Open Beta update for the OnePlus 5 and OnePlus 5T was a significant upgrade bringing support for Project Treble, the latest versions for both devices offer smaller changes.
  • Google EU fine over Android likely this week
     

    The European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, normally makes such announcements on a Wednesday.

  • Moment of truth for Google as record EU antitrust fine looms
     

    It comes just over a year after the Commission slapped a landmark 2.4-billion-euro ($2.8 billion) penalty on Google, a unit of Alphabet Inc, for favoring its shopping service over those of competitors.  

    The EU penalty is likely to exceed the 2017 fine because of the broader scope of the Android case, sources familiar with the matter have told Reuters.  

OSS Leftovers

  • Medellín WordPress User Group Celebrates Open Source CMS Platform’s 15th Anniversary
    Medellín is well known for its innovative technology scene, with many active software and information technology user groups. One of those is the user group centered around open source content management software WordPress. A year ago the user group hosted Colombia’s first Wordcamp function, supported by the global WordPress community, and the user group recently gathered to celebrate the 15th anniversary of the first WordPress open source software release that took place May 27, 2003. WordPress is an free, open source software platform that allows amateur and professional users to create websites without writing programming code. Over the years it has grown into a powerful platform robust enough to run enterprise websites in many cases. For example, Finance Colombia runs on WordPress software.
  • Training: Embedded Linux and Security training day – Reading
    Providing detailed hands-on training, it is targeted at embedded engineers looking for an introduction to key embedded Linux and Security topics.
  • Amazing solar panel device that could change the world goes open source
    An innovative and simple solar panel efficiency device has just gone open source in order to get renewable energy to those who need it most. When you picture solar power, you might think of the enormous Ivanpah solar power plant in California (the largest in the world) or huge tracts of land in other sun-drenched parts of the globe. But not everyone has access to such enormous grids and particularly in remote villages in developing nations, there is only a need for a single or small group of solar panels that could maintain maximum efficiency to sustain a family or the village itself.
  • Meet the man in charge of Arduino

    I went to visit the Interaction Design Institute of Ivrea – a school that was started just six months before I went to visit them – and they asked me if I knew someone who could teach electronics to designers and to ask this question to my colleagues at the Politecnico.

    I went back and they said “No! Teaching electronics to designers? For us?” Those were guys working on highly sophisticated FGPAs, so they didn’t care about designers. I thought about Massimo – he had a real passion for electronics and he worked as a CTO for an internet provider at that point in time. I said, “Massimo, you could be the right person for this type of engagement – they’re designers, you love design, and you know electronics.” I introduced Massimo to the school and they hired him. That’s how the story started. When he was teaching at the Design Institute of Ivrea, they started the Arduino project as a way to standardise the electronics projects the students were doing. I introduced Massimo to the school and they invented Arduino, so I’m sort of the great-grandfather to some extent.

  • pinp 0.0.6: Two new options
    A small feature release of our pinp package for snazzier one or two column vignettes get onto CRAN a little earlier. It offers two new options. Saghir Bashir addressed a longer-standing help needed! issue and contributed code to select papersize options via the YAML header. And I added support for the collapse option of knitr, also via YAML header selection. A screenshot of the package vignette can be seen below. Additional screenshots of are at the pinp page.
  • OpenMP 5.0 Public Draft Released
    The public draft of the OpenMP 5.0 SMP programming standard is now available for review ahead of the specification's expected stable release before the end of 2018. OpenMP 5.0 is expected to succeed the OpenMP 4.5 parallel programming standard in Q4'2018, but for ironing out any last minute issues and allowing more compiler developers to begin implementing the standard, the public draft is now available.

FUD, EEE, and Openwashing