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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Microsoft deal is up, what now Victoria?

Filed under
OSS

When the Government of Australia's second largest state Victoria signed an $80 million, four-year contract with Microsoft in May 2002, advocates of open source software and other critics cried foul. Today that contract has just about expired, the Victorian Government has a new CIO, the NSW Government has opened its doors to Linux.

Also: Big Blue powers up Linux in NSW

Mandriva to Offer One Click Software Subscription Service

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva is introducing Mandriva One, a combined live and install CD based on Mandriva Linux 2006. In a few weeks, Mandriva will open the first version of Mandriva Kiosk, a one-click Web-based software installation service, to Club members.

No Way Has Innovation in Open Source Reached Its Limit

Filed under
OSS

"Linux is good at doing what other things already have done, but more cheaply - but can it do anything new?" That is the question asked by Steven Weber, a political scientist at the University of California at Berkeley, and author of "The Success of Open Source" (Harvard University Press, 2004), in a "Special Report" dated March 16 published in The Economist this week.

McNealy pumps open standards, open source

Filed under
Misc

Government agencies need to move towards open standards and managed services to cut IT costs and improve service to customers, Sun Microsystems chief executive Scott McNealy said during his keynote speech at the recent FOSE (Federal Office Systems Expo) conference in Washington DC.

Setting up a mail server using Postfix in 5 minutes

Filed under
HowTos

Continuing the (now lengthy) Server management series, this time we’ll learn how to set up a mail server, using the famous and very secure Postfix mail server package.

Newsmaker: Free software's white knight

Filed under
OSS

Eben Moglen, the longstanding legal counsel for the Free Software Foundation, became interested in computers at the age of 12. By 14, he was making money from writing computer programs.

Installation Of Computer Hardware In Georgian Schools To Be Finished By 2009

Filed under
Linux

The Ministry of Education of Georgia plans to introduce Linux OS within the frameworks of the Deer Lap, upon advice by the Estonian experts in 2005.

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Ultra-fierce DoS computer attacks on the rise

Filed under
Security

A shattering new form of the "denial-of-service" computer attack could be on the rise, according to a company that controls some of the internet's core infrastructure.

Virtualization vendors jostle for position in wake of Red Hat's virtual play

Filed under
Software

VMware Inc. reacted quickly to Red Hat's integrated virtualization roadmap this week, which uses open source Xen instead of VMware.

Researchers create world's first transparent integrated circuit

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Researchers at Oregon State University have created the world's first completely transparent integrated circuit from inorganic compounds, another major step forward for the rapidly evolving field of transparent electronics.

Newbie Debian Naming Hints

Filed under
Linux

The Debian release cycle is not only long, but has always three different branches: stable, testing (occasionally frozen) and stable.

But when a newbie goes there for download things, he will also notice symlinks to other names, currently sarge, etch and sid.

Taking MyahOS 2.0 for a little spin

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

I was recently informed of the new release of MyahOS 2.0. I began my download last night and tested the system today. I more or less quoted the developer, Jeremiah Cheatham, when I typed in our announcement. As was said, MyahOS 2.0 is a completely new system rebuilt from the ground up using Slackware Current packages. It features the 2.6.15.3 test kernel and has patched in squashfs, unionfs, and bootsplash. It also sports the latest KDE 3.5.1 with the latest qt and xorg 6.9.0.

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Kanotix Live-CD: Gentle Intro for Beginners

Filed under
Linux

Have you ever wondered what Linux is all about? Are you curious to see what everyone keeps referring to? Would you like a gentle and easy way to try out Linux without losing any of your Windows programs and files?

Live Patching on Linux

Filed under
Linux

To satisfy high-availability requirements, special-purpose operating systems, sometimes proprietary or self-developed operating system, were used. Live patching is one of the capabilities in version 3.1 of the CGL requirement definition document released in June 2005. This feature enables a process to modify its functions without restarting.

Get the Facts Yourself, Redmond

Filed under
OSS

After getting back to the home office, I found an anonymous note in the contrib queue of Linux Today (the page where I see all of the story recommendations sent in via the site). It was titled "Fake Microsoft Story?" and pointed to a URL on Microsoft Malaysia's Web site. I read it, and what was a good day became that much better.

Also: Amanda: Coverity Bugs Down to Zero

Preventing DDOS Attacks

Filed under
HowTos

DDOS happens due to lack of security awareness of the network/server owners. On a daily basis we hear that a particular machine is under DDOS attack or NOC has unplugged the machine due to DDOS attack. In this article I am trying to explain what DDOS is and how it can be prevented.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Equifax, Kodi, Infrared, and Windows XP in 2017

  • Safer but not immune: Cloud lessons from the Equifax breach
  • Warning: If you are using this Kodi repository, you could be in danger
    Kodi is quite possibly the best media center software of all time. If you are looking to watch videos or listen to music, the open source solution provides an excellent overall experience. Thanks to its support for "addons," it has the potential to become better all the time. You see, developers can easily add new functionality by writing an addon for the platform. And yes, some addons can be used for piracy, but not all of them are. These addons, such as Exodus and Covenant, are normally added using a repository, which hosts them. [...] We do not know 100 percent if the person that re-registered the metalkettle name on GitHub is planning anything evil, but it is better to be safe than sorry.
  • Infrared signals in surveillance cameras let malware jump network air gaps
    The malware prototype could be a crucial ingredient for attacks that target some of the world's most sensitive networks. Militaries, energy producers, and other critical infrastructure providers frequently disconnect such networks from the Internet as a precaution. In the event malware is installed, there is no way for it to make contact with attacker-controlled servers that receive stolen data or issue new commands. Such airgaps are one of the most basic measures for securing highly sensitive information and networks. The proof-of-concept malware uses connected surveillance cameras to bridge such airgaps. Instead of trying to use the Internet to reach attacker-controlled servers, the malware weaves passwords, cryptographic keys, and other types of data into infrared signals and uses a camera's built-in infrared lights to transmit them. A nearby attacker then records the signals with a video camera and later decodes embedded secrets. The same nearby attackers can embed data into infrared signals and beam them to an infected camera, where they're intercepted and decoded by the network malware. The covert channel works best when attackers have a direct line of sight to the video camera, but non-line-of-sight communication is also possible in some cases.
  • Manchester police still relies on Windows XP
    England's second biggest police force has revealed that more than one in five of its computers were still running Windows XP as of July. Greater Manchester Police told the BBC that 1,518 of its PCs ran the ageing operating system, representing 20.3% of all the office computers it used. Microsoft ended nearly all support for the operating system in 2014. Experts say its use could pose a hacking risk. The figure was disclosed as part of a wider Freedom of Information request. "Even if security vulnerabilities are identified in XP, Microsoft won't distribute patches in the same way it does for later releases of Windows," said Dr Steven Murdoch, a cyber-security expert at University College London.

Flock 2017, Fedora 27, and New Fedora 26 (F26) ISO

  • Flock 2017: How to make your application into a Flatpak?
  • Flock to Fedora 2017
  • Flock 2017 – A Marketing talk about a new era to come.
    I had two session at Flock this year, one done by me and another in support of Robert Mayr in the Mindshare one, if there were been any need for discussing. Here I’m talking about my session: Marketing – tasks and visions (I will push the report about the second one after Robert’s one, for completion). In order to fit the real target of a Flock conference (that is a contributor conference, not a show where people must demonstrate how much cool they are; we know it!) is to bring and show something new, whether ideas, software, changes and so on, and discuss with other contributors if they’re really innovative, useful and achievable.
  • F26-20170918 Updated Live isos released
  • GSoC2017 Final — Migrate Plinth to Fedora Server
  • Building Modules for Fedora 27
    Let me start with a wrong presumption that you have everything set up – you are a packager who knows what they want to achieve, you have a dist-git repository created, you have all the tooling installed. And of course, you know what Modularity is, and how and why do we use modulemd to define modular content. You know what Host, Platform, and Bootstrap modules are and how to use them.

Red Hat Financial Results Expectations High

Will Microsoft love Linux to death? Shuttleworth and Stallman on whether Windows 10 is free software's friend

Richard Stallman is a free-software activist and creator of the GNU OS that forms part of the basis of modern GNU/Linux distros. He believes that Microsoft's decision to build a Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) amounts to an attempt to extinguish software that users are free to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve. "It certainly looks that way. But it won't be so easy to extinguish us, because our reasons for using and advancing free software are not limited to practical convenience," he said. "We want freedom. As a way to use computers in freedom, Windows is a non-starter." Read more