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About Tux Machines

Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Unknown Horizons | Friday Game srlinuxx 10/08/2012 - 11:17pm
Story ZaReason UltraLap 430 is the first Linux Ultrabook srlinuxx 10/08/2012 - 10:56pm
Story Steam on Ubuntu could hurt gaming on Linux srlinuxx 10/08/2012 - 10:52pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 10/08/2012 - 8:34am
Story Raspberry Pi cases round-up srlinuxx 10/08/2012 - 8:27am
Story Fuduntu review srlinuxx 10/08/2012 - 3:53am
Story Scientific Linux 6.3 Review: Simply outstanding srlinuxx 10/08/2012 - 3:52am
Story ROSA Marathon 2012 GNOME preview srlinuxx 10/08/2012 - 3:47am
Story The Origin Of The Penguin Tux srlinuxx 10/08/2012 - 3:39am
Story The Naturalness In The Evolution Of Desktop Environments srlinuxx 10/08/2012 - 12:03am

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Google Earth on Linux

Filed under
Google
Software
-s

Here's a quick little tour from my 5 minutes of playing with Google Earth for Linux. It's kinda neato, but not as feature complete as the windows version I played with at the U.

Google Earth Linux Beta Available

Filed under
Google
Software

Want to know more about a specific location? Dive right in -- Google Earth combines satellite imagery, maps and the power of Google Search to put the world's geographic information at your fingertips. Linux version available.

Build a Mail Server with Commodity Hardware and FreeBSD

Filed under
HowTos

In this Recipe, I'll show you how to build a mail server for your SMB clients using simple, commodity PC hardware, the FreeBSD operating system, and several pieces of freely available open-source software. At first blush, this may appear to be a daunting task. But by following the steps in this Recipe, you'll find it's not difficult at all. In fact, you should be able to build the entire setup in just a couple of hours.

Ubuntu 6.06 Painless to Install, Full of Features

Filed under
Ubuntu

If you want to dual boot Ubuntu with Windows, you'll have to partition your hard drive. It's not as hard as it sounds, and the installation program guides you through it. Otherwise, if you're happy to only run Ubuntu -- and you really should be -- let it automatically take over the whole drive.

Still undecided? Then install Fedora Core 5!

Filed under
Linux

With the recent release of Ubuntu 6.06, the second quarter release season has now come to an end. Although all big distributions are already busy finalising the feature sets for their upcoming versions -- in fact, the first development releases of SUSE, Mandriva and Fedora are expected before the end of June. If you are still undecided about which distribution to try on your system, take a good look at Fedora Core 5.

Full Article.

Keep Tabs on Network Services with Nagios

Filed under
HowTos

Nagios provides an advanced server and device monitoring solution. It has become the de facto standard among other service monitoring applications, and is highly competitive with the non-free ones. This article will explain why Nagios is useful, and then cover some installation concepts to help get you started.

Creating virtual private networks with tsocks and VTun

Filed under
HowTos

Virtual private networks (VPN) let remote users connect back to corporate networks over encrypted links. Many VPNs are built with proprietary technology and can be tricky and expensive to set up. Let's look at two simple approaches that bring you transparency without the cost. All you need is Secure Shell (SSH) access to a server on the network you're trying to access.

Remastering Ubuntu Dapper Drake

Filed under
HowTos

How do you make a local version of Ubuntu? Get yourself a large amount of disk. Now you can start the real work.

The Omen (2006)

Filed under
Reviews

The new remake of The Omen that hit theaters last weekend was a great disappointment. It lacked the suspense and biting "horror" found in the original.

Dapper Drake verdict: It sucks

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The review we didn't want to write. It's buggy, it's unreliable, and it's definitely not polished. Dapper Drake doesn't deliver as promised. Now where did I put that copy of Suse 10.1?

Damn Small Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

It's been great fun exploring Linux distros with Parallels Workstation. Download an ISO, fire it up with Parallels and off we go. Damn Small Linux was the first distro to give me a hard time.

SUSE 10.1: Stumbling on Linux Happiness

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

SUSE 10.1 came out on May 11 and we've been putting through it's paces. Novell has released a solid update to their flagship operating system.

eBox Installation and Configuration

Filed under
Linux

eBox management tool will effectively and easily help you managing the advanced services for your corporate network. eBox is a framework for the development and deployment of network services in small and medium-sized networks, offering a simplified graphical interface to non expert users. It can be set up as a gateway, having some extra features over a usual router.

Read Full article here

CLI Magic: ext2hide veils sensitive files

Filed under
HowTos

ext2hide is a proof-of-concept program that seeks to magically hide confidential data and files where nobody will look for them. It accomplishes its magic by making use of otherwise abandoned space in the superblocks in ext2/ext3 filesystems.

Debian Install Guide

Filed under
HowTos

The Debian install process has come a long way, however it is still somewhat daunting to the unexperienced user. Installing Debian you are presented with more options than most other OS installers; this may seem more complicated but really it gives you much more control.

Any way the wind SCOs...

Filed under
OS

This week’s entry into their history of shame is a claim to own the standard Unix executable file format. What I took away from the whole circus, though, is that you’re playing with fire if you entrust your company or personal computing to proprietary software vendors.

Novell plugs Bandit for ID management

Filed under
SUSE

Novell on Monday plans to officially launch Bandit, an open-source identity management project that was quietly started earlier this year.

Use thttpd as your Web server when Apache is overkill

Filed under
HowTos

Apache, while being a fantastic Web server, is very hefty because of the many options and modules it comes with. If you're serving up static content or running a small Web site, Apache may be overkill. Fortunately, there is thttpd.

Counting on a Linux push

Filed under
Linux

Linux may be the catalyst that boosts sales of blade servers in India. As vendors such as IBM, Sun Microsystems, Hewlett-Packard and Dell grapple with new strategies to sell the sleek and expensive blade servers, the Linux operating system (OS) is the trump card they play to win over cost-conscious Indian IT buyers.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Why Linus is right (as usual)
    Last year, some security “hardening” code was added to the kernel to prevent a class of buffer-overflow/out-of-bounds issues. This code didn’t address any particular 0day vulnerability, but was designed to prevent a class of future potential exploits from being exploited. This is reasonable. This code had bugs, but that’s no sin. All code has bugs. The sin, from Linus’s point of view, is that when an overflow/out-of-bounds access was detected, the code would kill the user-mode process or kernel. Linus thinks it should have only generated warnings, and let the offending code continue to run.
  • Kube-Node: Let Your Kubernetes Cluster Auto-Manage Its Nodes
    As Michelle Noorali put it in her keynote address at KubeCon Europe in March of this year: the Kubernetes open source container orchestration engine is still hard for developers. In theory, developers are crazy about Kubernetes and container technologies, because they let them write their application once and then run it anywhere without having to worry about the underlying infrastructure. In reality, however, they still rely on operations in many aspects, which (understandably) dampens their enthusiasm about the disruptive potential of these technologies. One major downside for developers is that Kubernetes is not able to auto-manage and auto-scale its own machines. As a consequence, operations must get involved every time a worker node is deployed or deleted. Obviously, there are many node deployment solutions, including Terraform, Chef or Puppet, that make ops live much easier. However, all of them require domain-specific knowledge; a generic approach across various platforms that would not require ops intervention does not exist.
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Shares Bought by Aperio Group LLC
  • Cloudera, Inc. (CLDR) vs. Red Hat, Inc. (RHT): Breaking Down the Data

Software: VidCutter, Super Productivity, MKVToolNix

  • VidCutter 5.0 Released With Improved UI, Frame Accurate Cutting
    A new version of VidCutter, a free video trimmer app, is available for download. VidCutter 5.0 makes it easier to cut videos to specific frames, improves the export of video clips with audio and subtitle tracks, and refreshes the default application icon. Why Vidcutter? If you want split video, trim video, or join video clips into a single montage then Vidcutter is ideal. The app lets you perform these tasks, as well as many more, quickly and easily. VidCutter is a Qt5 application that uses the open-source FFMpeg media engine.
  • Linux Release Roundup: Fedora 27, Shotwell, Corebird + More
    It’s been another busy week in the world of Linux, but we’re here to bring you up to speed with a round-up of the most notable new releases. The past 7 days have given us a new version of free software’s most popular photo management app, a new release of a leading Linux distribution, and updated one of my favourite app finds of the year.
  • Super Productivity is a Super Useful To-Do App for Linux, Mac & Windows
    Super Productivity is an open-source to-do list and time tracking app for Windows, macOS and Linux. It’s built using Electron but doesn’t require an internet connection (which is pretty neat). And it has (optional) integration with Atlassian’s Jira software.
  • MKVToolNix 18.0.0 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Adds Performance Improvements
    A new stable release of the MKVToolNix open-source and cross-platform MKV (Matroska) manipulation software arrived this past weekend with various performance improvements and bug fixes. MKVToolNix 18.0.0 continues the monthly series of stability and reliability updates by adding performance improvements to both the AVC and HEVC ES parsers thanks to the implementation of support for copying much less memory, and enabling stack protection when building the program with Clang 3.5.0 or a new version.

OSS Leftovers

  • Reveal.js presentation hacks
    Ryan Jarvinen, a Red Hat open source advocate focusing on improving developer experience in the container community, has been using the Reveal.js presentation framework for more than five years. In his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, he shares what he's learned about Reveal.js and some ways to make better use of it. Reveal.js is an open source framework for creating presentations in HTML based on HTML5 and CSS. Ryan describes Gist-reveal.it, his project that makes it easier for users to create, fork, present, and share Reveal.js slides by using GitHub's Gist service as a datastore.
  • Font licensing and use: What you need to know
    Most of us have dozens of fonts installed on our computers, and countless others are available for download, but I suspect that most people, like me, use fonts unconsciously. I just open up LibreOffice or Scribus and use the defaults. Sometimes, however, we need a font for a specific purpose, and we need to decide which one is right for our project. Graphic designers are experts in choosing fonts, but in this article I'll explore typefaces for everyone who isn't a professional designer.
  • Broader role essential for OpenStack Foundation, says Mirantis’ Renski
  • URSA Announces Name Change to Open Source Integrators to Reflect Their Full Spectrum of Open ERP Expertise
  • 2018 is Year for Open Source Software for Pentagon
    The US Pentagon is set to make a major investment in open source software, if section 886 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 is passed. The section acknowledges the use of open source software, the release of source code into public repositories, and a competition to inspire work with open source that supports the mission of the Department of Defense.
  • How startups save buckets of money on early software development
     

    Moving along, we have to segue with a short modularity lesson. More specifically, how modularity applies to software.

    Essentially, all products and services become cheaper and more plentiful when all the processes involved in production become modularised.

today's howtos