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About Tux Machines

Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Novell defends SUSE Linux revenue performance

Filed under
SUSE

Novell Inc's president and COO Ron Hovsepian has defended the company's SUSE Linux business, maintaining that it is performing better than the company's revenue figures suggest.

What Thunderbird Lightning Users Want: Microsoft Outlook

Filed under
Moz/FF

The updated calendar extension for Thunderbird, Lightning 0.1, is on the streets. User reactions are upbeat, but they insist on more Outlook-like group scheduling and coordinating, as these users comments on the Lightning Suggestions wiki demonstrate:

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PostgreSQL Database Server Configuration

Filed under
Linux

PostgreSQL is a fully featured object-relational database management system. It supports a large part of the SQL standard and is designed to be extensible by users in many aspects. Some of the features are: ACID transactions, foreign keys, views, sequences, subqueries, triggers, user-defined types and functions, outer joins, multiversion concurrency control. Graphical user interfaces and bindings for many programming languages are available as well.

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Marcel's Linux App of the Month : kdissert

Filed under
Linux

Even after writing a half dozen books and several hundred articles, I still find it difficult to know where to start when I'm looking at a new project. Getting the germ of whatever ideas I might have down into something that starts to look and sound intelligent is anything but second nature. Somewhere in my head, there's a jumble of fleeting thoughts, ideas, and concepts, running every which way with no map for me to follow other than some casual mental digging here and there. If you find yourself in the same kind of cerebral jungle, what you and I really need is a mind map.

Tux goes retail: How open source is faring in big box retail stores

Filed under
Linux

Free open source software is making slow in-roads into the world of big box retail. This article is the first of a series which take a detailed look inside the world of retail as Tux is experiencing it.

Core Web Application Development with PHP and MySQL

Filed under
Interviews

Core Web Application Development with PHP and MySQL is a new addition to the Prentice Hall Core Series of books. It aims to present a complete approach to the development of web applications. In this article, we interview the author of the book, Marc Wandschneider, who has been programming in various professional and open source degrees for well over a decade now.

Book Review: A Beginner's Guide, Fourth Edition

Filed under
Reviews

One of the things I look for in a "beginner's guide" is a well rounded content selection. When I'm trying to learn how to administer Linux, nothing is more frustrating than to pick up a book that's advertised as "a complete guide", only to discover that either there are holes in the information base or that each subject is treated far too lightly to really learn anything.

Flock fellow flees: I'm flocking off

Filed under
Software

Flock's Chris Messina is leaving the company, five months after it unveiled its beta browser to the public. He served as "Director of Experience and Open Source Ambassador" for the startup.

A good day to be at a Linux show

Filed under
SUSE

I talked with several Novell executives by phone this week, and time and again they said that they were doing their darnest to make SLED (SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop) 10 not just the best Linux desktop, but the best business desktop, period. And, yes, they meant better than XP Pro and Vista.

New Web Service Looks To Push Office Off The Desktop

Filed under
Software

Entrepreneur Michael Robertson, a pioneer in online music, launched in beta on Thursday a Web service for creating documents and saving them on a computer's hard drive as a Microsoft Word file.

How to simulate a slow network

Filed under
HowTos

I think it is time to reveal a nifty little tool that I like to simulate a slow network connection, even without a network. It is called "tc" (think "traffic control") and is present on every modern Linux system. It is part of the "iproute" or "iproute2" package.

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Multiple live CDs in one DVD

Filed under
Linux

Live CDs do a great job of advertising Linux distributions. In addition to general-purpose live CD distributions, there are lots of task-oriented live CDs. Wouldn't it be great if you could carry multiple live CDs on one DVD disc? Nautopia.net has put up a script that you can use to make a custom DVD to boot multiple live CDs.

What's what in Linux 2.6.16

Filed under
Linux

If you wanted to sum up what's new in this latest release of Linux, you could say that it's a Linux for high-end enterprise users. However, this kernel is also the first one to support Toshiba, Sony, and IBM's CELL processor, which is best known as the chip that will power Sony's forthcoming PlayStation 3 game console.

Ballmer, Bemused

Filed under
Interviews

Fans of the popular Linux software program have long fretted that software giant Microsoft will attack Linux by claiming the free program violates Microsoft's patents. So far nothing has happened. But in an interview with Forbes.com, Microsoft Chief Executive Steve Ballmer wouldn't rule out such a showdown.

DSL Linux: Small distro that packs a big punch

Filed under
Linux

Need a teeny-tiny, business-card-sized, open source operating system that squeezes a lot of software into a little space? Take a look at DSL Linux®. This quick review shows you how to use the miniscule OS, highlights the on-board applications, details how to load and start it, and explains how to save between sessions when using a bootable CD.

KDE Afternoon at FISL to be Broadcast by InfomediaTV

Filed under
KDE

The International Free Software Forum will be held in Porto Alegre, Brazil from April 19 to 26. On the first day of the event KDE will be holding KDE Afternoon, a talk show hosted by developer Helio Castro and broadcast on Brazilian TV show InfomediaTV.

Four New RealPlayer Bugs Squashed

Filed under
Security

RealNetworks on Wednesday disclosed four critical bugs in a large number of its media products, then rolled out new, patched versions for Windows, Mac OS X, and Linux.

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More in Tux Machines

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%