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Tuesday, 14 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The Release of Linux 4.18

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.18

    One week late(r) and here we are - 4.18 is out there.

    It was a very calm week, and arguably I could just have released on
    schedule last week, but we did have some minor updates. Mostly
    networking, but some vfs race fixes (mentioned in the rc8 announment
    as "pending") and a couple of driver fixes (scsi, networking, i2c).
    Some other minor random things (arm crypto fix, parisc memory ordering
    fix). Shortlog appended for the (few) details.

    Some of these I was almost ready to just delay to until the next merge
    window, but they were marked for stable anyway, so it would just have
    caused more backporting. The vfs fixes are for old races that are
    really hard to hit (which is obviously why they are old and weren't
    noticed earlier). Some of them _have_ been seen in real life, some of
    them probably need explicit help to ever trigger (ie artificial delays
    just to show that "yes, this can actually happen in theory").

    Anyway, with this, the merge window for 4.19 is obviously open, and
    I'll start pulling tomorrow. I already have a couple of dozen pull
    requests pending due to the one-week delay of 4.18, but keep them
    coming.

    Linus

  • The 4.18 kernel is out

    Linus has released the 4.18 kernel. "It was a very calm week, and arguably I could just have released on schedule last week, but we did have some minor updates.

  • Linux 4.18 Kernel Officially Released

    Following the one week setback, the Linux 4.18 kernel is now officially available just a little more than two months since the cycle officially began.

    Linux 4.18 is now shipping and the latest kernel carrying the continued "Merciless Moray" codename.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Apps Are Now Available on More Chromebooks Powered by Intel Braswell CPUs

    It looks like Google is taking support for Linux apps very serious lately by recently enabling its integrated virtualization machine for running Linux apps on Chrome OS to support Chromebooks powered by Intel Braswell CPUs.

  • The Academy launches open-source foundation for media developers

    The idea is to enable them to share resources and collaborate on technologies for image creation, visual effects, animation and sound.

    “We are thrilled to partner with The Linux Foundation for this vital initiative that fosters more innovation, more collaboration, more creativity among artists and engineers in our community,” said Academy CEO Dawn Hudson. “The Academy Software Foundation is core to the mission of our Academy: promoting the arts and sciences of motion pictures.”

  • GSoC’18 Phase-3

    For this phase, I started with implementing Stamps feature in the Drawing activity. This feature allows users to use different stamps images in their beautiful arts. For now, I have added images from solar activity to use as stamps.

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 31

    This week we’re all at Akademy–KDE’s yearly gathering of developers, designers, system administrators, and users. I’m giving a presentation later today about how we can make KDE Software irresistible!

    As such, it as a bit of a lighter week for the Usability & Productivity initiative, what with all the preparation and conference-going, but we still managed to get quite a bit done. And all the in-person interactions are setting the stage for many more good things to come.

  • Something Happened to My OpenMandriva Lx OS

    Yesterday I booted my laptop with OpenMandriva Lx and went to look for a book. When I returned to the machine, a kernel panic was waiting for me on the screen.

    Apparently, something went very wrong with the updates that I performed last week, but I did not notice.

    This has happened before, though. As the laptop boots seven OSs (OpenMandriva, Mageia, PCLinuxOS, Pisi, Elive, Fedora, and PicarOS), when I install a system that changes the OMV-controlled GRUB2, OpenMandriva gets a panic.

    I do not have the expertise to rectify things other than by performing a re-install. So, I reinstalled OpenMandriva, updated it (the process did not last more than an hour or so) and, sure enough, the OS was bootable again.

    [...]

    Maybe it is time for me to start experimenting with BSD, Haiku, or something.

  • Google Pixel 3 XL Leak Reveals 6.7-inch Screen With Triple Camera Setup
  • Intel has no chance in servers and they know it

    Intel is flying press to an Analyst day to discuss their impending server meltdown. SemiAccurate has been detailing this impending catastrophe for over a year now, it is now time for the details.

  • Journeys

    This would be a long blog post as I would be sharing a lot of journeys, so have your favorite beverage in your hand and prepare for an evening of musing.

    Before starting the blog post, I have been surprised as the last week and the week before, lot of people have been liking my Debconf 2016 blog post on diaspora which is almost two years old. Almost all the names mean nothing to me but was left unsure as to reason of the spike. Were they debconf newcomers who saw my blog post and their experience was similar to mine or something, don’t know.

Source Analysis Research

Filed under
OSS
Security
  • Stylistic analysis can de-anonymize code, even compiled code

     

    A presentation today at Defcon from Drexel computer science prof Rachel Greenstadt and GWU computer sicence prof Aylin Caliskan builds on the pair's earlier work in identifying the authors of software and shows that they can, with a high degree of accuracy, identify the anonymous author of software, whether in source-code or binary form.  

  • Even Anonymous Coders Leave Fingerprints

     

    Rachel Greenstadt, an associate professor of computer science at Drexel University, and Aylin Caliskan, Greenstadt's former PhD student and now an assistant professor at George Washington University, have found that code, like other forms of stylistic expression, are not anonymous. At the DefCon hacking conference Friday, the pair will present a number of studies they've conducted using machine learning techniques to de-anonymize the authors of code samples. Their work could be useful in a plagiarism dispute, for instance, but it also has privacy implications, especially for the thousands of developers who contribute open source code to the world.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Tesla may Open Source Vehicle security Software to Other Car Manufacturers

    The best explanation to Tesla’s decision to give away its patents in good faith was written by  Bin Hu, Ming Hu, and Yi Yang on Informs.Org. They wrote, “We believe that Tesla opened up its patents to tip the scale between the two competing technologies in its favor. This is the logic: if Tesla’s patents are more likely to be adopted by other auto makers because they are free, the electric vehicle technology is more likely to become mainstream, and holding on to this belief, component suppliers (including energy companies by extension) are more likely to make investments into the electric vehicle technology rather than the competing hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle technology.”

  • Openbook is the latest dream of a digital life beyond Facebook

    As tech’s social giants wrestle with antisocial demons that appear to be both an emergent property of their platform power, and a consequence of specific leadership and values failures (evident as they publicly fail to enforce even the standards they claim to have), there are still people dreaming of a better way. Of social networking beyond outrage-fuelled adtech giants like Facebook and Twitter.

    There have been many such attempts to build a ‘better’ social network of course. Most have ended in the deadpool. A few are still around with varying degrees of success/usage (Snapchat, Ello and Mastodon are three that spring to mine). None has usurped Zuckerberg’s throne of course.

    [...]

    The team behind Openbook includes crypto(graphy) royalty, Phil Zimmermann — aka the father of PGP — who is on board as an advisor initially but billed as its “chief cryptographer”, as that’s what he’d be building for the platform if/when the time came. 

  • Classic Shell Rebrands Itself as Open Shell and Transitions into Open Source [Ed: If it only runs in Windows, then how "Open" can it really be? It's just a companion for spyware.]
  • Badgy is an open source E Ink badge

    Squaro Engineering has just developed their first e Ink product called Badgey. It features a 2.9 inch e-paper display with a resolution of 296×128 E and a five-way tactical switch for user input. The default firmware includes support for WiFiManager and OTA updates. This device retails for $29.99 and they offer volume pricing options, but it does not come with a battery, it has to be purchased separately.

  • Unifont 11.0.02 Released

    Unifont 11.0.02 is now available. This is an interim release, with another released planned in the autumn of 2018. The main addition in this release is David Corbett's contribution of the over 600 glyphs in the Sutton SignWriting Unicode block.

BSD: OpenSSH 7.8, mandoc, nbdkit

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BSD

Ubuntu 18.04 Vs. Fedora 28

Filed under
Linux

Hello folks. Today I'll highlight some of the features and differences between the two popular Linux distros; Ubuntu 18.04 and Fedora 28. Each has their own package management; Ubuntu uses DEB while Fedora uses RPM, but both of them features the same Desktop Environment (GNOME) and aims to provide quality desktop experience for the Linux users.

Read<br />
more

Brasero – Disk Burning App for Ubuntu, Linux Mint

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Ubuntu

Brasero is a very simple disk burning GNOME app available for all Linux distributions. However, for sometime it has been removed from the standard Ubuntu OS images. The main reason behind is the low usage of DVD, CD storage mediums in recent times. However, if you still wants to burn some disks, erase or re-write some disks, you can still install Brasero in Ubuntu and other Linux distributions.

Read more

Kernel: Linux 4.18, Linux 4.19, Linux Plumbers Conference and Mesa 18.1.6 Release Notice

Filed under
Linux
  • Patches Revised For AMD Zen Based Hygon Dhyana Server CPUs

    Patches have been revised for the Linux kernel to support the initial Hygon Dhyana server CPUs that are the licensed AMD Family 17h "Zen" technology, basically the EPYC server CPUs for the Chinese market.

    Back in June the initial Hygon Dhyana Linux patches were posted and today they were revised for the third time. V3 of the Hygon Dhyana patches are re-based against the latest Linux 4.18 development code and rework some of the vendor checking codes for improved consistency.

  • Qualcomm Adreno 600 Series Support Proposed For Linux 4.19 Kernel

    While a bit late, Freedreno lead developer Rob Clark is hoping to see the Qualcomm Adreno 600 series bring-up happen for the Linux 4.19 kernel cycle.

    The MSM Direct Rendering Manager has long been prepping for Adreno 600 series support as the latest-generation Qualcomm graphics found on their Snapdragon SoCs. The initial code for A6xx was posted earlier this year including work by Qualcomm / Code Aurora on that hardware bring-up. With Linux 4.19 queued in DRM-Next is already the "DPU1" display code needed for newer SoCs and Rob Clark is hoping to get the working A6xx support in place for this cycle.

  • Linux Plumbers Conference: Early Registration Ending Soon!

    The early registration deadline is August 18, 2018, after which the regular-registration period will begin. So to save $150, register for the Linux Plumbers Conference before August 18th!

  • Mesa 18.1.6 Release Notice

    Due to a busy week and a slip of my mind I didn't get out the announcement for 18.1.6 on Wednesday. Therefore, I'm planning to make the release Monday August 13th, at or around 10AM PDT.

  • Mesa 18.1.6 On The Way With Over Three Dozen Fixes

    While Mesa 18.2 is baking for release later this month, Mesa 18.1 remains the currently supported stable series. Final release preparations are underway for Mesa 18.1.6 as the latest bi-weekly point release.

    Mesa 18.1.6 is expected to be released this coming Monday, 13 August, and so far has staged more than three dozen fixes as confirmed via Friday's release notice.

Programming/Development: Git-cinnabar Release and Programming Language Rankings

Filed under
Development
  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.5.0

    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.

  • The RedMonk Programming Language Rankings: June 2018

    They’re a month overdue, and from the volume of inbound questions about when the language rankings would drop, it’s been noticed. As always, these are a continuation of the work originally performed by Drew Conway and John Myles White late in 2010. While the means of collection has changed, the basic process remains the same: we extract language rankings from GitHub and Stack Overflow, and combine them for a ranking that attempts to reflect both code (GitHub) and discussion (Stack Overflow) traction. The idea is not to offer a statistically valid representation of current usage, but rather to correlate language discussion and usage in an effort to extract insights into potential future adoption trends.

Graphics/Ubuntu: Wayland 1.16 and Weston 5.0 Release Candidates, XDG Shell Stable Supported by Mir

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu
  • [ANNOUNCE] wayland-1.15.93

    The RC1 release candidate for wayland 1.16 is now available.

  • Wayland 1.16 & Weston 5.0 Release Candidates For Testing

    Derek Foreman of Samsung's Open-Source Group put out the release candidates on Friday for the upcoming Wayland 1.16 release as well as the Weston 5.0 reference compositor.

    The Wayland 1.16 release candidate hasn't seen any changes over the earlier development release besides updating the contributor documentation to reflect that Gitlab is now used for handling merge requests. The Wayland 1.16 cycle overall was quite light but earlier in the cycle it did see build system updates, dropping of the wl_buffer definition, and the protocol now allows a zero physical size output.

  • XDG Shell Stable Supported by Mir

    Support for the stable XDG Shell protocol has just landed in Mir, and it will ship with the next release. It will eventually replace XDG Shell unstable v6 as the primary way in which Wayland applications create traditional style windows. You can get it now in our development PPA: ppa:mir-team/dev.

  • Mir Now Supports XDG Shell Stable

    Canonical developers continue working on advancing the Mir display server's support for Wayland.

    The latest Wayland enhancement to Mir is on supporting the stable version of the XDG Shell protocol. XDG-Shell is the protocol for improved management of Wayland surfaces including for minimization of windows, dragging, resizing, and other desktop-aligned tasks. XDG Shell also defines protocol around transient windows like pop-up menus.

Red Hat Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Games: SteamOS, GOG, 'Gibbous - A Cthulhu Adventure', Kingdom Rush Origins

Filed under
Gaming

Proprietary Software on GNU/Linux: Dropbox and VMware Player 14

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
  • Dropbox makes the cloud rain poop on Linux users

    Cloud storage rules -- especially when coupled with a local backup plan. Quite frankly, it is one of the best computing innovations of all time. How cool is it that you can easily backup important files to an offsite location? Let's be honest -- before the cloud, many computer and smartphone users didn't bother backing up at all. While many still do not, the cloud has definitely improved the situation through convenience and affordability.

  • VMware Player 14 review - Alternate reality

    VMware Workstation Player is a very decent program, especially for new users. It comes with a reasonable set of options, it tries to guess what you're doing and help, and for lightweight use, it makes perfect sense. But if you are an advanced user, you will definitely need and want more, and this is where the full pro version comes into play. Or alternatively, go for other options. Overall, it remains similar to version 4, which I tested several years ago.

    My biggest gripe is not having hardware acceleration, which significantly improves the performance of virtual machines. The network and storage side of things are less critical for everyday use. Multi-VM is also important if you need to create more complicated setups or labs. That said, the program is simple and easy, and has a very gentle curve for people just freshly starting in the virtualization world. Worth testing, but always remember, 'tis but a teaser for the heavyweight just hiding behind the corner. Indeed, for me, the big take from this endeavor is that I need to test the Workstation as well. We shall see.

Source Code From Tesla

Filed under
OSS

GSoC: KDE and GNOME Final Reports

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • GSoC 2018: Final week

    Coming to the last week, the activity Note_names is finally developed and being tested on different platforms.

    Principle: This activity aims to teach sight reading the musical notes and their position on the staff by presenting several notes one-by-one with animation from the right of the staff sliding to the right of the clef image. The user will get the combination of all the notes he has learned previously and the current targetted notes from the dataset. Only the reference notes are colored as red and the user is made to learn the notes around it using it as a leverage. One has to correct enough notes to get a 100% and advance to next stage.

  • Five-or-More Modernisation: It's a Wrap

    As probably most of you already know, or recently found out, at the beginning of this week the GSoC coding period officially ended, and it is time for us, GSoC students, to submit our final evaluations and the results we achieved thus far. This blog post, as you can probably tell from the title, will be a summary of all of the work I put into modernising Five or More throughout the summer months.

    My main task was rewriting Five or More in Vala since this simple and fun game did not find its way to the list of those included in the Games Modernisation Initiative. This fun, strategy game consists of aligning, as often as possible, five or more objects of the same shape and color, to make them disappear and score points.

  • The end of GSoC

    After three months of hard work and a lot of coding the Google Summer of Code is over. I learned a lot and had a lot fun. GSoC was an amazing experience and I encourage everybody to participate in future editions. At this point I’ve been a contributor to GNOME for nearly a year, and I plan on sticking around for a long time. I really hope that other GSoC students also found it so enjoyable, and keep contributing to GNOME or other Free Software Projects.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
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More in Tux Machines

5 of the Best Linux Educational Software and Games for Kids

Linux is a very powerful operating system, and that explains why it powers most of the servers on the Internet. Though it may not be the best OS in terms of user friendliness, its diversity is commendable. Everyone has their own need for Linux. Be it for coding, educational purposes or the internet of things (IoT), you’ll always find a suitable Linux distro for every use. To that end, many have dubbed Linux as the OS for future computing. Because the future belongs to the kids of today, introducing them to Linux is the best way to prepare them for what the future holds. This OS may not have a reputation for popular games such as FIFA or PES; however, it offers the best educational software and games for kids. These are five of the best Linux educational software to keep your kids ahead of the game. Read more

Kernel: NSA Code/Algorithm in Linux, Performance Superiority Over Windows, and Linux Foundation News

  • Linux 4.18 brings support for Vega M, Volta GV100 and, er, SPECK
    AFTER A WEEK'S DELAY, Linux kernel 4.18 stable has arrived. Announcing the release on Sunday, head of Linuxing Linus Torvalds said: "One week late(r) and here we are - 4.18 is out there. It was a very calm week, and arguably I could just have released on schedule last week, but we did have some minor updates." One notable change is that there's been a lot of code ditched - around 100,000 lines of obsolete code has been slashed.
  • The AMD Threadripper 2990WX shows even higher numbers when benchmarked on Linux
    Phoronix has done a performance comparison of the AMD Threadripper 2990WX in Windows 10 Pro and Linux and the results show Threadripper numbers significantly lower under Windows 10 Pro than in Linux. In some tests such as 7-Zip Compression, the Threadripper 2990WX posted almost 58% higher scores in Linux compared to Windows 10 Pro implying that Linux is a better OS of choice when testing high core count CPUs.
  • Diversity Empowerment Summit Highlights Importance of Allies
    Diversity and inclusion are hot topics as projects compete to attract more talent to power development efforts now as well as build their ranks to carry the projects into the future. The Diversity Empowerment Summit co-located with Open Source Summit coming up in Vancouver August 29-31, will offer key insights to help your project succeed in these endeavors. Although adoption of diversity and inclusion policies is generally seen as simply the right thing to do, finding good paths to building and implementing such policies within existing community cultures continues to be challenging. The Diversity Empowerment Summit, however, provides hard insights, new ideas, and proven examples to help open source professionals navigate this journey.
  • Hollywood rolls out red carpet for open source developers
    The launch of the ASWF is almost like creating a GitHub for the developers behind motion pictures, but open source is nothing new to the film industry. It dates back about 20 years, Andy Maltz, managing director of the Science and Technology Council at the Academy, told CIO Dive. Film "is the only art form that has a fundamental reliance on technology," he said. The film industry's use of tech dates back to photochemical technologies and proceeds to today's digital image capture.

Microsoft Openwashing and Infiltration Tactics

Debian GNU/Linux project to mark 25th birthday on Thursday

The Debian GNU/Linux project will turn 25 on Thursday, with the Linux distribution having made its debut on 16 August in 1993 under the leadership of the late Ian Murdock. In its original manifesto, Murdock stated: "Many distributions have started out as fairly good systems, but as time passes attention to maintaining the distribution becomes a secondary concern." Maintaining a Debian system was made simple after some developers created a package management system known as apt. Apt — and its derivatives like aptitude and synaptic — have served to make the task of updating a Debian system simple. With apt, the secondary concern that Murdock referred to was effectively taken care of. Incidentally, there are now about 29,000 packages available in Debian. Read more Also new (Debian-related news):

  • DebConf 18
  • Google Summer of Code 2018- Final Report
    This project aims at developing tools and packages which would simplify the process for new applicants in the open source community to get the required setup. It would consist of a GUI/Wizard with integrated scripts to setup various communication and development tools like PGP and SSH key, DNS, IRC, XMPP, mail filters along with Jekyll blog creation, mailing lists subscription, project planner, searching for developer meet-ups, source code scanner and much more! The project would be free and open source hosted on Salsa (Debian based Gitlab) I created various scripts and packages for automating tasks and helping a user get started by managing contacts, emails, subscribe to developer’s lists, getting started with Github, IRC and more.